Employers rebrand training as apprenticeships to access levy fund

first_img No comments yet. Leave a Reply Click here to cancel reply.Comment Name (required) Email (will not be published) (required) Website REX/SHUTTERSTOCK Almost half (46%) of employers plan to repackage their existing training schemes as new apprenticeships in order to access their £15,000 training fund provided by the apprenticeship levy.A survey of more than 1,000 employers by the CIPD found that more than half (53%) of employers that pay the apprenticeship levy would prefer a more flexible training levy that is more suitable for their training requirements.More than half of the group that plan to rebadge their existing training schemes expect to create level 2 apprenticeships, equivalent to five GCSEs, to ensure they are able to use the apprenticeship fund, rather than creating an apprenticeship from scratch.The CIPD’s ‘Assessing the early impact of the apprenticeship levy’ report also suggested that a fifth (19%) of employers subject to the levy do not expect to use their apprenticeship allowance at all, and will simply write off the levy as a tax.Apprenticeship levyWhat is the apprenticeship levy?What will employers be able to spend apprenticeship levy funding on?Lizzie Crowley, skills adviser at the CIPD, said the apprenticeship levy was creating extra bureaucracy and cost for employers, rather than creating additional value as intended.She said: “Apprenticeships are extremely important, but other forms of training are equally valuable and often more flexible and better suited to the needs of organisations.“A move to a more flexible training levy would have the effect of continuing to prompt greater employer investment in skills, including apprenticeships, but in a way that is much more responsive to employers’ needs.”Crowley said a consequence of repackaging existing training as apprenticeships was that many of them were being offered to older employees in more senior positions, rather than meeting the levy’s original aim of helping businesses employ younger people.She said: “The Government needs to seriously review the levy to ensure it is flexible enough to respond to employers’ needs and to drive the greater investment in high quality training and workplace skills needed to boost UK productivity.“There also needs to be much better support for SMEs, both for those that pay the levy and those that don’t, to help them to design and implement effective apprenticeship schemes.”The report recommended the Government to run a campaign to promote the levy among SMEs and commission a review into whether apprenticeships are providing quality education.Employers began paying the levy last April, but between May and July 2017 the number of people starting an apprenticeship decreased to 48,000 from 117,800 in the same period of the previous year.The CIPD’s survey also found that 22% of employers do not know whether they are paying the levy, which applies to employers with an annual payroll of more than £3m and is charged at 0.5% of their employees’ total salary.The research echoes similar findings last summer by the CBI and Pearson which found that 63% of employers planned to reconfigure existing training into apprenticeships and 27% expected to cut back on non-apprenticeship training activity to meet levy costs. Previous Article Next Article Employers rebrand training as apprenticeships to access levy fundBy Ashleigh Webber on 11 Jan 2018 in Apprenticeships, Personnel Today, Qualifications, Training delivery, Training methods, Training strategies Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Phytoplankton ecology in an Antarctic lake

first_imgSUMMARY. The ecology of the phytoplankton of Heywood Lake, Signy Island, South Orkney Islands, Antarctica was investigated during 1969–72. The lake, which is ice‐covered for 8–10 months per year, is moderately eutrophic due to enrichment by seal excreta. The annual cycle of the phytoplankton is described. During the winter (approximately May‐September), very few algal cells could be detected in the water column and 14C fixation was below measurable limits. In spring (October‐November), a rapidly‐growing population of algae caused a large increase in the chlorophyll‐a concentration (maximum value 170 mg m−2) but carbon fixation remained low, with values 3 g C m−2 day−1 were measured on bright days. Values for Assimilation Number were very high (maximum value 10.5 mg C h−1 mg−1 (chlorophyll‐a) in January (1971) though temperatures never exceeded 8°C. In autumn, the phytoplankton regressed to winter levels. Both spring and summer algal populations probably overwinter as resting stages.last_img read more

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Aldi Christmas pud sales soar

first_imgMore than 52,000 of Aldi’s Christmas puddings have been sold in the last 17 days, a 43% increase year-on-year.It comes as the discount food retailer’s Orange Topped Christmas Pudding, priced at £7.99, was ranked second in a taste test conducted by Good Housekeeping magazine, beating the likes of Fortnum & Mason whose upmarket version of the festive pudding was placed 29th out of 32 products.Aldi explained that since its Christmas puddings went on sale on 5 November, 255 have been sold every hour during the 17-day period.A spokesperson from Aldi said: “The sales data shows that the traditional Christmas Pudding is a clear favourite for the annual festive feast this year. At Aldi we are surprised to see it flying off the shelves so early. It’s testament to the fact that shoppers this yuletide are seeking value as well as quality for their Christmas shop.“As we have such a great selection of puddings ranging from our traditional to our connoisseur, we have something to suit every taste and wallet.”The firm said its range of Christmas puddings has been popular with its customers in the south east, selling on average four-times more than in Scotland – a 416% difference in sales between the north and south.Aldi described its Orange Topped Christmas Pudding as a Heston Blumenthal-inspired product containing sultanas, whole cherries, almonds, pecans, Spanish sherry, French Cognac and rum, topped with whole candied orange slices.last_img read more

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Spielberg on Spielberg

first_imgWhat do a man-eating shark and a maniacal truck driver have in common? They both helped launch Steven Spielberg’s career. During an appearance at Harvard on Tuesday, the Oscar-winning director recalled the offbeat stars of his early movies and explained the bedrock influences behind his decades of notable filmmaking.Harvard President Drew Faust introduced the session, which was sponsored by the Mahindra Humanities Center’s Rita E. Hauser Forum for the Arts, welcoming Spielberg as a fellow historian, and “as much an educator as an artist.”Center director Homi Bhabha oversaw the 90-minute conversation with the director, which included questions from the audience. Bhabha, who structured the evening around clips from Spielberg films, opened with a snippet from the 1971 TV movie “Duel,” about a motorist terrorized by the mysterious driver of a tractor-trailer truck.The film had a particular relevance because it was the first project Spielberg really “went after,” he said, and because he was “terrified of merging onto any freeway anywhere in the country.”“I didn’t relate to ‘Duel’ as something that might have happened to me, being bullied or anything when I was a child. I related to ‘Duel’ because I was terrified of trucks. And I thought ‘This is perfect. If they only give me the job, I know how to scare people because I know what scares me.’”He knew how scare people with his next movie, too. Many in the audience groaned when composer John Williams’ menacing score started during a clip from “Jaws,” the 1975 film that changed the way many beachgoers played in the surf. The film also revolutionized the movie industry. It was widely considered the first summer blockbuster and introduced studio executives to the financial power of a summer thriller distributed in wide release.Spielberg said he got the directing job by pitching the producers on the idea that “‘Jaws’ was ‘Duel’ on the water.”“‘I can do the shark like the truck, I swear.’ That’s exactly what I said … and they hired me.”Spielberg said he relates to the clip, in which a shark kills a boy, much differently today as a father than he did as a budding filmmaker looking to move the story along. “What really pains me is when the mom comes down [to the shore], and she can’t find her son. … Now I look at that, and it has an entirely different meaning to me.”But when he created that scene, he recalled, careful preparation was critical.“What I think is essential for filmmakers to really learn how to do … is to see the scene first in their head, figure it out almost mathematically, and then go out and shoot it.”The Ohio native’s interest in films came by way of his childhood love of crashing his electric toy trains together, he told Bhabha. “I had grown accustomed to the destruction … I couldn’t live without it.” When his father threatened to take the trains away if he continued to break them, Spielberg grabbed his father’s eight-millimeter Kodak movie camera and captured a crash on film instead.He never broke his toys trains again.“I watched that crash over and over and over again, and it sated me enough. And that was really the first movie I ever made.”He called his 1982 science-fiction film “E.T.,” about an alien left behind on Earth and his friendship with a lonely young boy, his “first truly personal film,” explaining how he combined a story about his parents’ divorce with the idea of an abandoned creature. The extraterrestrial was inspired by Spielberg’s prior work on the 1977 science fiction hit “Close Encounters of the Third Kind,” by his boyhood fascination with the stars, and by his belief that “there’s no possible mathematical way that we ever could be alone in the universe.”At its core, Spielberg added, “E.T.” is a story of repair.“I also thought that if you could learn to love something that looks like [E.T.], then that opens your empathic pathways in all directions, including healing and repairing the damage done in a divorce.”Family, empathy, and reconciliation became familiar themes in his work, and he often offered audiences a resolution at the end of his films. For him, the period 1933 to 1959 constitutes the golden era of films, since most movies made then involve “stories that completely resolve themselves.”“I am a guilty party to wanting to complete the sentence by the end of the picture. The audience has made an investment, and I usually try to find some way to put a period on it.”Children are often key players in his films because they offer the audience an “unfiltered, genuine” perspective.His topical films, such as “Lincoln,” “Munich,” and “Saving Private Ryan,” developed out of his passion for history, instilled in him by his father, a World War II veteran who hosted reunions with other veterans in the Spielberg living room.“I got to hear stories about freedom and stories about sacrifice. … All of this … led me to a love of history, and I just became fascinated with it, all those values.”Asked by Bhabha what will happen to filmmaking when the “public audiences for cinema diminish” as viewers gravitate to newer technologies, Spielberg was optimistic, insisting that there will always be a place for movies “in some form or another as a public communion.”“There may be a different technology, but we are always going to come together to have the experience. I can’t imagine any time in the near or distant future where people are going to want to be entertained or informed by themselves or with just one or two people around. We’re a society that needs company.”Offering hope to young directors in the audience Spielberg said he frequently finds new talent via the Internet, which he called “a huge theater to audition who you are and what you have to say about yourself in the world.”He also said he ignores technique in favor of storytelling, searching instead for “people who are saying something to us that we don’t hear every day.”“I don’t look for craft anymore. I am not looking for where the camera goes, what the lighting looks like. I am looking for a new idea when I look for a new young filmmaker.”last_img read more

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Flag football: more than a game

first_imgWith the college football and National Football League seasons well underway, Notre Dame students have been anticipating the kickoff of one more season: flag football, which officially began on Sunday.A decades-old tradition at Notre Dame dating back to 1975, flag football has become an integral part of the fall semester for many students. Assistant director of intramural sports Arianne Judy said this is partly due to the inclusive nature of the sport. Observer File Photo A student representing Welsh Family Hall evades a defender from Pangborn Hall during a women’s interhall flag football championship in Notre Dame Stadium in Nov. 2014.“Flag football is kind of … a sport that skill and previous knowledge … play a part in people being successful or wanting to participate, but … you don’t have to have that knowledge and/or experience and you can still participate in it,” Judy said. “Typically, if you think of gender norms or stereotypical kids growing up, a lot of women don’t get the opportunity to play [football]. And so that’s what makes our interhall league so popular and so much fun.”Sophomore Meg Wagner, co-captian of the Pasquerilla West Hall B team, echoed Judy and said she was happy to be able to pick up the sport so easily without any prior experience.“I was a cheerleader so I never played … [anything] that involved catching a ball or doing anything like that. So last year when I came out I was really nervous,” Wagner said. “It comes really easily. I thought for sure I would just be riding the bench, but I played and it was not as hard as I thought it would be. It’s definitely fun and easy to pick up.”Popularity for the women’s interhall flag football league, with 14 women’s halls represented in the A league and seven with additional teams in the B league this year, also stems from its affiliation with community, Judy said.“There’s definitely that community base to it, and I think with that comes the accountability piece, too,” she said. “There’s that hall allegiance.”Wagner said she uses flag football as a way to meet more people in her hall who she wouldn’t necessarily cross paths with otherwise.“I’ve become closer with girls I wouldn’t have been friends with,” she said. “There’s a lot of freshmen and girls that aren’t in my section, so I get to know them just because I’m on their team and we play together and get to work at practice together.”Another attraction for the women’s interhall leagues is the championship games being held on the field in Notre Dame Stadium, Judy said, an honor originally reserved only for the men’s interhall tackle football games.“We are very fortunate to have the relationship that we have with athletics as far as being able to use that facility,” she said. “Here, it’s different just because of the rich tradition and the football history for the students to be able to play on the field. It is a big deal to play at Knute Rockne’s stadium.”Wagner said she and her team appreciate the significance of this unique opportunity.“It’s a very rare experience, obviously,” she said. “To be on the Notre Dame football field is not something that many kids get to do even when they go here, so being able to have pictures and to have that memory is really special just because Notre Dame football is such a big deal, so when you get older, being able to say that you were on the field and you actually got to play a game is very rare and special.”Judy said there are other factors that lead to participation in co-rec or all-campus men’s flag football teams, such as wanting to play a sport with friends that might be outside one’s hall.“In our co-rec leagues, it really is dependent that you reach out and get teams together with friends and people that are outside,” she said. “It’s more of an opportunity to get your friends together … [and] it brings in a mix of students.”Senior flag football official Timothy Zdunek said he was excited to discover how many students participated in flag football in one way or another.“I knew that interhall tackle football was big for the guys’ dorms, but I didn’t realize how big it could be for, obviously, the women’s dorms and then co-rec and all-campus guys leagues,” Zdunek said. “I was rather surprised to see how so many students competed in flag football here. It was really great to see.”Judy said each flag football league plays by the National Intramural and Recreational Sports Association (NIRSA) rules, which have been adjusted over the years to create a more unique environment for the sport.“Originally, I think that they tried to have a large affiliation with high school rules for tackle football — obviously modified to make flag football a non-contact sport,” she said. “I think that, over time, they really have focused on creating rules that are more in line with creating the atmosphere that they want.”These rules are enforced by student officials, creating an additional entry point for students who want to be involved with flag football in some way. Zdunek said he became a flag football official to become involved with football on campus, even though he doesn’t play.“It just looked really cool as a way to get close to the action and everything without playing because I know I’m not exactly the greatest athlete in the world,” he said. “This was a way for me to really stay involved in that kind of stuff.”For Wagner, the women’s interhall B league serves as a good way for students who live in dorms where flag football is too popular for just one team to get involved.“It’s really nice just because I don’t think I’m skilled enough to be on A team, [and] it’s a lot less pressure,” Wagner said. “So obviously, the girls that are competitive and want to have a competitive nature go up on A team and that’s for them, but B team is a lot more relaxed and low-pressure. And we have a lot more fun, I think.”Tags: co-rec sports, flag football, Interhall, Interhall Football, NIRSA, RecSportslast_img read more

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Dworkin Wins National Recognition

first_imgDworkin’s Leadership Wins National RecognitionFormer Vermont Public Service Board Chairman Michael Dworkin has won a national award recognizing his work in founding the Vermont Law School’s Institute for Energy and the Environment.The Mary Kilmarx Award is given annually by the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners’ Energy Resources and the Environment (ERE) Committee to someone whose work reflects the Committee’s goals of promoting good government, clean energy and the environment.”Michael Dworkin’s work in the energy and environmental field is internationally known, and his commitment to education and conservation as demonstrated with the Institute for Energy and the Environment made him an ideal candidate for the Mary Kilmarx Award,” said Commissioner Rick Morgan of the District of Columbia, who presented the award on behalf of the ERE Committee. “This Award recognizes those who have gone above and beyond the call of duty-traits that personify Michael Dworkin.”Dworkin was presented the award on Nov. 17 during NARUC’s 120th Annual Convention in New Orleans. ERE members had several reasons to present Dworkin with the award-notably his past chairmanship of the Vermont Public Service Board and the ERE Committee, and his work with the Institute for Energy and the Environment.Dworkin founded the Institute in 2005 after leaving the Public Service Board. The Institute is an international resource for energy law and policy. It offers a full course curriculum during the academic year and a series of summer seminars as well. The Institute’s student researchers work on pressing energy concerns such as energy self-reliance, carbon sequestration, and renewable energy sources. “The Institute is about building the right mix for thinking with global ideals and acting with rigorous pragmatism,” Dworkin said. “Our mission is to have fewer greenhouse gas emissions in 50 years because of the work we do today, and in 100 years because of the work our students do tomorrow. Its been a joy to find that Vermont Law provides a base for paralleling the work that Mary Kilmarx taught so many NARUC members to pursue for just such goals.”First awarded in 2002, the honor is named for Mary Kilmarx, a former commissioner and staff member at the Rhode Island Public Utilities Commission, who served as staff co-chair of the ERE Committee when it was called the Energy Conservation Committee and provided its members with inspiration for many years.Past winners of the Kilmarx Award are: Former Montana Public Service Commissioner Bob Anderson; Former Vermont Public Service Board Chairman Richard Cowart; the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Kathleen Hogan; Former Maine Public Utilities Commission member Cheryl Harrington; Natural Resources Defense Council Senior Attorney Ralph Cavanagh; and Executive Director of the Southwest Energy Efficiency Project Howard Geller.last_img read more

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The Economic Case for Solar, Not the Climate-Change Case, Is Driving Its Uptake Across the Southern U.S.

first_imgThe Economic Case for Solar, Not the Climate-Change Case, Is Driving Its Uptake Across the Southern U.S. FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享InsideClimate News:When Brandon Presley was elected to the Mississippi Public Service Commission in 2007, he said, he couldn’t have found a solar farm “with a SWAT team and a search warrant.”A decade later, Mississippi is one of the fastest-growing solar markets in the United States, according to GTM Research. The state’s public service commission approved several solar projects this summer, and the state is expected to gain more than 700 megawatts of solar capacity over the next five years.One of the its newest projects is a 52-megawatt solar farm near Hattiesburg. A partnership between Mississippi Power, the state’s largest utility, and Silicon Ranch, a solar energy company based in Nashville, Tennessee, the 450-acre solar farm will eventually power 6,500 homes.“I think everybody wants to be more energy independent, and that’s part of the public buzz around the solar industry in our state,” Presley said.Combined, the Southern states would equal the sixth-largest greenhouse gas-emitting country in the world, said Michael Vandenbergh, a law professor at Vanderbilt University. But that argument doesn’t resonate in many conservative areas. “People associate climate mitigation with big government, and that’s particularly true in the South,” he said.What is resonating with utility companies like Mississippi Power and communities like Hattiesburg is the economic argument for cheaper solar power.Despite the lack of renewable-energy-friendly policies and the reluctance from Republican-led state legislatures to address climate change, states across the South and Appalachia―regions that voted heavily for Donald Trump―are rapidly expanding their solar markets.Most of that growth has come from utilities investing in large-scale solar projects, which have dropped in price by nearly 80 percent since 2010 to 6 cents per kilowatt-hour, making them more cost-competitive with coal and natural gas. There’s also a grassroots rooftop solar movement in coal-friendly communities, encouraged by cheap technology and a push for energy independence.To get communities, investors and utilities on board, renewable energy companies like Silicon Ranch have focused on the economic benefits of clean energy, rather than climate science or environmental regulations.“Climate change is never coming up in any development activity [conversations],” said Matt Beasley, chief marketing officer of Silicon Ranch. “It’s not a talking point―it’s always about economics.”When Silicon Ranch was founded in 2011, the idea that a national solar energy company could survive and thrive in Nashville, while the rest of the industry was based in California and the Southwest, “was unimaginable,” Beasley said. But the young team focused its efforts in the sunny Southeast, states with plenty of solar power potential.Since then, utilities around the country have closed an increasing number of aging coal-fired generators, and wind and solar have become the fastest-growing sources of electricity in the U.S. It’s partly due to tax credits for clean energy industries that Congress extended in 2015, which are supposed to phase out in the 2020s. Rural states also got help from an Obama-era Department of Agriculture program called the Rural Energy for America Program, which gave more than $280 million in funding for rural solar projects in 2015 and 2016.More: 2 Reasons Solar Is Booming in Trump Country: Price and Energy Independencelast_img read more

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Enel says pandemic not likely to slow its renewable energy development plans

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence ($):Renewables giant Enel SpA is predicting a wave of consolidation in the green energy sector as smaller companies come under financial pressure from the effects of the coronavirus, opening a window for well-financed players to snap up cheap wind and solar assets.“I think the current crisis could potentially open up opportunities, mainly for who has big financial shoulders,” Alberto de Paoli, the Italian utility’s CFO, said on a May 6 earnings call. “It will be possible to identify, towards year-end, those players that managed through the crisis and those that did not,” the CFO said. “A new phase of M&A will arrive — not now, but in the later part of the year.”In the meantime, Enel is expecting the coronavirus crisis to barely dent its own roll-out of new renewables capacity. The company has about 3,200 MW either under construction or ready to build for 2020, with another 400 MW fully permitted. Although impacts from the lockdowns could delay a small share of the capacity, the company expects to catch up with no more than a few months’ delay.The group reported €1.25 billion in profits during the first quarter, a marginal decrease from the prior-year period, although the result was up 11% when excluding one-off impacts. However, total revenues were down 12% to €19.99 billion, partly because coronavirus containment measures led to lower electricity sales in Italy and Spain, two of Enel’s core markets.Since lockdowns were only in effect for the last two weeks of the reporting period, the company expects the impact to be more pronounced in the second quarter. Nevertheless, analysts said the company should see little impact from the crisis, given its largely regulated business and other safeguards.“We continue to believe that networks and renewables growth will be largely unfazed,” analysts at Bernstein wrote in a note ahead of the earnings release. “Exposure to lower power prices is limited via hedging, including an intrinsic hedge embedded in the integrated business models in Italy and Spain.”[Yannic Rack]More ($): Enel predicts ‘new phase of M&A’ after companies emerge from coronavirus crisis Enel says pandemic not likely to slow its renewable energy development planslast_img read more

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Hicksville Crash Leaves Pedestrian Dead

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A pedestrian was fatally struck by a vehicle in Hicksville on Tuesday morning.Nassau County police said the victim was struck on Old Country Road near the corner of Levittown Parkway shortly before 6 a.m.The victim’s identity was not immediately available.The westbound lanes of Old Country Road were closed for four hours while investigators were on the scene.Detectives are continuing the investigation into the cause of the crash.last_img

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Liverpool vs Leicester live on Sky Sports | Football News

first_imgIn a statement, the league confirmed ‘all fixtures from Saturday 21 November, and throughout the Christmas and New Year period, will be made available to fans to watch live in the UK.’‘There is a full schedule of Premier League games over the festive period and clubs are committed to an accessible solution for fans. These plans have been made with the cooperation of our broadcast partners, working with us to deliver these additional matches while stadiums are missing the supporters who are such an integral part of the game.’Liverpool vs Leicester – which has been rescheduled for a 7.15pm kick-off on Sunday night – is one of three extra matches to be shown on Sky Sports next weekend.- Advertisement – Everton vs Leeds and West Brom vs Sheffield United on Saturday November 28 will be followed a day later by Southampton vs Man Utd, Chelsea vs Tottenham and Arsenal vs Wolves live on Sky Sports.The weekend will then be rounded off by Leicester vs Fulham and West Ham vs Aston Villa on Monday November 30.November’s Premier League rearranged scheduleSaturday November 21Newcastle United vs Chelsea – Kick-off 12.30pmAston Villa vs Brighton – Kick-off 3pmTottenham v Man City – Kick-off 5.30pm, Live on Sky SportsManchester United vs West Brom – Kick-off 8pmSunday November 22Fulham vs Everton – Kick-off 12pmSheffield United vs West Ham – Kick-off 2pm, Live on Sky SportsLeeds United vs Arsenal – Kick-off 4.30pm, Live on Sky SportsLiverpool vs Leicester City – Kick-off 7.15pm, Live on Sky SportsMonday November 23Burnley vs Crystal Palace – Kick-off 5.30pm, Live on Sky SportsWolves vs Southampton – Kick-off 8pm, Live on Sky SportsFriday November 27Crystal Palace vs Newcastle – Kick-off 8pmSaturday November 28Brighton vs Liverpool – Kick-off 12.30pmMan City vs Burnley – Kick-off 3pmEverton vs Leeds – Kick-off 5.30pm, Live on Sky SportsWest Brom vs Sheffield United – Kick-off 8pm, Live on Sky SportsSunday November 29Southampton vs Man Utd – Kick-off 2pm, Live on Sky SportsChelsea vs Tottenham – Kick-off 4.30pm, Live on Sky SportsArsenal vs Wolves – Kick-off 7.15pm, Live on Sky SportsMonday November 30Leicester City v Fulham – Kick-off 5.30pm, Live on Sky SportsWest Ham vs Aston Villa – Kick-off 8pm, Live on Sky SportsConfirmed Premier League fixtures on Sky SportsSat Nov 21: Tottenham vs Man City – Kick-Off 5.30pmSun Nov 22: Sheffield United vs West Ham – Kick-Off 2pmSun Nov 22: Leeds vs Arsenal – Kick-Off 4.30pmSun Nov 22: Liverpool vs Leicester City – Kick-off 7.15pmMon Nov 23: Burnley vs Crystal Palace – Kick-off 5.30pmMon Nov 23: Wolves vs Southampton – Kick-off 8pmSat Nov 28: Everton vs Leeds – Kick-Off 5.30pmSat Nov 28: West Brom vs Sheffield United – Kick-Off 8pmSun Nov 29: Southampton vs Man Utd – Kick-Off 2pmSun Nov 29: Chelsea vs Tottenham – Kick-Off 4.30pmSun Nov 29: Arsenal vs Wolves – Kick-Off 7.15pmMon Nov 30: Leicester vs Fulham – Kick-Off 5.30pmMon Nov 30: West Ham vs Aston Villa – Kick-Off 8pmMore fixtures to follow in due course – Advertisement – Liverpool vs Leicester will be shown live on Sky Sports next week when the Premier League champions take on the current league leaders in a mouth-watering top-of-the-table clash. The match has been confirmed as being broadcast live on Sky Sports following the Premier League’s decision to discontinue the pay-per-view model which was introduced in October.- Advertisement – Burnley vs Crystal Palace and Wolves vs Southampton will also be broadcast live on Monday November 23.Sky Sports had already confirmed it would broadcast Tottenham vs Man City next weekend on Saturday November 21 followed by a Super Sunday double-header of Sheffield United vs West Ham and Leeds vs Arsenal.On the final weekend of November, seven matches will be broadcast live on Sky Sports with a triple-header on Sunday, November 29 that features Man Utd, Chelsea, Tottenham and Arsenal.- Advertisement –last_img read more

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