Starry Noises Off Revival Extends on Broadway

first_img Andrea Martin, Megan Hilty and a slew of sardines will be remaining on Broadway just a little bit longer. Noises Off is now scheduled to run through March 13; the limited engagement had previously been set to end on March 6. The revival officially opened on January 14 at the American Airlines Theatre.Helmed by Jeremy Herrin, Noises Off follows a director and his group of actors just hours before the opening night performance of the farce Nothing On. Lines are forgotten, love triangles are unraveling and sardines are flying everywhere. The comedy premiered on the Great White Way in 1983 and was nominated for the Tony Award for Best Play. It was first revived on Broadway in 2001 with a cast that included Patti LuPone and a recent inhabitant of the American Airlines Theatre: Peter Gallagher.The cast also includes Rob McClure, Tim Allgood, Campbell Scott, Tracee Chimo, Daniel Davis, David Furr, Kate Jennings Grant and Jeremy Shamos. Star Files Andrea Martin View Comments Megan Hilty Noises Off Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on March 13, 2016 Daniel Davis, Kate Jennings Grant, Andrea Martin, Campbell Scott & Megan Hilty in ‘Noises Off'(Photo by Joan Marcus)last_img read more

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GREEN MOUNTAIN POWER 9.09 PERCENT RATE INCREASE APPROVED

first_img            Green Mountain Power rates rose less than three percent betweenJanuary 2001 and the present increase, reflecting the success of our operationalefforts and the price stability offered by Green Mountain Power’slong-term contracts with the Vermont Yankee nuclear plant and with Hydro Quebec.             “This rate increase is driven by rising wholesalepower and transmission costs,” said Green Mountain Power president andchief executive officer Christopher L. Dutton. “Fortunately, through our continuedefforts to become more effective, we’ve been able to hold our other costsflat overall.” GREENMOUNTAIN POWER9.09PERCENT RATE INCREASE APPROVED Rising energy costs are driving up rates for other utilitiesin Vermont, New Englandand across the country. In Vermont,rate hikes approved in the last year ranged from four percent to 23 percent. InNew England, rate hikes pending or approved inthe last year were as high as 52 percent.  CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The materials in this electronic mailtransmission (including all attachments) are private and confidential and arethe property of the sender. The information contained in the material may beprivileged and is intended only for the use of the named addressees above. Ifyou have received this email in error, please immediately notify the sender bytelephone (802) 655-8420 or send an email [email protected](link sends e-mail).  Thank you.             For more information, please call Dorothy Schnure, Manager,Corporate Communications, (802) 450-2213.             Green Mountain Power is the first electric utility in thestate to file a plan under this statute, which established a public policy goalof separating the financial success of a utility from increased electricitysales, thereby removing potential barriers to energy conservation. v\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);}o\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);}w\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);}.shape {behavior:url(#default#VML);}st1\:*{behavior:url(#default#ieooui) } -30-             “This new regulatory framework creates some immediatebenefits for our customers, in that this rate increase is slightly lower thanit would have been without the efficiency savings built into this plan. Webelieve that as we move forward, the streamlined cost recovery and efficiencyincentives built into the plan will help us control costs and serve ourcustomers even better,” said Mr. Dutton.             COLCHESTER, VT…Green Mountain Power(NYSE:GMP) received on Friday approval from the Vermont Public Service Board toincrease its rates by 9.09 percent for electricity used beginning January 1,2007. The Board also approved a plan to establish a new regulatory frameworkfor the Company, as encouraged last year by the Legislature. The Company andthe Vermont Department of Public Service earlier this year reached a settlementagreement on both the rate increase and the alternative regulation plan.             The new regulatory framework approved by the Vermont PublicService Board this week streamlines the regulatory process and createsincentives for the Company to become even more efficient. The Board retains allauthority to review Company costs and set rates, but it can do so on a moreregular basis. SharonA. LuciaParalegalGreen Mountain Power163 Acorn LaneColchester, VT  05446802-655-8425Fax #[email protected](link sends e-mail)             The average bill for a Green Mountain Power residentialcustomer using 500 kilowatthours a month will increase by $6.19 per month, from$68.03 to $74.22. NEWS                                                                          FORIMMEDIATE RELEASE#31-06                                                                                      December22, 2006last_img read more

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Clarity Through Suffering

first_imgPhoto cred: Ashley WoodringThis past weekend had an unexpected twist for me.  I was registered to compete for the seventh time in the annual Jerry’s Baddle race in Saluda, NC.  The plan was to do the Green River Narrows kayak portion of this biathlon and tag my buddy Ian to complete the brutal 26 mile bike leg of the race.Unfortunately for me, Ian had a hip injury a few days before the event, and I was out one partner and still registered for the event.  After a fruitless search for another partner, and considering all of the smack talk from my friends, it quickly became apparent that I needed to step up to the plate and race the whole thing solo.In case you’re not familiar with this race and this course, the first stretch of the bike portion is a brutal climb up and out of Green River Cove Road on a never-ending series of switchbacks that gain over 1000 feet of elevation in very little distance.  I am not a road biker by any means, so I was definitely dreading this portion of the day.My buddy Ben Blake let me use his towny Cannondale bike for the race, and I was ready to rip!  2.5 hours of suffering, here we come.The beautiful thing about Jerry’s Baddle is the community that surrounds it.  Check out the Festivals article in this month’s issue of the magazine for more, but this race centers around a fallen friend, and fighting against the disease that took him.  Time spent outside exerting yourself is such a great way to honor a friend’s memory.Before I knew it, I was on the course.  A couple of bobbles in the rapids below Gorilla, and a frantic portage around the right side of the unrunnable Nutcracker rapid, and I was back in the water with the major boating obstacles behind me.  I hit the transition area breathless, and clumsily got into my biking gear.I hit the road motivated and excited to try something new (it was my 2nd time on a road bike), but the spirit started to get crushed out of me as soon as I hit the switchbacks.  I consider myself to be in reasonable shape from my kayaking fitness regimen, but this was full-on and unbridled trial by fire on the bike.  I had to reach deep inside just to keep those pedal cranks spinning.  It is a humbling feeling when you reach the redline for your heart rate and breath, especially at the very beginning of a long track.As other racers passed me and I existed in my own little world of pain, I started to have some revelations.  First of all, I realized that I had traveled effortlessly up these switchbacks thousands of times in vehicles powered by internal combustion engines on the Green River shuttle.  If it took this much energy to power my body and bike up this hill, how much energy could it possibly take to transport a multi-thousand pound car?  There are a lot of things that we take for granted.My mind also shifted back to the reason for the race.  I clearly wasn’t in contention for the win out there, but just the ability to paddle that river and ride that course was a privilege that not everyone enjoys.  That day, we were all riding for those who suffer from ALS and cannot ride.  Many of these people would have given anything for the vivid exertion and present-moment existence that I was leading as I crept up the hill with my vision blurred.After a 30+ minute struggle with the initial hill, things stabilized.  I admittedly got a bit lost on the course, but at that point it was all about the journey and not so much about the destination.  I still tried to push myself as hard as I would have had I been in a fight for the win, but I had a blast bombing down the steep downhills at over 40 miles per hour, and encouraging the faster racers as they passed me on the uphills.After a grinding final stretch, I finished the race with a total time of 2:29.  I couldn’t have a logical conversation with anyone for maybe 20 minutes after finishing, but with a bit of graciously donated food and beer in my body, I started to feel a bit better.As more of a sprint athlete, I don’t often experience extended physical suffering for long periods of time like I did in Jerry’s Baddle.  In spite of the discomfort, being alone with your thoughts in a world of physical exertion and hurt can be very purifying and rewarding.  It’s nothing but you, your heartrate, your breath, and your thoughts.We’ll see if that theory holds true in this upcoming weekend’s Bearwallow Beast 5k.  I hope to see you out there!last_img read more

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Credit Union difference blindsides bankers

first_imgby: Jim NussleFrank Keating really fumbled his assessment of how credit unions work (After the NFL Decision, It’s Time for Credit Unions to Stop Abusing the Tax Code, Roll Call, May 8) – but it’s par for the course with the bankers. The fact of the matter is Congress provided credit unions a federal tax-exemption because of their not-for-profit, member-owned cooperative structure. This structure allows credit unions to have a real impact on the financial lives of consumers.The credit union tax status benefits all consumers – credit union members and nonmembers alike – to the tune of $10 billion a year nationally because credit unions are fulfilling their special mission to serve Americans.Credit unions take that mission seriously. That’s one of the reasons not-for-profit financial institutions approve 64 percent of mortgage applications from low and moderate income borrowers and that 49 percent of credit union branches are located in Community Development Financial Institution investment areas.Credit unions aren’t turning a profit to fatten the pockets of Wall Street banks – they’re returning earnings to their members in the form of better rates and lower fees. These local institutions provide more competition in the financial market, driving down the banking costs for consumers. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Is your certificate promotion doing what you want?

first_img continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr As liquidity and cost of funds pressures continue to be a focus, credit unions are exploring possible funding options within the liquidity toolbox. Among them, certificate promotions which, in this rate environment, are becoming a more frequently used tool.On the surface, attracting liquidity through certificates seems straightforward. Offer a competitive rate, promote it, and the dollars typically come in with ease. However, before rolling out that next certificate promotion, there are several important items to consider to make it as effective as possible.For example, has the credit union run a what-if and do the right decision-makers understand the impact of the certificate promotion potentially cannibalizing existing low-cost deposits? This challenge has been addressed in previous blogs, specifically the one titled Hidden Cost of Addressing Liquidity Needs.last_img read more

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DOT workers clearing roads around the clock

first_img“You figure, if you’ve got three storms worth of salt on hand, we’ve got three days of heavy snow worth of salt, times three, on hand,” said Cook. The behemoth plow can take up to two lanes and a shoulder. After plowing the snow, however, salt is thrown onto the roads, which the DOT has plenty of. This year, the DOT is introducing a new piece of equipment, moving snow off the roads faster than ever. “We always have at least three storms worth of salt on hand,” said Cook. KIRKWOOD (WBNG) — When the snow hits, working at the Department of Transportation isn’t an easy job. With over 900 miles to cover, the 24/7 job never stops. “We go into snow and ice season before the snow even starts to fall,” said Scott Cook, the NYSDOT Region 9 public information officer. “We have people ready to go on 12 hours shifts, so we have people on the clock, around the clock, 24 hours a day. We have drivers and mechanics always in the shops or in the trucks, ready to go.”center_img “When it comes to the interstates, say you’ve got a three land highway. We’ve got one truck that can take care of that, it’s called a tow plow,” said Cook. Exactly how much is three storms worth of salt? When the storm hits, they have to prepare well in advance. According to Cook, the DOT always contacts their fuel suppliers prior to a storm, so that all trucks are completely full. Even if it’s raining, DOT workers will be out putting salt down, to prevent roads from freezing. It’s all to make sure you’re safe, so you can get to where you’re going.last_img read more

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25 Things You Don’t Know About Me

first_img8. My most used emoji is the heart.9. I was a hand model in a Barbie commercial that only aired in China.10. Dog adoption is definitely the cause closest to my heart, [which is why] I teamed up with Subaru to spread awareness and to really encourage people to #MakeADogsDay.11. My first concert was Britney Spears at Madison Square Garden.12. I like to be anywhere with a warm beach.13. Yoga is my go-to workout.14. I love to play the piano.15. Growing up, I wanted to be a lawyer, mainly because my parents were lawyers.16. The best advice I ever received was: Let go and have things come as they are.17. My first trip to Paris was the most memorable trip I’ve been on.18. I’ve heard people think I look like Tiffani Thiessen.19. I love going to the park with my dog, Levon, or going on hikes with him.20. My must-have beauty item is an eyebrow pencil. If I don’t do anything else in the morning, I’ll use [just that].21. I used to have posters of Dave Matthews Band and American Beauty up on my walls.22. If I were competing on a reality show, it would be The Bachelorette. I’d love to create some friendly drama on the show.23. My favorite holiday is New Year’s.24. During quarantine, I’ve learned how to rely on people around me more [and] that it’s very important to ask for help when you need it. It’s really brought me closer to my friends.25. If I weren’t an actress, I’d probably be doing something with kids. I’d love to teach kids acting. I think that would be really fun.For more on Daddario’s partnership with Subaru’s pet adoption initiative, visit subaru.com/makeadogsday.Listen to Us Weekly’s Hot Hollywood as each week the editors of Us break down the hottest entertainment news stories! – Advertisement – Acting isn’t the only thing Alexandra Daddario loves. The actress, who is best remembered for her roles in the Percy Jackson film series and in 2017’s Baywatch, exclusively opened up to Us Weekly with 25 things you might not know about her — including her love for dogs, reality TV and food. Read on to learn more about the 34-year-old star.1. I love sushi.- Advertisement – 5. My favorite show as a kid was Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman, the one with Teri Hatcher and Dean Cain.6. My guilty pleasure is eating an entire pint of ice cream and [watching] reality TV.7. When I was 15, I worked in an ice cream shop.- Advertisement – 2. My first car was a 2009 Nissan Sentra that I drove until it stopped going above 40 mph.3. My favorite role to date was Annabeth in [2010’s] Percy Jackson & the Olympians: The Lightning Thief because that was really my big break.4. I have “Reaper” by Sia on repeat right now.- Advertisement –last_img read more

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Governor Wolf Orders Flags to Remain at Half-Staff to Honor the Victims of the Attack in Baton Rouge, Louisiana

first_img July 19, 2016 Flag Order,  Press Release Harrisburg, PA – In accordance with the President Barack Obama’s proclamation, Governor Tom Wolf has ordered all United States and Commonwealth flags at the Capitol Complex, Commonwealth facilities, and all public buildings and grounds throughout the state to remain lowered to half-staff to honor the victims of the July 17, 2016 attack in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.Flags will return to full-staff at sunset on July 22, 2016 per the President’s order.All Pennsylvanians are invited to participate in this tribute.Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf Governor Wolf Orders Flags to Remain at Half-Staff to Honor the Victims of the Attack in Baton Rouge, Louisianacenter_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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Former Gold Coast display home now up for grabs

first_img17 Elvire St, Ormeau Hills. 17 Elvire St, Ormeau Hills. 17 Elvire St, Ormeau Hills.It sits on a 400sq m elevated block, which makes the most of the hills views.A combined kitchen, living and dining area is at the heart of the home, which opens up onto an outdoor entertaining deck through floor-to-ceiling stacking glass doors.A media room and study are also on the ground floor.The second level is dedicated to five bedrooms as well as a family living area.It also has a double garage. 17 Elvire St, Ormeau Hills.center_img 17 Elvire St, Ormeau Hills.More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa18 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag2 days agoWhile it was built in 2015, marketing agent Jenni Wright, of Lucy Cole Prestige, said it was yet to be lived in so it was basically a brand new house.She said the two-storey home was ideal for buyers wanting plenty of space with a low-maintenance lifestyle.“It’s got a really nice feel when you walk in,” Mrs Wright said.“The entry is really nice, it has a beautiful, quality kitchen and it’s got a nice view to the hills.“It would suit someone scaling down, a young family or an investor.” 17 Elvire St, Ormeau Hills.NEUTRAL tones with splashes of wood, glass and stone give this Ormeau Hills home a modern elegance.The former display home at 17 Elvire St showcases contemporary living at its best with an open floorplan and minimalist style.last_img read more

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Airport security scans: What would your doctor do?

first_img Share 50 Views   no discussions Tweet LifestyleTravel Airport security scans: What would your doctor do? by: – March 31, 2011 Sharing is caring!center_img Share (CNN) — I was in the security line at an airport a few months ago when I watched a fellow passenger do something I’d never seen done before: He dissed the scan.“I’d like to opt out,” he said, as a security agent went scurrying for a male agent to give this man a full-body pat-down, the requirement for anyone who refuses to go through the full-body scanner.Wow, I thought, this man really must want to avoid the scanner if he’s willing to get groped by a total stranger.The Transportation Security Administration says the so-called backscatter scans, which emit a small amount of radiation, are safe. “Multiple independent studies have confirmed that the technology used to protect passengers when they fly is safe for their health,” says TSA spokesman Nicholas Kimball. “TSA takes many precautions to regularly verify that all machines are operating properly.”Another type of airport scanner uses “millimeter wave” technology, which uses electromagnetic waves and has not raised the same level of public concerns as the backscatter scans.So why all the worry? In my obnoxious journalist way, I pounced on the guy to ask him why he’d done it.“I’m a doctor at M.D. Anderson, and I don’t want radiation if I can avoid it,” he said.I was next in line. I’d just watched a doctor at M.D. Anderson, a top cancer hospital, opt out because he wanted to avoid radiation. Does that mean I should, too? I had a second to make a decision. I decided to opt out, too.The pat-down, I learned, is not such an easy option. First, you have to make a bit of a spectacle of yourself by publicly asking for something different. Secondly, it takes time (not a lot, but enough to be a problem if you’re running late) and thirdly, I ended up being touched in places previously reserved for my husband and my gynecologist.I began to wonder if the doctor was being a little paranoid. Was the radiation so dangerous that it was worth the hassle and embarrassment? To get a little perspective, when I returned home I randomly asked doctors I respect what they do in the security line. It was a completely unscientific sampling, but it yielded this interesting result: All these doctors are smart people with access to the same scientific data, and yet made very different choices.Doctors who say “yes” to the scannersI started, of course, with my colleague Dr. Sanjay Gupta, a neurosurgeon, who told me he hasn’t opted out thus far.Many other doctors feel the same way.“I go through them,” said Dr. Greg Zorman, chief of neurosurgery at Memorial Healthcare System in Florida. “The amount of radiation you get isn’t worth worrying about.”Dr. Drew Pinsky, an internist and host of a new show on HLN that makes its debut on April 4, called the amount of radiation “inconsequential.”The radiation you get from a backscatter imaging machine used at many airports is the same amount of radiation you get from sitting on an airplane for two minutes, according to research released this week by the University of California San Francisco.The researchers calculated for every 100 million passengers who fly seven one-way flights a year, six of them could get cancer as a result of the radiation exposure from the full-body scans.The California researchers made these calculations based on information from the manufacturers. Some researchers question whether the manufacturers’ measurements are valid. David Brenner, director of the Center for Radiological Research at Columbia University, says he thinks the exposure to radiation is actually 10 times more than what the manufacturers claim.Even so, Brenner (who’s a physicist, not a medical doctor) still goes through the scanners at airports because even by his calculations the amount of radiation is still small.Doctors who say “no” to the scannersDr. Otis Brawley, chief medical officer of the American Cancer Society, takes a pat-down instead of going through a scanner when he travels. He says he’s concerned about whether the machines are calibrated and inspected properly.“USA Today did a piece on how badly TSA maintained their X-ray equipment for carryon bags, and this gave me little confidence,” he wrote to me in an e-mail.Brawley’s deputy concurs.“I do whatever I can to avoid the scanner,” Dr. Len Lichtenfeld wrote to me in an e-mail.He says as a frequent flier, he’s concerned about the cumulative effect of the radiation.“This is a total body scan — not a dental or chest X-ray,” he wrote to me. “Total body radiation is not something I find very comforting based on my medical knowledge.”Lichtenfeld says it doesn’t necessarily give him great comfort that the TSA says the scans are safe.“I can still remember getting my feet radiated as a child when I went to the shoe store and they had a machine which could see how my foot fit in the new shoes,” he says. “We were told then that they were safe, and they were not.”(At first I thought Lichtenfeld was making this up, but you can actually see one of these foot scanners at the Museum of Questionable Medical Devices at the Science Museum of Minnesota.)Another doctor who opts for the pat-down is Dr. Dong Kim, Rep. Gabrielle Giffords’ neurosurgeon.“There is really no absolutely safe dose of radiation,” says Kim, chair of the department of neurosurgery at the University of Texas Medical School. “Each exposure is additive, and there is no need to incur any extra radiation when there is an alternative.”This was echoed by several other physicians, including Dr. Andrew Weil.“All radiation exposure adds to the cumulative total you’ve received over your lifetime,” Weil wrote to me in an e-mail. “Cancer risks correlate with that number, so no dose of radiation is too small to matter.”Doctors exposed to radiation at work are particularly sensitive to this issue, as I learned when I got through security that day in the airport and chased after the doctor who’d opted out.I learned his name is Dr. Karl Bilimoria, and he’s a surgical oncology fellow at M.D. Anderson. He says this is a frequent topic of discussion among his colleagues.“If we can avoid a little radiation in exchange for the two extra minutes needed for a pat-down, then we will,” he says.By Elizabeth Cohen, CNN News Sharelast_img read more

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