Seasonality of polypide recycling and sexual reproduction in some erect Antarctic bryozoans

first_imgThe seasonality of polypide cycling has been investigated for three species of erect bryozoans from Antarctica: Isoseculiflustra rubefacta (Kluge, 1914), Nematoflustra flagellata (Waters, 1904) and Himantozoum antarcticum (Calvet, 1905). Approximately ten colonies of each species were collected monthly by SCUBA divers over a 14 mo period during 1992/1993, and the status of each individual zooid was classified as differentiating/regenerating, active (feeding autozooids), degenerate (brown body) or sexually reproductive (ovicells present, or zooid containing a larva). Polypide cycling in all three species was distinctly seasonal. New zooids formed at the growth margin and typically contained actively feeding polypides for ≃9 mo before these polypides degenerated into brown bodies in the austral winter (June). Very few polypides were active in the period from June to August, when water-column food levels were at their lowest; after this period new polypides differentiated. Individual zooids typically underwent a total of five (I. rubefacta and N. flagellata), or at least four (H. antarcticum) complete polypide cycles before becoming senescent. Polypide lifetimes generally became shorter as the age of the zooid increased. Sexual reproduction was also distinctly seasonal in these species, with bands of ovicells or sexually reproductive zooids being formed each year in late summer once a given colony had grown to a threshold size (or age). Larvae were then brooded for ≃10 mo before being released in January/February (N. flagellata) or February/March (H. antarcticum). The seasonal patterns of polypide cycling are related clearly to the variations in food availability, and these species appear to have the longest zooid lifetime (≃5 yr) and the slowest polypide cycling (once per year with polypide lifetimes up to 10 mo) reported for any bryozoan so farlast_img read more

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Underway seawater and atmospheric measurements of volatile organic compounds in the Southern Ocean

first_imgDimethyl sulfide and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are important for atmospheric chemistry. The emissions of biogenically derived organic gases, including dimethyl sulfide and especially isoprene, are not well constrained in the Southern Ocean. Due to a paucity of measurements, the role of the ocean in the atmospheric budgets of atmospheric methanol, acetone, and acetaldehyde is even more poorly known. In order to quantify the air–sea fluxes of these gases, we measured their seawater concentrations and air mixing ratios in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean, along a ∼ 11 000 km long transect at approximately 60∘ S in February–April 2019. Concentrations, oceanic saturations, and estimated fluxes of five simultaneously sampled gases (dimethyl sulfide, isoprene, methanol, acetone, and acetaldehyde) are presented here. Campaign mean (±1σ) surface water concentrations of dimethyl sulfide, isoprene, methanol, acetone, and acetaldehyde were 2.60 (±3.94), 0.0133 (±0.0063), 67 (±35), 5.5 (±2.5), and 2.6 (±2.7) nmol dm−3 respectively. In this dataset, seawater isoprene and methanol concentrations correlated positively. Furthermore, seawater acetone, methanol, and isoprene concentrations were found to correlate negatively with the fugacity of carbon dioxide, possibly due to a common biological origin. Campaign mean (±1σ) air mixing ratios of dimethyl sulfide, isoprene, methanol, acetone, and acetaldehyde were 0.17 (±0.09), 0.053 (±0.034), 0.17 (±0.08), 0.081 (±0.031), and 0.049 (±0.040) ppbv. We observed diel changes in averaged acetaldehyde concentrations in seawater and ambient air (and to a lesser degree also for acetone and isoprene), which suggest light-driven production. Campaign mean (±1σ) fluxes of 4.3 (±7.4) µmol m−2 d−1 DMS and 0.028 (±0.021) µmol m−2 d−1 isoprene are determined where a positive flux indicates from the ocean to the atmosphere. Methanol was largely undersaturated in the surface ocean with a mean (±1σ) net flux of −2.4 (±4.7) µmol m−2 d−1, but it also had a few occasional episodes of outgassing. This section of the Southern Ocean was found to be a source and a sink for acetone and acetaldehyde this time of the year, depending on location, resulting in a mean net flux of −0.55 (±1.14) µmol m−2 d−1 for acetone and −0.28 (±1.22) µmol m−2 d−1 for acetaldehyde. The data collected here will be important for constraining the air–sea exchange, cycling, and atmospheric impact of these gases, especially over the Southern Ocean.last_img read more

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Calls for rent controls spread to Manchester

first_imgManchester is the latest city to call for government to give it the authority to introduce rent controls via new ‘pressure zones’ within which rent rises would be restricted.These measures are similar to the rent controls already being enforced within many urban areas of Scotland, and come just three months after London mayor Sadiq Khan made a similar move.The Greater Manchester Combined Authority says it needs the rent controls after a report into the city’s private residential market that it commissioned also called for some forms of rent control to be introduced.But the proposals have been heavily criticised by the Residential Landlords Association, which has its headquarters within the city.“Rent controls are on the face of it an attractive but simplistic and populist approach to the increased cost of housing,” says its Policy Manager, John Stewart (left).“In reality they make the situation for tenants worse. All the evidence from around the world where they have been introduced shows that they reduce supply and drive up the cost of housing.“Having controls on rent is not much help to a person who cannot find somewhere to live because of the cut in the number of properties available.“Instead, the Mayor of Greater Manchester needs to work with the private rented sector on how to boost the supply of homes for rent to meet ever growing demand.” October 7, 2019Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Home » News » Calls for rent controls spread to Manchester previous nextRegulation & LawCalls for rent controls spread to ManchesterCity authority calls for powers to bring in ‘pressure zones’ where rents could be severely restricted similar to those requested by the Mayor of London.Nigel Lewis7th October 20190735 Viewslast_img read more

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Brakes aims for top slot in bakery foodservice

first_imgWholesale giant Brakes has set its sights on becoming the num-ber one UK bakery foodservice wholesaler, following the launch of its new bakery division next week, which will target the coffee shop and catering sectors.The division, named La Boulangerie, includes Brakes’ existing bakery products alongside newly sourced products, swelling its number of bakery stock-keeping units (skus) from 190 to over 260, with further quarterly launches planned.Premium products within the range will be branded La Boulangerie and include bread, organic products, rolls, Viennoiserie, patisserie, muffins and traybakes, and encompass a number of industry firsts, such as ’rosemary treebark’ sand- wich bread.Half of the products have been sourced from the UK, including Oxfordshire-based artisan bread bakery Brown Sugar, with the rest supplied from France, Sweden and Belgium.Heading up the launch, Brakes’ bakery specialist Simon Cannell exclusively revealed to British Baker that it planned to improve top-end choice within the market and become a major player in foodservice bakery – a category valued by Brakes at £266m.”Within that market, there’s one key supplier and they pretty much own the market, alongside a few smaller businesses which are restricted in what they can do,” said Cannell.”Our speciality group portfolio has already got a butcher’s, greengrocer’s and fishmonger’s, and the one that stood out as missing was a traditional bakery business. We wanted to change the perception that Brakes was associated with commo- dity bread.”Country Choice, a bakery business within the Brakes group, will continue to focus on retail food-to-go, he added. “Because we have the Brakes Group behind us, it means we can truly specialise and just focus on bread, Viennoiserie and traditional bakery, as we have savoury pastries within the rest of the business.”last_img read more

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Elkhart County schools are shoring up commencement plans

first_img Facebook CoronavirusIndianaLocalNews WhatsApp Facebook Pinterest Google+ Pinterest Twitter Previous articleIndiana first responders, families to receive nearly $1M distribution of naloxoneNext articleIndiana tops 28,000 COVID-19 cases Carl Stutsman Elkhart County schools are shoring up commencement plans Twitter Google+ WhatsApp By Carl Stutsman – May 18, 2020 0 416 Below is a list of resources you can use to find out what our districts plans are for graduation ceremonies:Baugo Community Schools- Baugo has moved their commencement outdoors to their football field. Commencement will happen July 11thConcord Community Schools- Concord has officially scheduled a virtual graduation ceremony for seniors. They had planned to hold commencement at Notre Dame but the university has canceled all in person events through July.More details hereElkhart Community Schools- Elkhart Schools will have in-person commencements. However they will only recognize students in groups of 40 at a time and no more than 250 people are allowed to be in attendance.Elkhart Memorial will begin their commencement on June 14th in the Auditorium. Elkhart Central will host graduation at Rice Field June 20th.More details hereGoshen Community Schools- Goshen has decided to divide its graduating class into six groups based solely on alphabetical order. There are also restrictions involving guests and how they must enter. It has been scheduled for June 28thMore details herelast_img read more

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G. Love & Special Sauce Joins Phil Lesh, Blues Traveler, & More On NorCal Cannabis Cup Lineup

first_imgNorCal Cannabis Cup serves as High Times’  long-running regional marijuana industry trade show. Earlier in the month, the festival—slated for June 2nd and 3rd at Sonoma County Fairgrounds in Santa Rosa, CA—announced its initial musical lineup, which includes performances by Phil Lesh & Friends, Blues Traveler, and Arrested Development. Today, NorCal Cannabis Cup has added even more musical mayhem to the weekend with the announcement that G. Love & Special Sauce will also be joining the event’s two-day musical lineup.NorCal Cannabis Cup notes that it has a number of exciting announcements coming up this week, so keep your eyes peeled for who else is expected to join this solid lineup of festival heavy-hitters. However, the musical lineup is not the only thing draws attendees to Santa Rosa. Rather, as High Times notes,In addition to the incredible musical lineup, there will be tons of other entertainment—live art murals, a Ferris wheel, amazing food pop-ups and much more. … Vendors will be selling the hottest, most innovative products, visual artists from Black Light. Visuals will be doing trippy body painting, and, of course, tons of freebies and swag will be raining from the stage.You can grab your single-day and two-day tickets to see Phil Lesh & Friends, Blues Traveler, Arrested Development, and G. Love at the NorCal Cannabis Cup here.Enter To Win A Pair Of Tickets!<span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span>last_img read more

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Chronic stress takes a toll on the young

first_img Read Full Story For very young children, growing up in a chronically stressful situation can lead to difficulties in school and poor health later in life, new research suggests. To offset these by-products of “toxic stress” in the most at-risk children, Jack Shonkoff of Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) says it’s important to help build the capabilities of parents and caregivers, the most important influences in these children’s lives.In an interview on WGBH’s “Innovation Hub” on January 31, 2014, Shonkoff, director of Harvard’s Center on the Developing Child and the Julius B. Richmond FAMRI Professor of Child Health and Development at HSPH, discussed the “wear-and-tear” effect of chronic stress on the body—how it can accelerate aging, lead to disease, and disrupt brain development. In young children, much of the delicate brain circuitry develops between ages 3 and 5, so “not doing anything before age 4 for children at greatest risk [from chronic stress] is a huge mistake that we pay a tremendous price for later,” said Shonkoff. Helping boost positive, predictable interactions between children and their caregivers is key, he said.last_img read more

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This is a chance to celebrate’

first_imgThe Robinson Community Learning Center (RCLC) celebrated its 10th Anniversary Friday. The Center was established under the tenure of University President Fr. Emeritus Edward “Monk” Malloy. “This is a chance to celebrate and recognize that great things happen when good people pull together their knowledge and resources to help the young, old and everyone in between,” Malloy said at a celebration Friday. The accomplishments and collaborations of the Center were on full display Friday night at an open house held for the community. “It is always important to set ambitious goals, but also important to celebrate our successes,” University President Fr. John Jenkins said. Some of the programs based at the RCLC are a Lego Robotics team, an entrepreneurship program and a youth Shakespeare troupe. Charell Lucky, a student that participates in the youth Shakespeare troupe, performed Sonnet 40 and a scene from Henry VI. “The RCLC is a blessing for me and my family,” Lucky said. Take Ten, a violence prevention program in local public schools also celebrated. The RCLC is home to the program, which serves 16 schools in the South Bend Mishawaka community, as well as the Center for the Homeless, all Boys and Girls clubs and community centers. John Hess, a local principal, received the James A. Kapsa award for his work with Take Ten. “Take Ten works best when the principal steps up and is strong and instrumental to making Take Ten a success,” Ellen Kyes, director of the Take Ten program, said while presenting the award. Two members of the RCLC received an award for their participation. Isaiah Crudup won the James A. Roemer award presented to a youth participant that has excelled in the Center’s programs and Alfreda Redding won the Dr. Dale O. Grayson award honoring an adult in the RCLC education programs. The Renelda Robinson award, named after the community member whose name also sits over the RCLC, is given to a community volunteer that promotes learning and relationship building. Bridgett Mitchell received the award and was described as a volunteer who not only does the job, but does it with kindness. Two members of the Notre Dame community were also honored. Junior Caitlin Kinser received the Rev. Don McNeill C.S.C. award, which is presented to a Notre Dame student volunteer, for her dedication to the Shakespeare program at the center. The Arthur Quigly award is given to a distinguished Notre Dame faculty or staff member. This year’s recipient was Nicole MacLaughlin, a University Writing Progam teacher who partnered youth participants in the Shakespeare troupe and her students. She also received a grant that allowed her to take 25 Notre Dame and 16 RCLC students to Chicago to see Romeo and Juliet. “[The RCLC is the] heart and home of the east side,” Jasmine Brown, RCLC advisory board co-chair, said. “We need to be the visionaries of the future and the philanthropists of tomorrow.” Jay Caponigro, the current Notre Dame director of community engagement and first director of the RCLC, said he is confident the RCLC will continue on strong due to the great people and community that make the center what it is.last_img read more

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Lessons in leadership: Kristy Hesse

first_img continue reading » Kristy Hesse is the chief human resources officer of Community First Credit Union($3.6B, Appleton, WI), a position she has held since March 2019. Here, she answers Callahan’s leadership questions about her credit union’s response to the coronavirus pandemic. Between the beginning of 2020 and now, how have your operations changed?Kristy Hesse: Wisconsin had a Safer at Home order, not a complete Stay at Home. We moved to remote work, and branch lobbies were open by appointment only. We leveraged DocuSign and other virtual capabilities. We’re all getting to be experts on Zoom, Teams, and WebEx.I oversee human resources and training, and although we briefly paused some training and development, we didn’t stop recruiting at all. We held remote interviews, and when we conducted new employee orientation, we did as much of the onboarding virtually as we could. What we couldn’t do virtually we moved to an empty office where we could control the number of people in the room, adhere to social distancing rules, and take frequent breaks to sanitize hands and surfaces.We decided it was more important to plan for the future by hiring talent than it was to control for operating expenses. It was a leap of faith, but we made the leap. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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DA: Kostick pleads guilty to manslaughter

first_imgKostick is scheduled to be sentenced on April 16. The district attorney’s office says Kostick will be sentenced to 10 years in prison, which will begin immediately after his current prison sentence for burglary. According to his plea, Kostick intended to cause “serious physical injury” to his father, Harry J. Kostick, but it resulted in the father’s death. Kostick will serve a parole term for both the burglary and manslaughter charges. BINGHAMTON (WBNG) — A man pleaded guilty for the death of his father in Broome County Court Tuesday morning.center_img The event occurred from Sept. 1 to Oct. 3 2014 at his father’s residence on Lincoln Avenue in Endicott. The Broome County District Attorney’s Office says 34-year-old Shawn M. Kostick pleaded guilty to first-degree manslaughter, a class B felony.last_img read more

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