Watch Jimmy Fallon Channel The Boss & Sing “Robert Mueller’s Comin’ To Town”

first_imgObviously, most Americans are carefully watching the ongoing Special Counsel investigation led by Robert Mueller on Russian interference in the 2016 presidential elections. Thus far, a number of persons—George Papadopoulos, Rick Gates, Paul Manafort, and, most recently, former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn—have been indicted through the investigation, with more indictments anticipated to fall in the coming weeks.This Twitter Takedown Of Donald Trump, Set To The Lyrics Of “Atlantic City”, Is F****ing HilariousRecently, TV personality and late show host Jimmy Fallon offered up his own stance on the recent flurry of indictments, taking on the persona of American musical hero Bruce Springsteen during a bit on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon. As Fallon impersonated the Boss, he sang a parody of the classic Christmas tune “Santa Claus is Comin’ to Town”, instead appropriately changing the tune into “Robert Mueller’s Coming To Town”.Watch Donald Trump Frown Through This French Marching Band’s Tribute To Daft PunkWith lines like “You better not run, you better not cry, you better not lie to the FBI”—a reference to Michael Flynn and George Papadopoulos’ charges of false statements under oath—Fallon warns of the ramifications of perjury. Check out the video for yourself below, and from Live For Live Music to our readership, Happy Holidays.last_img read more

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GameStop’s stupefying stock rise doesn’t hide its reality

first_imgNEW YORK (AP) — Behind GameStop’s stock surge is the grim reality that the video game retailer is floundering even as the industry around it is booming. The Texas-based company has been swept up in a battle between big-moneyed hedge funds betting against it and small investors trying to prop it up. That has caused GameStop’s share price to soar despite the shaky financials underneath. And even though there are some bright spots, like improving holiday sales and the naming of co-founder Chewy to the board, any reinvention will take take time and may not work. Many investors fully understand the contradiction between GameStop’s stock price and its business fundamentals. But for those who imagine it to be the next Tesla or Amazon, the truth is: It’s likely not.last_img

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Dead wood

first_imgBy Stephanie SchupskaUniversity of GeorgiaDead trees lining the roads after Christmas are usually the last lonely reminders of the holiday season. This year, don’t ditch that tree. Reuse it, says a University of Georgia expert Christmas tree saver. “When Christmastime is over, Christmas tree buyers everywhere are reminded that wrapping paper can be forced into a trash can, but a tree can’t,” says Matthew Chappell, a horticulturist with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.Some people use their dried up tree to make a bonfire, but if done improperly this can be a huge fire hazard. Others chunk trees over the back fence (into the woods, not their neighbor’s yard). Chappell gets a little more creative.Chappell’s “Top 10 Things to do With a Christmas Tree After Christmas” are:No. 1 – Whittle a walking stick. Christmas trees are generally tree species unique in Georgia. Make a special walking stick. “It takes a lot of whittling. You can give it as a gift next Christmas.” This is Chappell’s favorite use.No. 2 – Create a coat rack. Cut all the branches off except for a few at the top, which should be trimmed 3 inches to 4 inches from the trunk. “It will turn out very good if you strip the bark. The wood is very pretty.”No. 3 – Build a bottle tree. Cut all the branches about a foot from the trunk and put wine bottles on them. “My friend in Charleston, S.C., started that trend in his yard at Folly Beach. It’s definitely better with different colored bottles.”No. 4 – Fashion a fish habitat. Drop three or four trees together in a pond or lake. Small fish will use the trees as a protective habitat to hide from larger fish.No. 5 – Craft a longbow. “My brother-in-law made a longbow out of last year’s Christmas tree. A lot of bow hunters are going back to the old style, the old world way of hunting.”No. 6 – Carve a bird pole. “My parents have used trees as birdhouse poles.” They can also be used to hold bird feeders, but make sure to cut the branches to the trunk or the birdseed will become a squirrel feast.No. 7 – Shape a vine pole. Trim the branches off, but leave some for vine support. Sink the trunk in the ground. Plant a climbing plant like a morning glory or clematis next to it.No. 8 – Make some mulch. “Some people, if they have a chipper or shredder, make mulch out of their trees.”No. 9 – Split wood. Chop up the tree. The smaller branches make excellent kindling.No. 10 – Plant a landscape addition. “If you get a live tree, just plant it.” If you plan to plant your Christmas tree, pick a variety that can take Georgia’s heat. Pines, cedars and cypresses typically do well in Georgia. Spruce and fir will wither when summer hits.(Stephanie Schupska is a news editor with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

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La Nina Weather Pattern

first_imgA La Nina weather pattern is providing warmer winter temperatures for Georgia residents, sparking farmers’ concerns about potential plant diseases at the start of production season in early spring.University of Georgia Cooperative Extension plant pathologist Bob Kemerait said that farmers rely on extreme cold and freezing temperatures during the winter for a break from one growing season to the next. Right now, that isn’t happening.The warmer temperatures allowed “volunteer” peanuts or “volunteer” cotton plants to regrow, increasing nematode populations and creating a haven for diseases.Nematodes are microscopic roundworms that can have a devastating effect on cotton and other row crops. Root-knot nematodes cause the most problems because they appear in a wide range of row crops. Cotton roots infected with root-knot nematodes swell in response to the infection. These knots serve as feeding sites where the nematodes grow, produce more eggs and stunt the plant’s growth.Kemerait is especially concerned that unusually warm temperatures early in the peanut season will spark outbreaks of white mold. White mold is a disease that threatens peanut production every year because it can attack plants along the soil line and near the soil surface. The limbs, crown and pegs of peanut plants and pods are often completely destroyed as a result.“When you have a winter like we just had where we had a very brief cold snap … it killed back some of the volunteer plants that might have the disease, but it’s been so short that the soil temperatures are warming back up,” Kemerait said. “Nematodes can become more active on plant species, but we could also have regrowth of peanut volunteers. This is something that farmers need to be aware of when they’re developing their disease and nematode management programs for 2017.”A warmer winter also led to a delay in the first frost experienced in south Georgia this season. It sometimes happens as early as November, but the first winter frost did not occur this season until January. According to Kemerait, this allowed more time for nematodes to build up and for pathogens to develop. If this trend continues, Kemerait worries farmers will have greater problems with diseases in the coming season.“Now, the ideal situation for disease and nematode management on the crops would be to have a very cold February. That would send the nematodes back into a hibernation phase. The pathogens would not survive on different crops or weeds,” he said.About 75 percent of south Georgia fields devoted to cotton have some level of parasitic nematodes, according to Kemerait. “If these nematodes remain on plants that stay alive and remain in the ground because of warmer temperatures, that could really spell trouble for our growers once planting begins,” he said.UGA Agricultural Climatologist Pam Knox said that weak La Nina conditions still remain in the eastern Pacific, leaving Georgia feeling warmer and drier. Since the system has decreased in intensity, Knox believes weather conditions should return to normal within two months. She cautions farmers about the possibility of a late frost.“One thing we do know from this kind of weather pattern is that the chance of a late frost goes up since the atmosphere often swings more wildly than usual between cold and warm episodes,” Knox said. “So don’t get too anxious to start planting if we have a warm spell because a cold wave could be just down the pike.”last_img read more

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Ratcliffe Scholars

first_imgFour University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) students will expand their education beyond the university’s Athens campus thanks to the legacy of one pioneering agricultural scientist, Thomas Jackson “Jack” Ratcliffe Jr.In its inaugural year, the college’s Ratcliffe Scholars Program will give four CAES students $5,000 each to participate in immersive, hands-on educational experiences outside the bounds of a traditional classroom.The students can use the funds for internships, study abroad programs, research opportunities and other worthy experiential learning activities.The Ratcliffe family established the new scholarship in honor of their father and early 20th-century CAES graduate, Thomas Jackson Ratcliffe Jr.Ratcliffe, who was born in 1916, served as a UGA Cooperative Extension agent in Lanier County, Georgia, following his graduation from UGA. He moved to Tifton, Georgia, in 1945 with his wife, Mary Frances Moore. There, he went to work for the Georgia Department of Entomology, which has since merged with the Georgia Department of Agriculture.Through annual funding, the Ratcliffe Scholars Program will grant exceptional CAES students the ability to gain experiential learning in their fields that will impact their future careers.This year’s Ratcliffe Scholars are Grant Dawson, Lindsey Fenster, Savannah Finley and Jacqueline Kessler.Dawson is a third-year student who’s majoring in biological science with an emphasis in avian biology. On campus, he participates in the CAES students’ Mentoring Among Peers Program and the UGA Pre-Dental Society. He also took part in the CAES Spring Break Georgia Agriculture Tour and learned about farms and other agriculture-related businesses across the state.Dawson intends to use this scholarship funding to study the gardens of Europe this summer. He will use any funds left after the trip as a resource for his research with Assistant Professor Woo Kim in the poultry science department, studying the differentiation of chicken stem cells.Fenster is a third-year animal science major. A Department of Animal and Dairy Science teaching assistant and a small-animal internal medicine orderly at the UGA veterinary medicine hospital, Fenster also works with first-year students as a mentor in the UGA Honors Program’s Peer Assisted Leadership program.Fenster intends to use her Ratcliffe Scholar funds to support her summer internship in hog production with Smithfield Foods. This internship will expose her to new areas of swine production and veterinary medicine, adding dimension to her understanding of large-scale food organizations.Finley is a third-year student majoring in biological science and minoring in public health. On campus, she serves as a resident assistant at Busbee Hall and as an officer in the Minorities in Agriculture, Natural Resources and Related Sciences organization and One Health Club.Finley plans to use her scholarship to study abroad in Cortona, Italy, where she will learn about the health implications of wine consumption and the economic impact of the wine industry.Kessler is a third-year student majoring in environmental economics and management and minoring in Spanish. On campus, she is the president of the Agricultural and Environmental Economics Club; a board member for Bag the Bag UGA, an environmental activism organization; and the treasurer of the Georgia Chapter of the Society for Conservation Biology.Kessler plans to use her scholarship toward her stay in Washington, D.C., this summer, where she will intern with an environmental organization that focuses on environmental justice, climate change and renewable energy. She considers environmental service extremely important, and this internship is instrumental in meeting her long-term goal of a career in environmental policy.For more information about the Ratcliffe Scholars Program and experiential learning activities available to CAES students, visit www.students.caes.uga.edu.last_img read more

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Ehrlich chair established at UF

first_img January 1, 2006 Regular News Ehrlich chair established at UF The memory of the late Florida Supreme Court Chief Justice Raymond Ehrlich will live on in the form of a new eminent scholar chair at the University of Florida’s Levin College of Law.Ehrlich, a UF law alumnus who died in July, made provisions in his estate to establish an eminent scholar chair in the law school and another in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. The positions were established in the name of Justice Ehrlich and his late wife, Mary, in honor of Ehrlich’s parents, Ben and Esther Ehrlich.“Justice Ehrlich was a giant in the legal profession,” said Dean Robert Jerry. “His wisdom and thoughts will be impossible to replicate, but his commitment to professionalism will resonate with our students for generations to come.”A 1942 graduate of the law school, Ehrlich practiced law in the Jacksonville area for 35 years before being nominated to the Florida Supreme Court. He served there for 10 years, including two years as chief justice. Ehrlich was appointed special counsel to Sen. Bob Graham in 1991, and received The Florida Bar Foundation’s Medal of Honor Award in 1993 for outstanding contributions to the administration of justice. Ehrlich chair established at UFlast_img read more

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How to enjoy your work more

first_img 43SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,John Pettit John Pettit is the Managing Editor for CUInsight.com. John manages the content on the site, including current news, editorial, press releases, jobs and events. He keeps the credit union … Web: www.cuinsight.com Details Studies have shown that 20% of people enjoy their jobs, 20% dislike their jobs, and the rest are just kind of “meh” on the subject. If you have a job that you’re passionate about, that is fantastic news. For those of you who are in the other 80%, here are a few ways you can enjoy your job more.Get rid of the negativity: If you want to be a better mood at work, you have to step letting others bring you down. While co-workers aren’t always to blame, when a cloud of negativity is overhead, it’s hard to see the sunshine. Keep this in mind the next time you’re listening to Negative Nancy complain about work.Do some research: If the job has you down, figure out what the root issue is. Is it something you can easily fix? Great. Get to fixing it. Not an easy problem to solve? Decide if there’s hope for change or it you’re going to be able to deal with it. At this point you have to make a decision to either find something else to do or stick it out and hope things get better.Surround yourself with positivity: Regardless of the negatives around you, there must be some positives to your job or else you never would have accepted the position in the first place. Think about the ways in which you help your customers. Every day, you get to help your customers find solutions to problems. They really appreciate what you do for them. Being able to help your fellow man is a great feeling. Try to focus on that every morning when you crawl out of bed.last_img read more

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NAFCU Fed Report: Reg relief needed to sustain CU growth

first_imgThe 2018 NAFCU Report on Credit Unions is now available online. The report shows, among other things, that the credit union industry continues to strengthen and see membership growth, although compliance burdens have led to industry consolidation.“Our 2018 NAFCU Report on Credit Unions shows that credit unions play a critical role in the economy to the tune of $16 billion annually and continually work to meet the needs of their local communities and members,” said NAFCU President and CEO Dan Berger. “The credit union industry remains well-capitalized, financially sound and committed to its members – which is why the industry saw over 4 percent membership growth during the past year.“More than 114 million Americans are members of a credit union, where 300,000 credit union employees work daily to provide them with the best service possible. However, regulatory and compliance burdens still weigh heavily on the industry’s ability to serve its membership. That’s why it’s so important to NAFCU – the industry’s Washington Watchdog – to ensure that the interests of the nation’s 5,500 federally insured credit unions are effectively represented,” Berger added. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading »last_img read more

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Michael Myers: Brand ambassador champion

first_img continue reading » When partnering with credit unions and banks on brand and consumer experience initiatives, we counsel that all employees are brand ambassadors.That is to say, every employee from the CEO on down serves as a representative of their brand…and not just during traditional hours or within the four walls of an office.I learned this lesson firsthand during an awesome encounter on a flight to South Carolina earlier this year.In route to work with a credit union on their brand initiative, I had the pleasure of sitting next to a gentleman whose face seemed familiar to me. After thinking on it a few minutes, I leaned over and asked “Excuse me, but are you James Jude Courtney?” He very politely confirmed his identity, shook my hand and engaged in pleasant small talk.If the name isn’t familiar, Mr. Courtney is the actor who portrayed masked killer Michael Myers in the successful 2018 Halloween reboot. I’m a huge fan of both the 1978 classic original and the popular reboot, so it was a big deal for this fan-boy. James Jude Courtney at the “Halloween” Premiere at the TCL Chinese Theater IMAX on October 17, 2018 in Los Angeles, CAcenter_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Study: Most flu cases in small children missed

first_img The researchers collected nasal and throat specimens from each child for testing by viral culture and reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The study involved prospective testing of children who were hospitalized or received outpatient treatment for acute respiratory tract infection or fever in three urban counties. The New Vaccine Surveillance Network, set up in 1999 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, conducted the study, with Katherine M. Poehling, MD, of Vanderbilt University as first author. The investigators calculated that the average rate of hospitalization for confirmed influenza among children under age 5 in the three counties was 0.9 per 1,000 children from 2000 to 2004 (95% confidence interval, 0.8 to 1.1 per 1,000). The hospitalization rates varied by age-group within that age range: 4.5 per 1,000 for children aged 0 to 5 months, 0.9 per 1,000 for ages 6 to 23 months, and 0.3 per 1,000 for those aged 24 to 59 months. Healthcare providers identified flu in only 28% of young children who were hospitalized because of the illness and in only 17% of those who were treated in a clinic or hospital emergency department, according to a report in the Jul 6 New England Journal of Medicine. In his editorial, Glezen, of Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, comments that children shed larger amounts of influenza virus for longer periods than adults do. “Treatment of these younger patients even three to four days after the onset of infection may at least reduce the spread of infection to contacts,” he writes. He adds that when flu is recognized in a child, clinicians can offer preventive treatment to the child’s family members. In the outpatient wing of the study, 1,742 children were enrolled, of whom 274 (16%) had lab-confirmed flu. Healthcare providers recognized flu in only 17% of these 274 children, according to the report. “This lack of recognition represents a missed opportunity to reduce both the risk of complications and the spread of the virus to contacts,” writes W. Paul Glezen, MD, in an editorial accompanying the report. “We found a much higher burden of influenza infection in the outpatient setting than in the inpatient setting, a large variation in burden according to the year and site, and a lack of clinical recognition of influenza during most visits,” the authors write. The report comes in the wake of a new federal recommendation that all 2-, 3-, and 4-year-olds should be vaccinated against flu every year. The same recommendation was made 2 years ago for children between 6 and 23 months old. The study also indicated that outpatient visits related to flu were between 10 and 250 times as common as flu-related hospitalizations, suggesting that increased flu immunization could reduce medical visits and costs. Poehling KA, Edwards KM, Weinberg GA, et al. The underrecognized burden of influenza in young children. N Engl J Med 2006 Jul 6;355(1):31-40 [Abstract] Using their data, the authors estimated that 56 of every 1,000 children in the three counties were taken to a clinic or emergency department because of flu in 2002-03. In the 2003-04 season, the estimated number of visits jumped to 122 per 1,000. The rate of outpatient visits was highest in children 6 to 23 months old and lowest in those 0 to 5 months old. The failure to recognize flu means children are not getting antiviral drugs that could ease their symptoms, especially if given in the first 2 days of illness. About 35% of the sick children in the study saw a healthcare provider within the first 2 days of symptom onset. The hospital component of the study ran from October 2000 through September 2004 in Rochester, N.Y., and Nashville, and from October 2003 through September 2004 in Cincinnati. The outpatient part of the study was done in selected clinics and emergency departments during the 2002-03 and 2003-04 flu seasons in Nashville and Rochester and in 2003-04 in Cincinnati. They found that about 35% of the children with flu were taken to a medical provider within 2 days after they became ill, “when antiviral medications may have shortened the duration and severity of illness,” the report says. Increased use of rapid tests for influenza could not only increase the use of antivirals, but also improve infection control and boost the use of flu vaccine, the article states. Noting that flu-related outpatient visits vastly outnumbered hospitalizations, the authors write, “Although the rationale for enhanced vaccination against influenza in children has been based primarily on hospitalization rates, reducing the number of outpatient visits attributable to the prevention of influenza by vaccination would have an even greater effect on costs.” Jul 7, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – Physicians miss the diagnosis of influenza in children under age 5 most of the time, according to researchers who tested thousands of sick children for flu in three US counties over several years. Among 2,797 hospitalized children enrolled in the study, the authors found 160 (6%) laboratory-confirmed cases of flu. Only 28% of these had a flu diagnosis at the time of discharge (the surveillance test results were not available to clinicians before discharge). Only 52 of the 160 children diagnosed by the authors received a flu test as part of their clinical care, and 38 of these 52 tested positive, according to the report. Eighty percent (148) of the children with lab-confirmed flu were younger than 2 years. Glezen WP. Influenza control. (Editorial) N Engl J Med 2006 Jul 6;355(1):79-81 [Introduction]last_img read more

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