Thin-film flows with wall slip: an asymptotic analysis of higher order glacier flow models

first_imgFree-surface thin-film flows can principally be described by two types of models. Lubrication models assume that shear stresses are dominant in the force balance of the flow and are appropriate where there is little or no slip at the base of the flow. Conversely, membrane or ‘free-film’ models are appropriate in situations where there is rapid slip and normal (or extensional) stresses play a significant role in force balance. In some physical applications, notably in glaciology, both rapid and slow slip can occur within the same fluid film. In order to capture the dynamics of rapid and slow slip in a single model that describes the entire fluid film, a hybrid of membrane and lubrication models is therefore required. Several of these hybrid models have been constructed on an ad hoc basis in glaciology, where they are usually termed ‘higher order models’. Here, we present a self-consistent asymptotic analysis of the most common of these models due originally to Blatter. We show that Blatter’s model reproduces the solution to the underlying Stokes equations to second order in the film’s aspect ratio, regardless of the amount of slip at the base of the fluid. In doing so, we also construct asymptotic expansions for the Stokes equations to this order for shear-thinning power-law fluids, paying particular attention to a high-viscosity boundary layer that develops at the free surface when there is little or no slip at the base. Lastly, we demonstrate that a depth-integrated hybrid model of comparable accuracy to Blatter’s model-which cannot be depth integrated-can also be constructed, which we suggest as a viable tool for numerical simulations of thin films that contain both slowly and rapidly sliding parts.last_img read more

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Seaspan unveils Canadian Coast Guard’s first OFSV

first_img During an open house day on October 1, Canadian shipbuilder Seaspan unveiled the first large vessel to be designed and built in Canada under the National Shipbuilding StrategyThe unveiled ship is also the Canadian Coast Guard’s first offshore fisheries science vessel (OFSV), named after Sir John Franklin, a Royal Navy officer and Arctic explorer.“Today is a historic day for the women and men of Seaspan Shipyards as we deliver on our commitments to the Canadian Coast Guard and Royal Canadian Navy,” said Brian Carter, president and CEO of Seaspan Shipyards. “In the unveiling of the first offshore fisheries science vessel, we are affirming our long-term commitment to Canada and our leading role in the growth of a West Coast centre of excellence in shipbuilding and ship repair.”In addition to the unveiling of OFSV 1, visitors also got a firsthand look at the visible progress of OFSVs 2 and 3 and received a series of guided facility demonstrations.“Seaspan Shipyards could not be where it is today without the unwavering support of our friends, neighbours and other community partners, and words cannot express how proud I am to open our doors to show them the world-class vessels we are building,” said Brian. “Today is not just a celebration; it is proof of the incredible capabilities of Canada’s shipbuilding industry.”Other ships being built under the NNS include an 86m Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) oceanographic research vessel, and two 174-meter joint support ships, the longest class of NSS-vessels currently slated for construction at Seaspan. Share this article View post tag: OFSV October 4, 2017 View post tag: NNS Seaspan unveils Canadian Coast Guard’s first offshore fisheries science vessel Authorities View post tag: Seaspan Back to overview,Home naval-today Seaspan unveils Canadian Coast Guard’s first offshore fisheries science vessel last_img read more

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Hertford students undertake Chicken Challenge

first_imgA group of intrepid third-years at Hertford College this term completed what they dubbed the ‘Chicken Challenge’, to establish whether they would be able to eat a chicken a day for a whole week.The boys were confident in their ability to complete the challenge, with Japanologist Lawson Lancaster stating, “I occasionally eat the ready cooked whole chicken from Tesco after going to the gym some days so I didn’t think it would be that difficult.”However, third-year medic Patrick Burke noted that only three of the original four participants made it to the end of the challenge, saying, “It was a shame that Jamie Beacom [an original member of the team] lost his head and chickened out. But the rest of us were – unlike our gastronomic exploits –game, and we got to the other side of the metaphorical road.”Burke fully embraced the spirit of the challenge, telling Cherwell, “When people heard of our ideas to begin with, there was a resounding cry of ‘what the cluck?’. Maybe it wasn’t the breast idea. But with no poultry effort, and with the help of our friends egging us on, the idea really took (barbecue) wings.”In order to complete the challenge, the boys consumed roast chicken in a variety of ways, incorporating curries, houmous, sandwiches, oranges and barbecue sauce.Mathematician Dave Cheek noted, “Patrick was one of the more flamboyant challengers, putting a variety of fruit up each chickens’ arse.”Despite the excess of chicken, Lancaster proclaimed his continued love of the meat. “I love chicken, we have a special romance. The chicken challenge was like going away with your partner on a holiday where you spend every waking moment with them, and you have a few arguments but once you get home you want to see them again the next day.”Indeed, he ate chicken for dinner the day after the challenge was complete.However, Burke also sounded a note of caution. Though he dubbed the challenge “memorable” and “entertaining,” he pointed out the negative effects of subsisting on whole chickens for a week: “I think the challenge was a bit of a silly thing to do really. It was quite expensive, time consuming and definitely bad for our health.“A constant smell of chicken surrounded me and I was quite ill and drained for most of the week. Cooking, preparing and eating chicken takes all day long. You don’t get very much done on a chicken day.”The challenge also offered the opportunity for philosophical reflection. In his video diary, Burke opines, “I can’t help but think about life. Isn’t life just like the chicken challenge? Some people might say, ‘Isn’t what you’re doing pointless? Why are you doing that?’ And to them I say, that may be true. But I’m going to do it anyway.”last_img read more

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CULTURAL CLEANSING By Jim Redwine

first_img Gavel Gamut By Jim Redwinewww.jamesmredwine.com)CULTURAL CLEANSINGA nation is its culture and experience, its history. That is what determines its character. The same is true of the world. We learn or do not learn from the mistakes and accomplishments of ourselves and those who have preceded us. If we learn, we can accomplish more. If we do not learn, we may repeat mistakes. To learn from the past we must know and understand it. If we hide the past, we do not change what has happened but we may live to regret that we no longer remember it.ISIS or ISIL, the Islamic State of Iraq or the Islamic State of Syria, has been culturally cleansing the ancient Middle East for several years. Its members are offended by statues, monuments and artifacts that once, before ISIS destroyed them, carried within them thousands of years of human knowledge and culture. ISIS could not bear to allow memories of ancient or even contemporary peoples who had the temerity to have different beliefs from ISIS. This is particularly puzzling with religious differences since ISIS’s belief system is based on its particular interpretation of Islam which could not have existed before Mohammad who lived from 570 A.D. to 632 A.D. Yet ISIS viciously attacks the artifacts and history of cultures thousands of years old.Of course, ISIS as all such denigrators of history, is not changing the facts of history. ISIS is merely proving their own ignorance of it. Such actions are much as children who put their hands over their eyes or duck their heads under the covers in an attempt to convince themselves that because they do not see something it never existed. Or as ISIS and some other people do, they destroy historical artifacts and try to convince themselves and others that a certain history never happened. Of greater concern is the very real possibility their actions will lead to the loss by future generations of an opportunity to learn from that history.To preserve and observe a historical artifact, a temple to Baal that was 5,000 years old or a Christian church that was 2,000 years old for example, is not to worship Baal or Jesus but is to build upon and learn from history. To destroy artifacts of a nation’s past does not change that past but it may result in the nation repeating past errors because those errors are out of sight and therefore out of mind.History teaches us that power waxes and wanes and that who is on top today may be oppressed tomorrow. The burning or banning of books, say the Bible for example, does not invalidate a book’s content. It does validate the lack of vision of those who arrogate to themselves the sole interpretation of truth or history.Each of us has the right to venerate or denigrate whatever philosophy, religion or creed we wish. However, just because what happened in history may be offensive to us does not mean we should attempt to establish such history never occurred. Haven’t we lived through enough of such culture destroying behavior to recognize the danger in such a course?Perhaps next week we can revisit such a revision of history that occurred right here in Posey County, Indiana and delve into what that revision might mean to us today.For more Gavel Gamut articles go to:www.jamesmredwine.comA nation is its culture and experience, its history. That is what determines its character. The same is true of the world. We learn or do not learn from the mistakes and accomplishments of ourselves and those who have preceded us. If we learn, we can accomplish more. If we do not learn, we may repeat mistakes. To learn from the past we must know and understand it. If we hide the past, we do not change what has happened but we may live to regret that we no longer remember it.ISIS or ISIL, the Islamic State of Iraq or the Islamic State of Syria, has been culturally cleansing the ancient Middle East for several years. Its members are offended by statues, monuments and artifacts that once, before ISIS destroyed them, carried within them thousands of years of human knowledge and culture. ISIS could not bear to allow memories of ancient or even contemporary peoples who had the temerity to have different beliefs from ISIS. This is particularly puzzling with religious differences since ISIS’s belief system is based on its particular interpretation of Islam which could not have existed before Mohammad who lived from 570 A.D. to 632 A.D. Yet ISIS viciously attacks the artifacts and history of cultures thousands of years old.Of course, ISIS as all such denigrators of history, is not changing the facts of history. ISIS is merely proving their own ignorance of it. Such actions are much as children who put their hands over their eyes or duck their heads under the covers in an attempt to convince themselves that because they do not see something it never existed. Or as ISIS and some other people do, they destroy historical artifacts and try to convince themselves and others that a certain history never happened. Of greater concern is the very real possibility their actions will lead to the loss by future generations of an opportunity to learn from that history.To preserve and observe a historical artifact, a temple to Baal that was 5,000 years old or a Christian church that was 2,000 years old for example, is not to worship Baal or Jesus but is to build upon and learn from history. To destroy artifacts of a nation’s past does not change that past but it may result in the nation repeating past errors because those errors are out of sight and therefore out of mind.History teaches us that power waxes and wanes and that who is on top today may be oppressed tomorrow. The burning or banning of books, say the Bible for example, does not invalidate a book’s content. It does validate the lack of vision of those who arrogate to themselves the sole interpretation of truth or history.Each of us has the right to venerate or denigrate whatever philosophy, religion or creed we wish. However, just because what happened in history may be offensive to us does not mean we should attempt to establish such history never occurred. Haven’t we lived through enough of such culture destroying behavior to recognize the danger in such a course?Perhaps next week we can revisit such a revision of history that occurred right here in Posey County, Indiana and delve into what that revision might mean to us today.For more Gavel Gamut articles go to:www.jamesmredwine.comFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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IT’S STILL NOT GUNS

first_imgMaking Sense by Michael ReaganDuring the intense media coverage of Wednesday’s tragic events in Parkland, Fla., I was shocked to hear it was the 18th school shooting so far this year.18. In 45 days.That sounds terrible.That sounds like a huge American crisis that needs to be addressed immediately by our great leaders in Washington.But that 18 number, which the anti-gun lobby in the media has emphasized without going into the details of the individual incidents, is highly misleading.None of those previous shootings was anything like the horrible one on Wednesday that left 17 students and teachers dead at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.The year’s worst previous shooting, which happened in Kentucky at a high school less than a month ago, left two students dead and 14 wounded by gunfire.The only other death was a single murder that occurred on a college campus.Two of the shootings that occurred at one of the country’s 120,000 public and private schools this year were suicides.Some involved guns firing accidentally. And most of the other incidents were random shootings on public school property that resulted in no one being hurt.But these details of the earlier shootings didn’t matter to religious anti-gun nuts in the media like Don Lemon of CNN and liberal politicians like Sen. Chris Murphy of Connecticut.Before we knew hardly anything about the Parkland shooting they were offering their usual simplistic solution for stopping what Murphy exaggeratedly called “this epidemic of mass slaughter” in our schools.To no one’s surprise, they called for new laws to control or outlaw guns, especially semi-automatic rifles like the AR-15.Lemon and Murphy will never give up their gun-control pipe dreams.But those of us who live in the real world know that no law will ever be devised or enforced that can stop a determined mass killer from getting his hands on a gun if he wanted one badly enough.Anyway, guns aren’t the problem. There are 300 million of all kinds floating around the country. An infinitesimal fraction are used by people to hurt other people.But there has to be something going on in our society that has caused angry, evil or mentally disturbed young men to plan and carry out these rare mass shootings at Columbine, Sandy Hook and Parkland.Is it because of social media? Violent video games? Bullying in schools? Broken families? Anti-depressant drugs? Boredom? All of the above? Something else?Whatever the cause, we need to sit down as a country and figure out how we can identify, help or stop crazy or violent individuals before they carry out their deadly attacks.Meanwhile, forget the gun-control politics. If we really want to protect our kids in schools we have to get serious.We need to put guards in our schools – armed guards, not spectators.We need make sure any potential mass killer, young or old, knows that our schools are no longer “gun free” zones.Better yet, as Judge Andrew Napolitano of Fox News suggests, we need to copy the Israelis.For years they’ve successfully protected their schoolchildren’s lives from attack with strong fences, locked gates, careful ID checks and cameras.But they’ve also done the smartest thing – arming and training classroom teachers who can defend against intruders. And no one knows which teacher is packing a gun.Increasing security at our nearly 100,000 public schools to prevent future Parklands will cost us a lot of money.Local districts and the states should pay most of the tab. But how about this idea:Instead of the federal government raising my gas tax 12 cents a gallon and pretending it’s going to be used to fix our highways, why not use the money to hire guards for our schools – and give them guns they know how to use.FOOTNOTE: THIS ARTICLE WAS POSTED BY THE CITY COUNTY OBSERVER WITHOUT ANY OPINION, BIAS OR EDITING.We hope that article will provoke honest and open dialogue concerning issues that we, as responsible citizens of this community, need to address in a rational and responsible way?”FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Evron’s evolution

first_imgLong before Peter Kay uttered the immortal line in Phoenix Nights, “Garlic bread – it’s the future, I’ve tasted it!” a Northern Irish bakery was having the very same flashbulb epiphany.Portadown’s Evron Foods, which was established back in 1983 to supply raw frozen dough, has swept up over 90% of the Northern Irish garlic breads market since it became an early adopter of the now-familiar product in 1987. Since then, it has diversified its speciality breads, supplying some major customers – not least, the high street sandwich giant Subway.But Northern Ireland is only one part of the success story, accounting for just 7% of Evron’s business in the year to August 2006. Instead, the bulk of products was supplied to Great Britain and represented some 65% of the firm’s £15 million turnover. In August last year, it opened up a new production plant in South Wales to boost capacity and bring it closer to market.The business now has three strands: packaged products for retail, whether branded Easibake or own-label; par-baked and frozen dough products for in-store bakeries; and foodservice, which includes Subway, restaurants and wholesalers. The biggest increase in the UK has been in its chilled business and there are imminent plans to produce added-value breads in the new Pontypool facility. “As a temperature-controlled supplier, we give the product life by either chilling or freezing it; with the ability to produce a fair volume and distribute safely, we’re a growing business,” explains MD Morris Evans.value-added focusEvron dropped its pastry production in 1988 and is now focused solely on value-added breads with toppings and fillings. “There were a number of very large companies specialising in frozen pastries, and we found that we couldn’t offer an advantage, so we concentrated on the areas where we could,” says Morris.The time is now ripe for bake-off speciality breads market to take a step forwards, he believes. “We are developing specially-shaped breads with different fillings and toppings,” says Morris. “Value-added breads in the market are mostly based around garlic and we’ve got to move forwards now. The variety of toppings can be added to, such as chargrilled vegetables, as well as injecting flavours other than butter and garlic.”Subway has been looking at increasing its bread offering, and Evron has been developing ways to extend the subs retailer’s offer with, among other things, a breakfast choice and a carrier for later in the evenings. Some urban Subway locations trade well into the early hours, and the range needs to reflect this, says marketing director Dominic Downey. “Subway has tasked us, along with the German manufacturer of Subway breads, to come up with ideas that will complement their sandwiches,” he says.Evron exclusively supplies a white and a brown bread frozen into Subway’s UK and Irish outlets, which are then topped in-store and baked-off to give a range of five breads – wheat, honey and oat, hearty Italian, Italian, and cheese and herbs. So how did Evron secure the three-year Subway rolling contract? “We were basically in the right place at the right time,” says Downey. Evron was approached in 1991 and subsequently developed the bread products according to specifications issued from the States. Originally supplying just a single store in Dublin, Subway’s UK and Irish operations have since snowballed and the firm now has 780 stores, with a projected target of 2,010 shops by 2010.inspired by US successInitially, Subway’s European arm was born out of master franchisees inspired by the concept’s success in the US, who then imported it back home. Bread, meats, cheese and other ingredient suppliers needed to be sourced and Evron was among the original group. Following strong growth, Subway HQ has since introduced its own regional director to oversee European strategy.”It has taken a lot of hard work to first establish and then develop the brand, but Subway is a great concept and everyone involved is passionate about it,” says Downey. “In the last three to four years we have seen momentum really pick up. We’ve kept pace and grown as their business has grown – they’re a significant and valued customer.”All breads destined for Subway are shipped from Northern Ireland. As the US sandwich giant stampedes towards its growth targets, there is significant spare capacity in the new Pontypool plant to step up production. “A lot of our developments, both here and in Northern Ireland, clearly have Subway in mind and we provide a balance of capacity for their use,” says Evans.Financial support from the Welsh Development Agency and National Assembly for Wales played some role in its decision to set down roots in Wales, as well as quick access to the M4 and an easy route to Birmingham, London and the south. “One of the reasons we needed a GB-based manufacturing site was because we needed to be closer to the market,” says Downey. “From a commercial point of view, that stretch of water between Ireland and the UK mainland adds both cost and time.”EQUIPMENT INVESTMENTWith two Mecatherm French bread lines already installed, the facility has space to house double the amount of equipment and that capacity could be doubled again by extending the facility. “We are about a quarter of where we want to be with machinery on the Pontypool site. We will look at more development this year,” says Morris.Evron is taking speciality breads into the in-store bakery and has developed frozen bread dough products for Asda, including tear-and-share. Proved and baked-off in-store, they allow retailers to extend their range without having to make from scratch. They are then sold on the ambient shelves.”We have developed some tear-and-share breads that we sell into one of the key supermarkets, which are supplied frozen and baked-off and sold on the ambient shelves. That adds a couple of days’ shelf life,” says Downey. “We’re giving retailers a ready-made product, and there is a growing demand for that in the in-store bakery. We’re ready to extend that further.”RETAIL DEVELOPMENTDowney anticipates that its retail business in the UK will increase. “Apart from Asda, we also deal with Netto, Musgrave Budgens Londis and Waitrose. But we don’t deal with all the big retailers at present. It’s our plan to be a supplier to as many of the key players as we can, not forgetting our existing customer base which has helped us get where we are. We have had some customers for 20 years and haven’t lost sight of where we came from.”Flavour trends are favouring Mediterranean and Mexican-inspired bakery products, with jalapeños, chillies and sun-dried tomatoes increasingly used, he says. “Supermarkets are looking for that indulgent product that consumers might buy at the weekend. When developing breads, we look at the whole meal occasion and ask ourselves how would the product fit into that meal experience?”Like many other bakery manufacturers, health is a big consideration for Evron; it has reduced salt, fat and taken out hydrogenated and trans fats from its traditional garlic bread range. Functional breads, such as a low-GI bread, are also being considered. “We have the opportunity to develop significantly with our new site,” says Downey. “We’re hungry to develop business and we have a history of putting investment and resources in place in anticipation of our future business needs. There is still a long way for us to go. We don’t expect our competitors to roll over and let us take business off them, but we’re here to stay. n—-=== Evron Foods at a glance ===History: Started out supplying par-baked breads, frozen doughs and pastries to in-store bakeries in Northern Ireland. It progressed onto specialising in garlic bread and dropped the pastry side of the business.Founded: 1983Locations: 120,000sq ft in Portadown, Northern Ireland; 40,000sq ft in Pontypool, South WalesOwnership: private, run by MD Morris EvansProducts: Par-baked breads, raw frozen breads, value-added breads with toppings and fillingsMajor customers: Subway, Asda, WaitroseSupply split: Around 40% foodservice, 60% retailersBrand: EasibakeStaff: over 150 in Portadown, supplemented seasonally, and 40 in Pontypoollast_img read more

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State-of-the-art wind tunnel advances hypersonic flight research

first_imgCourtesy of Andrew Bustard The Notre Dame Hypersonic Aerodynamics Lab unveiled a quiet Mach 6 hypersonic tunnel in 2018. Since then, the department has continued to pursue innovation in flight technology.Thomas Juliano, assistant professor of aerospace and mechanical engineering, established the lab and began the project in August 2014. Juliano said his motivation behind the project is the possibility of hypersonic flight in the future. “The story of transportation for the last 2,000 years has been finding ways to go faster and faster,” Juliano said. “This is merely the latest step in that.”Juliano previously worked with a smaller-scale quiet wind tunnel as a graduate student at Purdue University before coming to Notre Dame. “We can do a lot with that, but we want to be able to test longer models in order to see more of what’s going on,” Juliano said. “The logical next step for facility development in order to unlock these other investigations in fluid mechanics was to build a larger-scale item.”Challenges for hypersonic flight include extremely high temperatures that surround aircraft when going thousands of miles per hour, said first-year doctoral student Andrew Bustard. “The high-heating rates, if not designed around, will destroy your vehicle,” Bustard said. “Obviously, we don’t want that. But the flow physics is so complex that we don’t actually understand fully what’s causing the heating or the best way to reduce it, so the whole point of this group is to study the flow around objects around potential or get a better understanding of the flow around high-speed objects.”The Mach 6 quiet wind tunnel is unique as it better replicates the silent noise that occurs in the atmosphere, Bustard said. “Most facilities we have on the ground have way more noise than in the atmosphere,” Bustard said. “If we truly want to model the heating in the atmosphere, we need to have flow in our wind tunnel that represents those atmospheric conditions. [The quiet tunnel] better matches the atmosphere, and that’s why it’s very useful for us.”The Mach 6 tunnel project has provided opportunities for multiple engineering students to get involved in hypersonic research. Erik Hoberg, a third-year doctoral student, specializes in flow characterization and wind tunnel design. He has been involved in the project for a little over a year. ”I was not part of [Juliano’s] group when I came to Notre Dame,” Hoberg said. “Then I met him and saw what his group was doing and really wanted to be on that project.”Fifth-year doctoral candidate Carson Running has helped with the quiet tunnel since his first year of graduate school. He worked heavily on the design and building of the tunnel in the early years of the project. “One question that I researched was the best way to heat the large surface area [of the wind tunnel],” Running said. “We actually found a company down in Texas that sells these big long heating blankets that can just be wrapped around the steel portions of the wind tunnel and set to a certain temperature that we desire.”Running spoke to the challenges of designing a state-of-the-art quiet tunnel that can advance the progress of hypersonic flight.  “A lot of the problems we’re trying to solve from small to big haven’t really been solved before, so overcoming that was … doing a lot of research but also a ton of collaboration and meetings with professor Juliano, using his expertise and kind of working together,” Running said. “One thing that I always like that [Juliano] says when he assigns projects or assignments to us is, ‘I wouldn’t be assigning them to you if I knew how to do them.’ He really does need our help and is willing to work with us and bounce ideas off of each other.”Tags: aerospace engineering, Wind tunnel Faculty and students at the Notre Dame Hypersonic Aerodynamics Lab unveiled the largest quiet Mach 6 hypersonic wind tunnel in the United States on Nov. 30, 2018. Nearly a year later, the lab continues to apply the technology to the future of flying.last_img read more

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Trauma Tuesday: Parkour Fails

first_imgFirst, a taste of what parkour (executed properly) should look like. Then, what happens the 9 times out of 10 that you try to jump from your buddy’s balcony to the stair railing outside: a big, fat, sometimes funny, mostly painful, FAIL.last_img

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Sand City’s Tasting Room Reopens in Northport

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York After an outpouring of support from fans near and far, Sand City Brewing got approval from the Village of Northport to reopen its tasting room on Main Street and welcomed beer lovers back on Sunday. After closing four months ago for renovations to its walkway, Sand City’s permits were temporarily revoked by the village zoning board after complaints about excessive crowds and noise, some related to the long lines that form for new can releases of the brewery’s popular beers. At a public zoning board meeting on March 28, dozens of Sand City supporters came out to express their positive view of the brewery and its impact on the village. According to co-owners Bill Kiernan and Kevin Sihler, Sand City also received “overwhelming support from people online through post and petitions, and in letter writing to our local officials.”  The tasting room will resume regularly scheduled hours today, open from noon to 8 pm. As the Press reported in February, Sand City first opened its tasting room in fall 2015 and quickly established achieved cult status for brewing some of Long Island’s best IPAs (India Pale Ale, a hoppy brew).In the past year, the brewery’s fame has spread across the country through a series of collaboration beers with well-known craft breweries from California to Virginia to across Brooklyn, Queens and Long Island.      Sand City Brewing is located at 60 Main Street in Northport.  They can be reached at 631-651-2767 or at sandcitybeer.com.Bernie Kilkelly is the editor and publisher of LIBeerGuide.com.last_img read more

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Keep cybercriminals off your members’ naughty lists this holiday season

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr This post is currently collecting data… Black Friday and Holiday deals have begun, and with the COVID-19 pandemic, a much larger portion of this year’s purchasing activity will take place online. Cybercriminals are going to take to the internet to capitalize on this increase in online shopping. Online consumer scams, ACH fraud, card-not-present fraud, new account and loan fraud, and payment app fraud (i.e. Venmo, Zelle, and PayPal Direct) are among the fraud attacks that will be on the rise during this year’s holiday season.It is important for your credit union to be vigilant and proactive in preventing these attacks, while also educating your employees and members on how to do the same.Holiday Scam Prevention Tips for Credit Unions:Require multiple authentication layers to validate the identity of current and new accountholders.center_img This is placeholder text continue reading »last_img read more

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