OH the key to helping employers understand, and support, less well-known conditions

first_imgOH the key to helping employers understand, and support, less well-known conditionsBy Christine Husbands on 9 Apr 2021 in Musculoskeletal disorders, Health surveillance, OH service delivery, Return to work and rehabilitation, Sickness absence management, Occupational Health, Personnel Today MS is one of a number of less well-understood conditions that can go under the workplace health radar. Image: Shutterstock Less common, or less well-known or understood, health conditions such as auto-immune diseases, ME, epilepsy and MS can often go under the radar from a workplace health support perspective. But they are still important for employers and, especially with the NHS under such pressure from Covid-19, something occupational health should be addressing, argues Christine Husbands.When we think about long-term health conditions, illnesses such as cancer, cardiac and stroke may spring to mind. While it is true these conditions do make up a large proportion of the chronic conditions affecting employees, there is also a vast range of other chronic conditions with significant long-term effects that often go unrecognised by employers.Yet these other, less well-known conditions, when added together, affect a significant number of working-age people.About the authorChristine Husbands is managing director of RedArc NursesFor example: auto-immune diseases collectively affect around four million people living in the UK. Some 400,000 people live with rheumatoid arthritis, a similar number with type 1 diabetes, 100,000 with multiple sclerosis, two million with hypothyroidism, and so on.Lack of publicity can mean a lack of supportThese conditions are what we might term “the poor relation” when it comes to publicity and hence they are less well known than the headline-hitting diseases that often have more resources, such as large national charities providing research and support, national screening programmes and the lion’s share of NHS resources.Employer awareness of the existence, let alone the implications and side-effects, of these conditions, is therefore generally much lower and hence they often go unrecognised and unsupported.As well as diseases, acute or chronic illness can be difficult to live with, such as sleep apnoea, hearing or vision loss, menopause, autism, and many more.The NHS, of course, is the first port of call for any medical conditions, but chronic conditions can be time-consuming to diagnose or even end up being misdiagnosed. Moreover, even after a formal diagnosis, the pressures the NHS is under, especially now because of Covid-19, can mean services are difficult to access on a regular and reliable basis. Some examples of the common less well-known condition and their implications from a workplace health perspective are:1) Epilepsy. According to the Epilepsy Society, around 87 people are diagnosed every day and over 500,000 people are living with epilepsy in the UK. Epilepsy is a neurological condition which can cause up to 40 different types of seizures of varying severity.Everyday life can be significantly impacted depending on how well seizures are controlled. Some common implications of epilepsy are:Inability to drive or operate machinery.Inability to carry out a normal job.Medication can cause tiredness, make it difficult to concentrate which may affect performance at work and social interaction with others.2) Myalgic Encephalopathy (ME), also known as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS). The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) estimates that the prevalence for ME/CFS in the UK is between 0.2% and 0.4%.Sufferers experience extreme tiredness and other physical symptoms that make it very difficult to carry out everyday activities, people often have to make some major lifestyle changes. Particular implications can include:As there is no specific diagnosis, a diagnosis is based on ruling other things out. Patients can go through many years of self-doubt before a formal diagnosis is arrived at and this can take up to 5 years, many people give up.It is generally misunderstood or not recognised by family, friends and employers which adds to the self-doubt of the individual.This condition is also often not understood within the health care profession.Access to therapies and services are often not available within the NHS until there is a formally diagnosed condition.The impact on physical health and emotional wellbeing can be devastating especially when there is no formal diagnosis.Work can be significantly affected, with most people needing to have flexibility or reduced hours and some people needing to give up altogether, adding financial worries to the mix.3) Multiple Sclerosis (MS). The MS Society estimates that there are approximately 130,000 people in the UK with MS with 7,000 newly diagnosed every year. MS is a condition that affects the brain and spinal cord, the coating that protects the nerves is damaged and causes a range of symptoms such as blurred vision and problems with mobility and emotions.The symptoms of MS can vary from person to person and can affect people in very different ways. Sometimes the symptoms can be managed well and in others it can significantly impact their quality of life.Depending on the type of MS, symptoms may come and go or get steadily worse.As symptoms can vary and others may be hidden – such as fatigue – this can cause issues such as not being believed or understood. This can be problematic in the workplace with colleagues and employers alike and there have been examples of hurtful comments whilst parking in disabled bays.Holistic support needsHow, therefore, can employers help? When employees have such conditions, there are many practical areas where employers can support employees directly, with arrangements such as flexible working or specialist workplace adjustments.In addition, externally provided practical support such as arranging a second medical opinion (particularly valuable when a diagnosis is doubted), private consultations and diagnostics as well as private treatment, complementary therapies and much more. Expert guidance is vital to ensure that appropriate services are provided.Whilst treatment may be available on the NHS, doctors and nurses may rarely have the time to offer complementary support, such as support for patients’ emotional needs.The importance of good emotional wellbeing is fundamental to successful management of many chronic conditions, so a lack of emotional support can be very detrimental to the physical symptoms and ability to carry out everyday tasks.Holistic support, addressing both physical and emotional aspects together, is most effective for the management of long-term chronic conditions, enabling the employee to carry out their role most effectively and live as normal a life as possible.Availability of supportEmployee benefits often include a range of health services such as support for mental health via an employee assistance programme (EAP), and other needs are catered for in the form of access to private GPs and private medical insurance.Group insurance products such as critical illness, income protection and life insurance often include support services, some of which cater for any health condition.Therefore, it is important that employers ensure support services cater for a wide range of health conditions not just the most common ones, otherwise a large proportion of employees will remain unsupported.References“Research first could help four million with autoimmune conditions in the UK”, October 2018, JDRF, https://jdrf.org.uk/news/research-first-could-help-four-million-with-autoimmune-conditions-in-the-uk/#:~:text=The%20group%20estimates%20four%20million,over%20400%2C000%20with%20rheumatoid%20arthritisEpilepsy facts and terminology, Epilepsy UK, https://www.epilepsy.org.uk/press/facts#:~:text=Every%20day%2C%2087%20people%20are,have%20a%20diagnosis%20of%20epilepsyNational Institute for Health and Care Excellence, Clinical Guideline CG53, Chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (or encephalopathy): diagnosis and managementAugust 2007, https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/cg53/chapter/IntroductionMS in the UK, MS Society, https://www.mssociety.org.uk/what-we-do/our-work/our-evidence/ms-in-the-uk Previous Article Next Article Governments told to prioritise tackling rheumatic and musculoskeletal conditionsGovernments across Europe are being urged to create a comprehensive strategy to tackle rheumatic and musculoskeletal conditions, which currently affect… No comments yet. Leave a Reply Click here to cancel reply.Comment Name (required) Email (will not be published) (required) Websitecenter_img Musculoskeletal care and occupational health: only for more ‘enlightened’ employers?The good news is musculoskeletal care for working-age people is widely considered a priority area by clinical commissioning groups, a… NHS pledges ‘long Covid’ sufferers access to specialist support and rehabilitationPeople suffering so-called ‘long Covid’ symptoms months after contracting the virus are to be offered specialist help at NHS clinics… Related posts:last_img read more

Read more

US is not our competitor in shale market, says UAE energy minister Suhail Al Mazroui

first_img The UAE minister for energy Suhail Al Mazroui says US shale production has helped drive the global oil and gas industry to new heights The US and its well-documented shale boom has been a positive influence on the global energy market rather than one to be competed with, according to UAE minister for energy Suhail Al Mazroui.Through a combination of advanced drilling technology and prolific capital expenditure, America has become one of the top oil and gas producers anywhere in the world over the course of the past few decades – a process some have termed the “shale revolution”.With capacity and export levels reaching new heights every quarter, the country has built a platform on which it can go toe-to-toe with the more established suppliers from the Middle East.When a nation with such sway over the global economy opens up an entirely new industry and swiftly marches to its peak, repercussions are felt in all corners of the world as market dynamics jostle and shift.Speaking at the 24th World Energy Congress in Abu Dhabi, Mazroui said: “At the beginning, there were some worries about this newcomer and how big it was going to be.“But for an economy like the US, it was needed and that evolution became a revolution in that it brought the cost of finding other carbon much lower than it was before.“This used to be one of the most challenging resources, the US has excelled in the development of shale oil and I think we helped in the deal that we have done with OPEC.“But if you think of the world without it today, I think it would be suffering, the economy would suffer, it’s a complimenting factor rather than a competitive one.“Shale production has reached historical levels and if the US was not part of the global market, I cannot think of where you would find enough barrels to replace what the country has provided – it has created lots of opportunities for other countries to deepen their resources.” Entire countries have become highly dependent on oil and gas imports from the US as a result of its rapid shale expansion US shale boom’s effect on global energy marketAmerica’s growing shale market has created dependencies from countries in all corners of the world.In Mexico, for example, natural gas production has waned over the past decade but its imports from the US have risen at a commensurate rate – despite its recently-elected president’s efforts to reverse the dynamic.In July 2017, extraction dropped below five million cubic feet per day, a 40% decrease since 2012, before reliance on natural gas from the US reached a new record-high in August last year with almost 6 bcfd delivered over the border in that month alone.US deputy energy secretary Dan Brouillette said: “I think the impact of the US’ shale revolution has been fairly dramatic.“We began some years ago somewhat dependant on foreign sources of oil and our economy is largely driven by oil prices and its availability.“Subject to some events and poor regulation, we had periods in which there were severe shortfalls but now we’ve had tremendous turn around.“That turnaround is due to innovation, and that alone has been transformative to the US economy and the global economy as a result.”last_img read more

Read more

Germany not stopping patrol boat export to Saudi Arabia

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today Germany not stopping patrol boat export to Saudi Arabia January 27, 2016 View post tag: Patrol Boat German naval shipyard Lürssen has started construction of the 15 patrol vessels for Saudi Arabia under the €1.5 billion (approx $1.63b) contract despite of talks about cancelling the deal amidst the Middle Eastern country’s public executions early January 2016.German news-site Ostsee-Zeitung reported that the German Federal Ministry of Economics confirmed that the production phase of the probably biggest weapon-export contract in Germany had started.Spiegel online said that the German Minister for Economic Affairs should have been more consistent in his actions as he was among the first to call for a cancellation of the contract. It further said that the vessel contract was perfect for sharper restrictions as the patrol vessels represented defensive weapon systems.German politicians criticized the executions in Saudi Arabia sharply and proposed a ban on military exports to the country. A representative of Wolgast, the city in which the shipyard is located, argued in the German Council that the patrol vessel was essentially “not war technology in a traditional sense” but more of a policing instrument used to protect the state’s coastal region.The Lürssen shipyard received the 15 vessel contract in the Summer of 2015 under which it is to deliver its TNC 35 and FPB 38 patrol boats. According to Lürssen, the 35 meter TNC 35 vessel is equipped with two diesel engines with a combined output of 7.800 kW and can reach a speed of 40 knots. The longer FPB 38 is, as its name suggests, 38 meters long and at a maximum speed of 31 knots a bit slower than the TNC 35. Authorities Share this article View post tag: Germany Germany not stopping patrol boat export to Saudi Arabia View post tag: Saudi Arabian Navylast_img read more

Read more

‘In theory, it won’t turn over’

first_imgOxforddaredevil David Kirke is planning to fly a giant inflat­able winged horse fromthe base of Mount Olympus in Greece,across the Mediterranean, to Tripoli,Libya.Thefifty-nine year old hopes to recreate the mythical flight of Pegasus on a fortyfoot high white stallion, with a wingspan of 80ft, following his successfulattempt in 1986 to ‘hop’ across the English Channel in the pouch of an inflat­ablekangaroo.Kirkefounded the Oxford University Dangerous Sports Club in the late seventies,along with Chris Baker and Ed Hulton. The Club first came to public attentionwhen Kirke became the first person in the world to do a bungee jump, on 1 April1979, from the Clifton Suspension Bridge in Bristol. His maiden jump earned him arrestfor ‘disturbing the peace’ and a £100 fine.Kirkedescribed his latest endeav­our as an “engineering nightmare”. Asked whether hehad an ETA or a rough idea of when Pegasus would be ready, he laughed andreplied, “No ETA. ETAs are a luxury.” He explained that “even a simple thinglike bungee jumping took a great deal of Maths beforehand.”“Itwill be a real engineering challenge to build, but no one has ever done itthroughout history. There are hundreds of thousands of images of Pegasus, butno one has actually seen one fly through the air. In theory it should not turnover because the wind should hit all the surfaces at the same time. That’s thetheory.”Whencompleted, Pegasus will be entirely inflatable, made of a specially-designedfabric, combin­ing strength and lightness. Helium gas will be used forinflation, rather than hydrogen burners, and the horse will gain height byoffloading ballast and descend by releasing helium. Kirke plans to pilot hisequine companion from a position somewhere near its head, but he will be verymuch dependent on the trade winds blowing down through Africafor direction.Theveteran daredevil and pioneer of ‘extreme sports’ said, “There will be plentyof nights leading up to it sipping horlicks and biting finger­nails but worriesare just something you have to sort out before you go because otherwise itspoils the fun when you do.”Theattempt could cost up to £100,000. However, Kirke is encouraged by the factthat a large number of companies around the world use the Pegasus name andimage, and he believes that this will increase the likelihood of secur­ingsufficient sponsorship for the projectARCHIVE: 6th week MT 2005last_img read more

Read more

Pret adds green aspect for customers

first_imgPret A Manger is launching recycling facilities for customers at its branches this July.The ’co-mingled’ recycling will mean that all of the company’s product packaging can be placed in a single bin, ready for sorting later at the recycling plant.In a statement, Pret said: “This keeps it simple and ensures that we can recycle as much as possible.”When the scheme gets up and running, we will publish regular updates on the volumes recycled. We will do the same for all of our kitchen packa- ging too.”Eighty per cent of customers take the packaging out of the shop, according to Pret, which says it would like to see more office-based recycling put into place.last_img

Read more

Scottish bakery invests £100k for growth

first_imgScottish business Johnstone’s Bakers has invested £100,000 in product development and expansion.The funding from UK Steel Enterprise (UKSE) has allowed the bakery to purchase additional equipment, create 20 new jobs, and support the development of a new range of Johnstone’s own name branded products.UKSE’s investment is anticipated to help the East Kilbride-based company to double the factory’s oven capacity to facilitate increasing orders.Kevin Moore, managing director at Johnstone’s Bakers, said: “UKSE’s confidence in us has given our whole team a huge boost and their service could only be described as excellent. The investment has been fundamental to our expansion drive and we are now able to take our company to the next level with the development of many new products in the pipeline for the current year.”Scott Webb, regional executive at UKSE, added: “Kevin has taken Johnstone’s Bakers to new heights and UK Steel Enterprise saw this as an exciting investment opportunity. We can see the huge potential in this company and with such a strong presence in the retail sector already, we cannot wait to see where their range of Johnstone’s branded products takes them.”Moore bought Johnstone’s in 2006, and has since grown the company’s sales turnover by 400% after relocating to larger premises and devising a new business strategy.Johnstone’s currently exports cake goods to Australia and Germany, with plans to expand this financial year.UKSE is a subsidiary of Tata Steel Group, set up to help growing companies operating in former steel-producing areas realise their full potential, boost the local economy and create jobs.The funding package is UKSE’s third business investment in Scotland within the past two months.last_img read more

Read more

Follow Truck practice live from Eldora

first_imgREAD: First-half season awards READ: Complete coverage from Chicagoland READ: Memorable moments of the first half Follow Truck practice live form Eldora, 4:30 p.m. ET, Tuesday, July 23center_img READ MORE: READ: Eldora qualifying procedures explainedlast_img

Read more

Moog Speaks Out On Trump Tariffs, Fears For Their Effect On U.S. Synth Manufacturing

first_imgRecently, synthesizer manufacturer Moog Music Inc. has denounced the 25% tariffs on Chinese electrical circuit boards and components by U.S. President Trump, which will take effect on July 6th. The company has noted that the tariff will increase the cost of building a synthesizer, putting the company at a disadvantage against other international manufacturers and threatening jobs among U.S. synth makers. With many U.S. companies priding themselves on being made in the U.S., those companies may be forced to relocate outside the country or have the bulk of their production done in China.As noted by Moog, 50% of all the components with a Moog synthesizer are from China. With such a high percentage of components coming directly from China—and therefore subject to the new tariffs—it’s easy to see why Moog and other U.S. synth companies will struggle to stay competitive with the tariffs enacted. Immediately, the tariffs could cause layoffs and force individual businesses like Moog to fold. In the long term, the tariffs could threaten the viability of production of U.S.-made synthesizers. These tariffs will not affect completed synthesizers that were fully made in China and exported to the U.S.Recently, the North Carolina-based company posted an open letter on its website, calling for fans and customers to speak out against the tariffs and write to state representatives to convey their opposition. As they explained,We need your help. A U.S. tariff (import tax) on Chinese circuit boards and associated components is expected to take effect on July 6, 2018.These tariffs will immediately and drastically increase the cost of building our instruments, and have the very real potential of forcing us to lay off workers and could (in a worst case scenario) require us to move some, if not all, of our manufacturing overseas.There is one thing all of us can do together to try and stop this: Write to our elected officials.They also attached a fully written form letter for advocates to use, which notes that Moog synthesizers have been used by Michael Jackson, The Beatles, Radiohead, Stevie Wonder, and many others. You can check out the full form letter below, and head to Moog’s website here for full instructions on how to get involved.Dear (Congressman or Representative):I am writing you on behalf of Moog Music, a company of 100 employee-owners, based in Asheville, North Carolina. I am urgently contacting you about the recently announced 25% tariff on Chinese goods.In case you are not familiar with Moog, they manufacture the world’s leading analog synthesizers used by artists including but not limited to Michael Jackson,The Beatles, Radiohead, Stevie Wonder and many others.Roughly half of the circuit boards and associated components for Moog’s instruments come from China. This tariff would significantly limit their ability to manufacture synthesizers, and could put many of their employee-owners out of a job.As an employee-owned company with a 60-year legacy in American manufacturing, Moog constantly strives to keep a balance between domestically- and internationally-sourced parts, so that they can continue employing people from their local community in Asheville, North Carolina.Moog sources circuit boards from US suppliers whenever possible, paying up to 30% over the price of the same circuit boards made overseas. However, whether they buy circuit boards in the US or overseas, the majority of the raw components still come from China. Therefore, Moog will be unable to avoid this substantial cost increase because of the tariffs.These tariffs will immediately and drastically increase the cost of building Moog instruments, forcing them to lay off American workers and will require Moog to move some, if not all, of their manufacturing overseas.I do not want to see the end of Moog’s 60-year legacy in American manufacturing. I do not want  their employee-owners left without jobs. I want American workers to continue have the opportunity to support their families and their community.I implore you to convince the President that these Chinese tariffs cause serious damage to American workers like those at Moog and to rescind them immediately.Thank you,(Your Name)[H/T Ask Audio]last_img read more

Read more

Ghost Light Performs “Best Kept Secret” & “Isosceles” At KBCO Studio C [Video]

first_imgIn late-March, Ghost Light released their long-awaited debut studio album, Best Kept Secrets. The album has been in the works for the better part of two years. During their time on the road since work on the project began, Ghost Light has become one of the most exciting and in-demand live bands on the circuit.Recently, Ghost Light stopped by Denver, CO’s commercial radio station, KBCO, to record a special KBCO Studio C session. The quintet worked through live renditions of lead single “Best Kept Secret” and “Isosceles” from their recently released studio debut, Best Kept Secrets.Head here to watch Ghost Light’s recent KBCO Studio C session.Ghost Light’s 2019 spring tour continues on Wednesday, April 10th, with a stop at St. Louis, MO’s Old Rock House. For a full list of upcoming dates, see below. For more information and ticketing, head to the band’s website.Ghost Light 2019 Tour Dates:4/10 – St. Louis, MO – Old Rock House4/11 – Columbus, OH – Woodlands Tavern4/12 – Louisville, KY – Zanzabar4/13 – Covington, KY – Madison Live4/16 – Nashville, TN – Basement East4/17 – Asheville, NC – Asheville Music Hall4/18 – Charleston, SC – Pour House4/19 – Atlanta, GA – Terminal West4/20 – Charlotte, NC – Visulite Theatre4/24 – Birmingham, AL – Zydeco4/25 – Jackson, MS – Duling Hall4/27 – New Orleans, LA – Republic NOLA4/29 – Atlanta, GA –5/9 – Hamden, CT – Space Ballroom5/10 – Brooklyn, NY – Brooklyn Bowl5/11 – Portland, ME – Portland House of Music5/15 – Providence, RI – Columbus Theatre5/16 – Boston, MA – Paradise Rock Club5/17 – Asbury Park, NJ – Wonder Bar5/18 – Washington, DC – The Hamilton5/19 – Corolla, NC – Mike Dianna’s Grill Room5/24 – 5/26 – Long Creek, SC – Long Creek Music Festival5/24 – 5/26 – Chillicothe, IL – Summer Camp Music Festival5/25 – Martinsville, VA – Rooster Walk Music & Arts Festival6/6 – 6/8 – Wellston, MI – Camp Greensky Music Festival6/6 – 6/9 – Stephentown, NY – Disc Jam6/27 – 6/30 – Rothbury, MI – Electric Forest Festival7/5 – Boulder, CO – Boulder Theater7/18 – 7/21 – North Plains, OR – Northwest String Summit7/20 – Roseberry, ID – Summer Music Festival at Roseberry7/25 – 7/28 – Scranton, PA – Peach Music Festival7/26 – 7/27 – Burlington, VT – Tumble Down Festival8/2 – Johnstown, PA – Flood City Music Festival9/22 – East Aurora, NY – Borderlands Music FestivalView Tour DatesFans heading down to New Orleans during this year’s New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival can catch Ghost Light performing a late-night show on Saturday, April 27th (technically early-morning on April 28th) at Republic NOLA. The Ghost Light late-night will immediately follow Tom Hamilton‘s performance with Joe Russo’s Almost Dead at Mardi Gras World.Tickets for Ghost Light’s New Orleans late-night during Jazz Fest are available here.Date: Saturday, April 27th, 2019 (technically early AM 4/28)Artist: Live For Live Music & 8th Annual Nolafunk Series During Jazz Fest Present: GHOST LIGHTVenue: Republic NOLA – 828 S Peters St, New Orleans, LA 70130Tickets: Early-Bird – $20 (limited quantity) / Tier 1 – $22.50 (limited quantity / Tier 2 – $25Time: 2:00 AMFor more information, head here.last_img read more

Read more

Cynthia Friend named director of the Rowland Institute

first_imgCynthia Friend, Theodore William Richards Professor of Chemistry and Professor of Materials Science at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), has been named as the next director of the Rowland Institute at Harvard. Friend brings extensive leadership experience to the directorship, having previously served as associate director of the Harvard Materials Science and Engineering Center, associate dean in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS), chair of the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, and associate laboratory director for Photon Science at the SLAC Linear Accelerator Center.As director of the Rowland Institute, Friend will work closely with both Cherry A. Murray, dean of SEAS, and Jeremy Bloxham, dean of science in FAS, to ensure the Rowland’s continued success as a forum for scientific exploration, creativity, and innovation.In 2009, Friend was elected a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the American Chemical Society. She has received recognition for her research in chemical approaches to reducing energy usage from numerous academic societies and institutions, including the Olah Award for Hydrocarbon Chemistry. Friend received her Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley in 1981 and joined the Harvard faculty in 1982. She was appointed as associate professor in 1986, and became a full professor in 1989.“Cynthia brings to the directorship of the Rowland exceptional understanding of interdisciplinary scientific research and a pragmatic, open, and thoughtful style that has enabled her to effectively manage across constituencies,” said Michael D. Smith, dean of FAS. Read Full Storylast_img read more

Read more