Community / ED Radiologist

first_imgThe Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine at theUniversity Of Maryland School Of Medicine seeks a full-time,faculty member to expand our team of Community RadiologySpecialists for ED professional services for the Department’s onand off-site ED departments. The successful candidate will have adistinguishing blend of experience in general radiology and theopportunity to focus on sub-specialty areas of concentratedinterest.This position is for a board certified, fellowship-trainedRadiologist with strong interests in ED operations to provideon-site and remote coverage for multiple locations. Our clinicalnetwork is linked to the University Of Maryland Medical Center, theheart of the University of Maryland Medical System’s Baltimorecampus, by an enterprise-wide EMR driven PACS system, supported byvoice recognition dictation with seamless interoperability.The potential start date is January 2020. Graduating fellows thatcan start in July 2020 will also be considered. Work schedule willhave a strong focus on sustainability and a favorable work/lifebalance. Candidates should be comfortable with the broad scope ofED radiology (plain film, CT, and ultrasound). Experience withNeuro MR is a plus. There are no procedures, nuclear medicine, ormammo requirements.Qualifications :Competitive salary and comprehensive benefits are proudly offered.Faculty rank is commensurate with candidate’s qualifications andexperience. Expected rank is Assistant Professor or higher,however, rank and tenure status is dependent on candidate’squalifications. Please send CV with cover letter of interest to theattention of Barbara Stewart at [email protected] , or fax410-328-0641, or mail:Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear MedicineUniversity of Maryland Medical Center, Rm N2E2322 South Greene StreetBaltimore, MD 21201The University of Maryland, Baltimore is an Equal Opportunity,Affirmative Action Employer. Minorities, women, individuals withdisabilities, and protected veterans are encouraged toapply.Application through Taleo :Community / ED Radiologisthttps://umb.taleo.net/careersection/jobdetail.ftl?job=190000IJ7&lang=enlast_img read more

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Press release: More victims and their families get justice

first_imgThe Attorney General’s Office helped more victims and their families get justice last year, after 137 criminals had their sentences increased under the Unduly Lenient Sentence (ULS) scheme.New statistics out today 2017 Unduly Lenient Sentence Scheme statistics (MS Excel Spreadsheet, 29.3KB) reveal the Law Officers (Attorney and Solicitor General) referred 173 sentences to the Court of Appeal in 2017 because they believed them to be far too low.The ULS scheme allows victims of crime, prosecutors and members of the public to ask for certain Crown Court sentences to be reviewed if they think the sentence is far too low. The Law Officers then ask the Court of Appeal to review the sentence to have it increased if they believe the judge made a gross error in sentencing.Sentences were increased for crimes including murder, manslaughter, rape and other serious sexual offences, causing death by dangerous driving, modern slavery, false imprisonment, child cruelty, burglary, robbery, perverting the course of justice, and drugs.Of the 137 offenders who had their sentences increased, these related to crimes in the following categories: Rape and serious sexual offences (58), homicide and related (15), acquisitive offences (such as burglary, theft, and fraud) (19), serious assault offences (19), firearm-related (8), drug-related (4), kidnap and false imprisonment (2), and other offences (12).The Solicitor General Robert Buckland QC MP said: In 2017, 943 referrals were received by the Attorney General’s Office, a slight increase from the 837 referrals the previous year. The Attorney and Solicitor General referred 173 sentences to the Court of Appeal that they thought needed looking at again, compared to 190 in 2016.137 sentences resulting in increases is a very small proportion of the 80,000 Crown Court cases heard each year, but the ULS scheme is there to allow adjustment of those sentences where an increase is warranted.The scheme was extended last year to include an additional 19 terror-related offences including supporting extremist organisations, encouraging acts of terrorism or failing to disclose information about a terrorist attack.The scheme was introduced after public outcry over the lenient sentencing of the offenders involved in the 1986 rape of 21 year old Jill Saward. The victim was brutally raped by a gang of robbers at her father’s vicarage.Anyone can ask for a Crown Court sentence to be reviewed and you can also follow the progress of referrals made to the Attorney General’s Office.There are only 28 days from the date of sentencing to refer a case to the Court of Appeal. This deadline cannot be extended. In order to ensure we have time to properly consider a case we ask that referrals are made early in the process.The ULS scheme only applies to certain Crown Court offences. Details of the offences that are covered by the ULS scheme are listed on our website. The Unduly Lenient Sentence scheme allows victims of crime, their families and the public to ask for a review of certain sentences that they believe are far too low. We only have 28 days from the date of sentencing to refer a case to the Court of Appeal. Unusually, there is no way to extend this deadline – this means we require a referral very early in the process to be able to deal with it in time. A sentencing exercise is not an exact science and in the vast majority of cases, judges get it right. For an offence there is a range within which a judge might sentence properly. The scheme is available to ensure that the Court of Appeal can review cases where there may have been a gross error in the sentencing decision.last_img read more

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Supermarket price war keeps food prices low

first_imgFood prices rose by just 0.6% last month – the lowest rise ever according to figures from the British Retail Consortium (BRC).It reported that food prices rose slightly – compared with non-food which saw the biggest monthly drop since December 2006.The organisation said the supermarket price war was keeping food price rises in check.Helen Dickinson, BRC director-general, said: “Fierce competition among grocers has driven food price inflation to record low levels and with some grocers having announced plans to keep prices down, consumers stand to benefit for a while to come.”Nielsen’s head of retail and business insight Mike Watkins said: “Food inflation is still low, many supermarkets are price cutting and non-food prices remain deflationary, so the high street continues to generate little inflationary pressure.”Last week, grocery share figures from Kantar Worldpanel, showed a growth in the market to 2.8%, and equally low inflation rates of 0.8%.last_img read more

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Tedeschi Trucks Band Appears On ‘The Howard Stern Show’ [Watch]

first_imgTedeschi Trucks Band recently stopped by radio host Howard Stern‘s New York City SiriusXM studio to record a pair of tunes on The Howard Stern Show. Tedeschi Trucks Band’s appearance on The Howard Stern Show is currently streaming exclusively through SiriusXM’s app.Husband-and-wife duo Derek Trucks and Susan Tedeschi’s 12-piece rock outfit crammed into Stern’s studio, with Stern and his longtime staff member Fred Norris listening along. Tedeschi Trucks Band worked through an electric take on “Hard Case”, off of the band’s recently released SIGNS album. Drummers Tyler Greenwell and J.J. Johnson were so short on space that the rhythmic duo had to play standing up. TTB also offered up a cover of Derek & The Dominos‘ “Keep On Growing”, a fan-favorite tune that the band regularly delivers in their live setting.Stern offered up some banter throughout the recent recording session, as he gave Tedeschi Trucks Band high-praise and was reminded of the Allman Brothers Band. Stern seemed to be a little confused with his ABB history though, as he referenced Derek Trucks being original drummer Butch Trucks‘ son (Derek is Butch’s nephew).Watch clips of Tedeschi Trucks Band performing “Hard Case” and “Keep On Growing” below, and head to SiriusXM’s app to check out the entirety of the performance.Tedeschi Trucks Band – “Hard Case”[Video: The Howard Stern Show]Tedeschi Trucks Band – “Keep On Growing”[Video: The Howard Stern Show]Tedeschi Trucks Band heads across the pond for their spring European tour beginning on Tuesday, April 2nd in Paris, France. For a full list of Tedeschi Trucks Band’s upcoming tour dates, head to the band’s website here.last_img read more

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Eight from Harvard elected to American Philosophical Society

first_imgThe American Philosophical Society, the oldest learned society in the United States, recently elected eight new members from Harvard into this year’s class of scholars.The society, founded in 1743 by Benjamin Franklin for the purpose of “promoting useful knowledge,” honors and engages distinguished scientists, humanists, social scientists, and leaders in civic and cultural affairs through elected membership and opportunities for interdisciplinary, intellectual fellowship, particularly in the semiannual meetings in Philadelphia. Since 1900, more than 240 members have received the Nobel Prize.This year’s elected members from Harvard follow:Mathematical and Physical Sciences (Class 1): Lisa Randall, Frank B. Baird Jr. Professor of Science in the Department of Physics, and Shlomo Zvi Sternberg, George Putnam Professor of Pure and Applied Mathematics in the Mathematics Department.Biological Sciences (Class 2): Gregory A. Petsko, lecturer on neurology at Harvard Medical School.Social Sciences (Class 3): Cass R. Sunstein, administrator of the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs; Felix Frankfurter Professor of Law (on leave) at Harvard Law School, and Laurence H. Tribe, Carl M. Loeb University Professor, Harvard Law School.Humanities (Class 4): Janet Browne, Aramont Professor of the History of Science in the Department of the History of Science; and Jeffrey F. Hamburger, Kuno Francke Professor of German Art and Culture in the Department of History of Art and Architecture.The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs (Class 5): Martha Minow, dean of the Faculty of Law and Jeremiah Smith Jr. Professor of Law at Harvard Law School.last_img read more

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Community reaction critical to rebuilding lives of child soldiers

first_imgHow accepting or hostile a community is toward former child soldiers can help determine whether they will fare well or reoffend, according to Theresa Betancourt, associate professor of child health and human rights at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and director of the Research Program on Children and Global Adversity at the François-Xavier Bagnoud Center for Health and Human Rights at HSPH.Betancourt discussed her views on rehabilitating former child soldiers in an October 3, 2012 article in The Globe and Mail (Canada). According to the article, Omar Khadr was captured in 2002 on an Afghanistan battlefield as an al-Qaeda combatant when he was 15. He later pled guilty to killing a U.S. soldier, and is currently in rehabilitation in Canada after 10 years in prison in Guantanamo Bay.When the community is accepting, a former child soldier generally does well and is less likely to reoffend. However, when the community is accusatory, provokes the young person, or saddles him with negative reactions, “it makes it much harder for a person with significant trauma history to reintegrate well,” said Betancourt.With proper support and therapy, however, “Young people have the capacity to redirect their life trajectories toward something much more positive, even with horrendous trauma histories,” she said.last_img read more

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Students create Notre Dame Puerto Rican Student Association in the face of natural disasters, misconceptions

first_imgPhoto courtesy of Alvaro Carrillo Members of the recently-established Puerto Rican Student Association raised money in LaFortune to aid the disaster-stricken U.S. territory.In the face of these issues, a group of students from Puerto Rico decided to create the Notre Dame Puerto Rican Student Association in order to raise funds for disaster relief and increase awareness about Puerto Rico’s situation and culture.“With these recent events that have happened in Puerto Rico, I saw a lot of Puerto Rican student associations all around the nation moving and raising a lot of money to help Puerto Rico,” Carrillo, who serves as the Puerto Rico Student Association’s president, said. “So, I talked with my best friend, Adolfo Serbia, and we decided we had to do something.”The club was approved in December, and since then, the Puerto Rican Student Association has mobilized to raise funds for disaster relief, hosting two fundraising events in LaFortune Student Center and Five Guys at Eddy Street.“People were really receptive to our campaign,” Carrillo said. “We recently had a fundraiser at LaFortune. In only two hours, we raised $500 in cash and are still waiting for the University to tell us how much we raised in Domer Dollars. The one in Five Guys was very successful as well, we gained 20% of all the sales’ proceeds.”The funds raised through these events will be donated to local nonprofits Casa Pueblo and Instituto Nuevo Escuela. Carrillo said the association chose these organizations due to their known success and education initiatives in Puerto Rico.Even though the Puerto Rican Student Association’s immediate focus has been on raising funds, a core part of its mission is to increase awareness of Puerto Rican culture on campus.“Unfortunately, this is a campus that lacks a lot of diversity, so the best way to tackle this is by hosting events, bringing speakers, doing fundraisers, really everything that can expose our culture to students here on campus,” Carrillo said.‘We are Puerto Rican, but we are also United States citizens’Freshman Amaury Amador already realized there are many misconceptions surrounding Puerto Rican culture at Notre Dame.“There’s a lot of misinformation about what people perceive about Puerto Rico versus what we grow up to believe,” Amador said.The main misconception Amador notices is the widespread belief that Puerto Ricans are international students.“Sometimes they see us as strangers, but, even though we are not a state, we are part of the United States and we definitely still get treated like second-class citizens,” Amador said.The political situation between Puerto Rico and the United States is historically complex. The island is considered an unincorporated territory which is under U.S. control, which means the country’s constitution only partially applies to Puerto Rico. However, the territory is still under the jurisdiction and sovereignty of the federal government.“We are U.S. citizens, we have fought in the army and have fought in all the wars the U.S. has been involved in after the 18th century,” Carrillo said. “We can’t vote for the president even though we are a U.S. territory. We don’t have a vote in Congress even though we get taxed and regulated by Congress. So you can say Puerto Rico is a colony.”Puerto Rico’s political situation has given rise to contentions between the territory and the federal government, especially in regards to the government’s response to natural disasters in the Caribbean island.“You would think it was preposterous if New York City stayed without electricity for six months, but then you have San Juan spending almost a year without power, and no one batted an eye,” Amador said.Even though Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico almost three years ago, federal aid has been slow in entering the island. In January of 2019, President Trump released billions of dollars in aid to Puerto Rico. The $8 billion allocated through the Department of Housing and Urban Development was supposed to be released months ago, according to Reuters.However, Carrillo noted these efforts have been painfully slow and long overdue.“After Hurricane Maria, the response by the federal government was horrible,” he said. “We didn’t receive even 10% of the recognized damage assessments. When you compare this reaction to the one the federal government had with Hurricane Harvey in Texas, it was completely different.“You hope the government can bounce back, but they don’t have the financial tools. Then you hope the federal government responds and sends money, but they don’t.”The Puerto Rican government has not been able to deal with the natural disasters’ aftermath appropriately either, Amador said.“The [Puerto Rican] government has not done much to fix the situation because of the political problems,” Amador said. “It’s like ‘let’s not help the people. Let’s put a candidate’s name in the water bottles so the people know who they should vote for.’”Consequently, distrust for both the federal and local governments has grown over the years. As a result, Puerto Ricans have learned to “take matters into their own hands” when it comes to solving problems, Carrillo said.When the earthquakes began devastating the island’s southern region, Puerto Ricans rushed to aid their suffering countrymen.“Now with the earthquakes, huge traffic jams started to form from the northern part of the island to the south because people were taking food, water and baby formula to them,” Carrillo said.For Carrillo, this act of solidarity is a clear reflection of the Puerto Rican character.“These natural disasters make us come closer and bring out the best in everybody,” Carrillo said.Study first. Give back afterIn September 2017, both Amador and Carrillo witnessed Hurricane Maria’s devastation.Almost three years later, they — like many in the island — were woken by the earth’s shaking.“My house literally started shaking around 5 a.m,” Carrillo said. “I was terrified because we couldn’t understand what was happening.”Merely a week later, they bid farewell to their families and friends to come back to Notre Dame, fearing the uncertainty brought by the series of earthquakes.“It’s definitely hard because the earthquakes were in January and we left for college right after, so it was like leaving all your family over there without knowing what was going to happen,” Amador said.Yet their country’s mishaps have inspired them to continue studying in order to return to Puerto Rico upon graduation.“We want to use this opportunity of receiving a higher education to come back and work towards improving what the government has been unable to do,” Amador said.For the moment, the students are focusing on helping their country from across the sea.“We are using all the tools at our disposal, and that’s what the Puerto Rican Student Association stands for,” Carrillo said.Marisel Moreno, associate professor for Latinx literature, serves as the Puerto Rican Student Association’s faculty advisor. A Puerto Rican herself, Moreno said she admired the drive and initiative the students showed.“I am just so happy this is finally happening,” Moreno said. “I have been teaching at Notre Dame since 1998, and I have always dreamt of having a Puerto Rican Student Association — but all the effort truly comes from them.”Whether through raising funds or hosting events on campus to increase awareness, Carrillo said the group is not going to desist in its mission to increase Puerto Rico’s presence on campus.“We are definitely going to be hosting more events in the years to come and this is not a one-year thing,” Carrillo said. “We are going to keep moving forward so that, if anything happens to Puerto Rico, we are able to stand up and help our island.”Tags: casa pueblo, Hurricane María, instituto nueva escuela, puerto rican student association, Puerto Rico The heavy winds started around 4 a.m. on Sept. 20, 2017. An hour later, sophomore Alvaro Carrillo’s house lost power as Hurricane Maria tore through Puerto Rico.A high school senior at the time, Carrillo had to witness the destruction the storm wrought on his native land.His family’s house endured the 155 mile-per-hour winds. However, complications rose in the aftermath, as Puerto Rico was left in the shadows due to months-long power outages.“The bad things started to happen after Maria,” Carrillo said. “I live in San Juan, the capital of Puerto Rico, and we were the first to get power three months after the hurricane. You can imagine the people who live in the rural areas of Puerto Rico, where they did not receive electricity even a full year after Hurricane Maria.”Puerto Rico’s problems did not end — or start — with Hurricane Maria. A financial crisis was already crippling the island’s economy before Maria struck. Almost three years after the storm, Puerto Rico is now facing a different kind of natural disaster: earthquakes.“The problem is that Puerto Rico has not fully recovered,” Carrillo said. “So, you have a country that is $72 billion in debt and you hit them with a hurricane with a damage assessment surpassing $100 billion, and then with a sequence of earthquakes.”Since Dec. 29, the Caribbean island has been rattled with daily earthquakes. Hundreds of temblors have rocked the island, including Puerto Rico’s most destructive quake in a century — a 6.4 magnitude earthquake that jolted the whole island awake in the early hours of Jan. 7.last_img read more

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Tix Now Available for Nina Arianda-Led Fool for Love

first_img View Comments Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on Dec. 13, 2015 Fool For Love Tickets are now on sale to see the Broadway premiere of Sam Shepard’s 1982 play Fool for Love. Starring Nina Arianda, Sam Rockwell, Tom Pelphrey and Gordon Joseph Weiss, the Daniel Aukin-directed production will begin performances on September 15.Set in a seedy Mojave Desert motel, Fool for Love follows two old flames as they explore the secrets and desires of their tangled past. The production played the Williamstown Theatre Festival last year; Arianda, Rockwell and Weiss reprise their performances for the Broadway transfer.Opening night is set for October 8 at the Samuel J. Friedman Theatre.last_img

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Wet Relief.

first_imgThreatened by another year of continued drought, farmers are relishing the timely relief that recent rains provided most of Georgia’s major row crops. Overall, experts say this is the best crops have looked in three years.Weed and disease control are the main issues facing peanut farmers right now. But that’s not necessarily bad, said John Beasley, an Extension Service agronomist with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.”Anytime those two situations occur early on in the season, it’s indicative of good growing conditions (for the crop),” Beasley said.Disease, Weeds Sign of Rain Disease pressure early in the season means the crop is getting wet with rain, something farmers haven’t had in great supply over the past few years, he said.”The past week to 10 days, we’ve gotten a lot of rain,” Beasley said. “That has certainly helped growing conditions considerably.”According to the Georgia Agricultural Statistics Service, 96 percent of the peanut crop is in good to excellent condition.Not every acre has had above-normal rainfall. But a good portion of the peanut belt has gotten adequate to above-adequate rain. The eastern part of the state hasn’t had as much as the middle and southwestern parts.Most of the peanut crop was planted in mid-May. But early-season dry weather forced some farmers to plant their crop later than normal. Most of the crop, though, is growing at a good pace, he said.”Right now, we’re in better shape than we were at this time last year,” he said.The rain has helped the crop recover from the earlier dry conditions. But in a few weeks, most of the peanut crop will have reached a stage of growth that requires the highest amount of water. Then, fields will need about 2 inches of water each week.Good for Corn, Bad for Wheat Overall, the corn crop is the best farmers have seen in the past three years, particularly for dryland farmers, said Dewey Lee, a UGA Extension Service grains scientist.Georgia’s corn crop was planted late because of heavy rainfall in March. Despite the setback, the crop has grown at a steady pace, Lee said.The dryland crop was hurt by dry weather April and May, but irrigated corn is in good shape, he said. About 94 percent of the corn crop is in good to excellent condition.Because corn was planted late, the recent rain has fallen at a critical growth stage, Lee said.”This rain has come at a time when the crop is about ready to go through its reproductive stage of tasseling and silking,” Lee said.Some corn is in the early stages of kernel development, a time when the corn plant needs extra water, he said. “This has been a most timely rain.”Corn harvest will start in August.Wheat farmers aren’t as happy with the rain. Heavy rain has interrupted the last part of the harvest and has reduced the quality of the crop left in fields, Lee said.Other Georgia crops, though, have benefitted from timely rain. About 94 percent of the cotton and tobacco and 95 percent of the pecan crop are in good to excellent condition.Many farmers hope the rain their crops didn’t use will find a way to streams, ponds and groundwater to be used later in the season for irrigation, Beasley said.last_img read more

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Five win Brooks Awards

first_imgBy Faith PeppersUniversity of GeorgiaFive University of Georgia faculty members received theprestigious D.W. Brooks Awards for Excellence Oct. 18 in Athens,Ga.The $5,000 annual awards recognize UGA College of Agriculturaland Environmental Sciences educators and researchers who excel inteaching, research, extension and public service extensionprograms. An award for international agriculture is given ineven-numbered years.The 2004 winners are JeffreyDorfman, teaching; PaulBertsch, research; BillHurst, extension; DebbiePurvis, public service extension programs; and JackHouston, international agriculture.The CAES sponsors the annual lecture and awards in memory of D.W.Brooks, founder of Gold Kist, Inc., and Cotton States MutualInsurance Companies.Mark Drabenstott, vice president and director of the Center forthe Study of Rural America at the Federal Reserve Bank of KansasCity, delivered the 2004 D.W. Brooks Lecture, “The Brave NewWorld for Land-grant Universities.”Dorfman,an outstanding teacher of agricultural and applied economics, hasreceived the department’s graduate teaching award in 1991 and1992 and undergraduate teaching award in 1998, 2001 and 2003.In 2004, he was presented the Southern Agricultural EconomicsAssociation Distinguished Teaching of a Course Award for hiscourse, “The Economics of Agricultural Processing and Marketing.”This course helps prepare students to work in food industry jobs.They learn to apply economic principles to real-world situations.The course prepares them to solve economic and managementproblems they will likely face in the food industry.Bertschis a professor of soil physical chemistry and mineralogy anddirector of the Savannah River Ecology Lab. His research onaluminum chemistry has improved scientists’ understanding of theelement’s role in soil chemistry and plant and animal toxicity.His extensive work on delineating the chemical speciation, ormolecular form of atoms, of environmental contaminants and onunderstanding the connection between chemical speciation and themobility, bioavailability and toxicity of contaminants is widelyrecognized as pioneering.It has provided the basis of a new research area now generallyknown as molecular environmental science.Hurst,an extension food scientist, has been a leader in developing foodsafety training and workshop materials for the fresh andfresh-cut produce industries for more than 20 years.His work with the Georgia Department of Agriculture and otherentities is recognized nationwide. He developed the Georgia State”Fresh Produce Safety Team” and the nation’s first GAPs (GoodAgricultural Practices) short course for the fresh produceindustry.Hurst’s Georgia GAPs Food Safety Program for Georgia producegrowers, packers and shippers program saved thousands of dollarsin third-party audit fees for the industry. It is a model forother states that are working to establish similar programs.Purvis,an extension agent in Colquitt County, is involved in projectssuch as “Smart Kids Fight BAC,” a multistate food safetycurriculum, and the Faculty Research Grant Pilot Study, a profileand needs assessment of the Latino migrant population.She has trained a bilingual staff and now offers food serviceemployees a state-required food handler certification training inboth Spanish and English.She led in procuring a grant for “Voz de la Familia,” afamily-centered community outreach program, and has taughtnutrition, food safety and chronic disease prevention to nearly1,000 Latino farm workers since 2002.Houstonhas taught agricultural and applied economics at UGA since 1984.Before that, he was a Peace Corps volunteer in Malawi and thenspent nine years with the Malawi Ministry of Agriculture. Hetrained more than 2,000 agricultural extension personnel and ledin planning and developing the curriculum of a new college ofnatural resources.At UGA, Houston has been the interim director of the Africanstudies program. He developed the proposal to advance the programinto a university-wide Institute of African Studies in 2001.Houston directs his department’s first study-abroad course, theInternational Agribusiness Marketing and Management course takesat the University of Veracruz, Mexico.(Faith Peppers is a news editor with the University of GeorgiaCollege of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

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