5 Myths You Need to Know About Hybrid Cloud

first_imgHybrid cloud offers the best of both worlds. It combines the benefits of public cloud – agility and low costs – with the control, performance and security of a private cloud. This has huge potential to help businesses, but many still struggle to understand what a true hybrid cloud really is.To help, I’ve debunked the top five myths surrounding hybrid clouds.Myth 1: Private + Public = HybridSimply having both cloud infrastructures in place does not give you a true hybrid cloud. In fact, you could end up having the benefits of neither and the risks of both. When moving secure data to the public cloud it’s easy to go against data protection laws and the migration of apps from public to private clouds can lead to unexpected costs. Having a true hybrid cloud means controlling your workloads, storage and network resources in a way that limits risk and increases productivity.Myth 2: Hybrid Clouds are Complex and Hard to BuildUtilising fully engineered solutions reduces complexity and enables choice – choice in the technology upon which the hybrid cloud is standardised – VMware, Microsoft, OpenStack – and choice in the public clouds companies’ on premise private clouds can interoperate with. An engineered solution speeds three critical elements of development: 1) end-to-end integration and testing to ensure all components work together, 2) use of converged infrastructure to dramatically simplify the delivery and deployment, and 3) pre-defined blueprints for services with workflows to automate provisioning through a self-service portal.Myth 3: Public Cloud is the Most Cost-Effective Option Once you have taken into consideration governance, risk and compliance concerns, a hybrid cloud model actually has a lower total cost of ownership. It’s easy to violate local or global data protection regulation when placing data or workloads in the public cloud. Laws and local requirements vary across markets, and some are so complex that businesses avoid the public cloud all together. Therefore you may want to choose a private cloud for more sensitive workloads. In Germany for example the rules are particularly strict when it comes to how data is stored and processed. The key lies in your public and private cloud working in harmony, delivering the advantages of each to the workloads that need them the most.Myth 4: You Lose All Control of Data in the CloudWhile some aggressive cloud players can make it hard to extract or migrate your data, a properly orchestrated hybrid cloud environment allows you to retain control. A well-run hybrid cloud can rapidly deliver public and private resources, providing control and visibility to IT departments and the on-demand self-service that developers and application users expect.Myth 5: It’s Hard to Determine which Applications are Right for Cloud Organisations are often hindered by complex IT infrastructure interdependencies, as well as an incomplete inventory of their IT assets and their relationships to business applications. With just a spreadsheet and no disciplined methodology, it can be nearly impossible to accurately assess application suitability, much less placement in the correct cloud architecture. Experts who use automated platforms for data collection and analysis can provide a comprehensive view of the application portfolio and determine whether you should migrate, consolidate, modernize, or sunset applications.I hope this has helped clear up some aspects of hybrid cloud that are frequently misunderstood. The opportunity is just too great to ignore. So are you ready to make the most of what hybrid cloud has to offer?Tweet me @dinkoerorlast_img read more

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Labour’s goal of a safer society doomed to fail

first_imgKiwiBlog 24 February 2018Family First Comment: Excellent commentary by ex-ACT MP David Garratt….“The first thing Labour needs to change is the common leftie perception that most prisoners are hapless boys who have had  one lamentable lapse – a sudden mad or drugged urge to commit an aggravated robbery perhaps. The reality is very different. The average prisoner has 46 convictions – yes you read that right – forty six , and has served the gamut of non-custodial sentences before finally being incarcerated. Of the 5% who have less than five convictions, they will invariably be in prison for murder or a very serious assault….”“….In my view there are  only two ways to achieve the safer society that Little says he wants. First and best would be to stop pretending that every form of  whanau is equal, and admit  that a stable two parent family is best for society. To acknowledge that there is in fact a universal moral code to which all civil societies subscribe – the ten commandments contain the main elements of it: not stealing from ones fellows; not bashing or killing them; recognizing that  parents are in a better position than some 14 year old punk to decide what is and isn’t  good  for that young person. Sadly, despite the efforts of groups like Family First, such a change is most unlikely.”Andrew Little has said  he is utterly committed to creating a safer New Zealand – a laudable  goal, but one which he simply cannot achieve given Labour’s present assumptions about offending and penal policy. His colleague Kelvin Davis wants to  reduce the prison population by 30% – impossible unless we release those convicted of violent offences. Some leftie claimed  on National Radio the other day that the jails are “full of people convicted of cannabis offences”. This is a myth.  In fact, only 12% of the prison population are there for drug offences, the vast majority of them for manufacturing, distributing  or importing P. None  are in jail for possession of cannabis.The first thing Labour needs to change is the common leftie perception that most prisoners are hapless boys who have had  one lamentable lapse – a sudden mad or drugged urge to commit an aggravated robbery perhaps. The reality is very different. The average prisoner has 46 convictions – yes you read that right – forty six , and has served the gamut of non-custodial sentences before finally being incarcerated. Of the 5% who have less than five convictions, they will invariably be in prison for murder or a very serious assault.Do-gooders like Workman like to mock people like me by suggesting that we have an unreasoning and irrational  fear of a mythical  “Other”; that those in jail are really pretty much ordinary people, just like the rest of us. While this picture may have been at least partly true 50 years ago, it is emphatically not so today. By and large, prison inmates are  fundamentally different from the rest of us. They are people who  have not only utterly  rejected, but laugh at the principles by which most of the rest of us try to live: not to steal from or beat up our fellows; not to take advantage of the weak; to try and help the vulnerable, or at least not to do them further harm. They are indeed “The Other”, and we justifiably fear them.How did we get here?  By two main routes in my view: firstly by abandoning the idea of a universal moral code to which all decent members of society should subscribe, evidenced by the decline both  of organized religion, and the  ideal of service above self.  All the members of Bomber Command in WW II – of whom 30% never returned – were volunteers. Does anyone really imagine that would happen today?We declared two generations ago that the “ordinary” nuclear family of Mum Dad and the kids was no better than any other family – or whanau, as it is now. We declared that society had no business criticising a solo mum with five kids to three different fathers – a whanau that may have utterly different values to the mainstream. And we have reaped the consequences of that foolishness.READ MORE: https://www.kiwiblog.co.nz/2018/02/guest_post_labours_goal_of_a_safer_society_doomed_to_fail_unless_there_is_a_radical_re-think.htmlKeep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more

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Tickets for Mallorca-Barcelona on the 14th in Son Moix are already on sale

first_imgFor unpaid adults prices range from 80 to 290 euros.Subscribers may purchase two tickets between 70 and 280 euros. The tickets for the match between Mallorca and Barcelona to be played in Son Moix on March 14 at 6:30 p.m., are on sale from this Tuesday day 3 at the ticket offices of the Vermilion Stadium.These lockers They will be open from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. and from 3:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. between Tuesday and Thursday, while On Friday the schedule will be from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m..last_img

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