Watch George Porter Jr. & Brandon “Taz” Niederauer Jam “Be Careful Who You Idolize” At The Cap

first_imgLast night, Joan Jett and the Blackhearts held a fundraiser for Big Brothers Big Sisters of Family Services of Westchester at The Capitol Theatre with Christina Bianco, George Porter Jr., Brandon “Taz” Niederauer, and more. Big Brothers Big Sisters is a youth mentoring organization. By matching adult volunteers, “Bigs,” with children, “Littles,” facing adversity, they are able to accomplish their mission of “helping children reach and realize their potential.” Big Brothers Big Sisters of FSW provides at-risk children with strong, positive and enduring one-to-one relationships that change their lives for the better, forever.As part of The Really Big Show, the musicians came together in this spirit of goodness. The beloved NOLA funk bassist joined forces with young musicians, guitarist Brandon Niederauer and drummer Jager Soss for two songs: “Be Careful Who You Idolize” by George Porter Jr & Runnin’ Pardners and “Voodoo Child” by Jimi Hendrix. You can watch their first performance together below, courtesy of Jon Hammer:Tonight, The Capitol Theatre in Port Chester, NY will host JAM THE VOTE, featuring the Preservation Hall Jazz Band & The Blind Boys of Alabama in a multi-act, classic New Orleans-style jam session. Thirty-six hours before Election Day, the once-in-a-lifetime house band will create a “Night for the Soul.” And the special guests include Alex Ebert (Edward Sharpe & Magnetic Zeros), Amayo (Antibalas), Amy Helm, Andy Falco (Infamous Stringdusters), Craig Finn (The Hold Steady), DJ Logic, Eugene Hutz (Gogol Bordello), Eric Krasno, George Porter Jr. (The Meters), Irma Thomas, Ivan Neville, Joe Russo (Joe Russo’s Almost Dead), Lee Fields, Marc Brownstein (Disco Biscuits), Matisyahu, Nicole Atkins, Questlove, Robert Randolph, Tom Hamilton (Joe Russo’s Almost Dead), Valerie June, Win Butler (Arcade Fire) and more! Free stream is available to those who pledge to vote. Find out more here.[Photo courtesy of Greg Horowitz]last_img read more

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Spielberg on Spielberg

first_imgWhat do a man-eating shark and a maniacal truck driver have in common? They both helped launch Steven Spielberg’s career. During an appearance at Harvard on Tuesday, the Oscar-winning director recalled the offbeat stars of his early movies and explained the bedrock influences behind his decades of notable filmmaking.Harvard President Drew Faust introduced the session, which was sponsored by the Mahindra Humanities Center’s Rita E. Hauser Forum for the Arts, welcoming Spielberg as a fellow historian, and “as much an educator as an artist.”Center director Homi Bhabha oversaw the 90-minute conversation with the director, which included questions from the audience. Bhabha, who structured the evening around clips from Spielberg films, opened with a snippet from the 1971 TV movie “Duel,” about a motorist terrorized by the mysterious driver of a tractor-trailer truck.The film had a particular relevance because it was the first project Spielberg really “went after,” he said, and because he was “terrified of merging onto any freeway anywhere in the country.”“I didn’t relate to ‘Duel’ as something that might have happened to me, being bullied or anything when I was a child. I related to ‘Duel’ because I was terrified of trucks. And I thought ‘This is perfect. If they only give me the job, I know how to scare people because I know what scares me.’”He knew how scare people with his next movie, too. Many in the audience groaned when composer John Williams’ menacing score started during a clip from “Jaws,” the 1975 film that changed the way many beachgoers played in the surf. The film also revolutionized the movie industry. It was widely considered the first summer blockbuster and introduced studio executives to the financial power of a summer thriller distributed in wide release.Spielberg said he got the directing job by pitching the producers on the idea that “‘Jaws’ was ‘Duel’ on the water.”“‘I can do the shark like the truck, I swear.’ That’s exactly what I said … and they hired me.”Spielberg said he relates to the clip, in which a shark kills a boy, much differently today as a father than he did as a budding filmmaker looking to move the story along. “What really pains me is when the mom comes down [to the shore], and she can’t find her son. … Now I look at that, and it has an entirely different meaning to me.”But when he created that scene, he recalled, careful preparation was critical.“What I think is essential for filmmakers to really learn how to do … is to see the scene first in their head, figure it out almost mathematically, and then go out and shoot it.”The Ohio native’s interest in films came by way of his childhood love of crashing his electric toy trains together, he told Bhabha. “I had grown accustomed to the destruction … I couldn’t live without it.” When his father threatened to take the trains away if he continued to break them, Spielberg grabbed his father’s eight-millimeter Kodak movie camera and captured a crash on film instead.He never broke his toys trains again.“I watched that crash over and over and over again, and it sated me enough. And that was really the first movie I ever made.”He called his 1982 science-fiction film “E.T.,” about an alien left behind on Earth and his friendship with a lonely young boy, his “first truly personal film,” explaining how he combined a story about his parents’ divorce with the idea of an abandoned creature. The extraterrestrial was inspired by Spielberg’s prior work on the 1977 science fiction hit “Close Encounters of the Third Kind,” by his boyhood fascination with the stars, and by his belief that “there’s no possible mathematical way that we ever could be alone in the universe.”At its core, Spielberg added, “E.T.” is a story of repair.“I also thought that if you could learn to love something that looks like [E.T.], then that opens your empathic pathways in all directions, including healing and repairing the damage done in a divorce.”Family, empathy, and reconciliation became familiar themes in his work, and he often offered audiences a resolution at the end of his films. For him, the period 1933 to 1959 constitutes the golden era of films, since most movies made then involve “stories that completely resolve themselves.”“I am a guilty party to wanting to complete the sentence by the end of the picture. The audience has made an investment, and I usually try to find some way to put a period on it.”Children are often key players in his films because they offer the audience an “unfiltered, genuine” perspective.His topical films, such as “Lincoln,” “Munich,” and “Saving Private Ryan,” developed out of his passion for history, instilled in him by his father, a World War II veteran who hosted reunions with other veterans in the Spielberg living room.“I got to hear stories about freedom and stories about sacrifice. … All of this … led me to a love of history, and I just became fascinated with it, all those values.”Asked by Bhabha what will happen to filmmaking when the “public audiences for cinema diminish” as viewers gravitate to newer technologies, Spielberg was optimistic, insisting that there will always be a place for movies “in some form or another as a public communion.”“There may be a different technology, but we are always going to come together to have the experience. I can’t imagine any time in the near or distant future where people are going to want to be entertained or informed by themselves or with just one or two people around. We’re a society that needs company.”Offering hope to young directors in the audience Spielberg said he frequently finds new talent via the Internet, which he called “a huge theater to audition who you are and what you have to say about yourself in the world.”He also said he ignores technique in favor of storytelling, searching instead for “people who are saying something to us that we don’t hear every day.”“I don’t look for craft anymore. I am not looking for where the camera goes, what the lighting looks like. I am looking for a new idea when I look for a new young filmmaker.”last_img read more

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Credit union RBC2 engagement, analysis key in coming weeks: Nussle

first_imgWith the release of the National Credit Union Administration’s revised risk-based capital proposal (RBC2), credit unions should be prepared to analyze the proposal and engage in the regulatory process, says Credit Union National Association President/CEO Jim Nussle. The CUNA leader sent a letter to members of the U.S. Senate and House Friday with information about the proposal, as well CUNA’s stance on the revised plan.“We need to continue our engagement and continue taking a very careful look at what’s in the rule. We want to know how the different parts of the proposal will impact the entire credit union community,” Nussle said. “The devil is very clearly in the details, and those details are things credit union stakeholders will understand much more acutely as those involved in the day-to-day operations of your institutions. So we need to hear how it impacts you.”NCUA Chair Debbie Matz, Vice Chair Rick Metsger and board member J. Mark McWatters all cited the 2,056 comment letters received on the initial proposal as a major impetus behind many of the changes. In addition, a major part of the agency’s 500-page RBC2 plan takes up many CUNA concerns and comments.See the below video to hear Nussle’s thoughts on how credit unions can help shape RBC2 going forward by engaging and analyzing the proposal. continue reading » 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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