Culbreath, Scherm Honored

first_imgTwo prominent faculty members of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Albert Culbreath and Harald Scherm, have been named 2020 Fellows of the American Phytopathological Society (APS).The society grants this honor to a current APS member in recognition of distinguished contributions to plant pathology or to APS. Recognition as a Fellow is based on significant contributions in original research, teaching, administration, professional and public service, and/or extension and outreach.​“Being named a Fellow is a scientific society’s greatest honor,” said Sam Pardue, dean and director of CAES. “We are proud of Drs. Culbreath and Scherm for this outstanding recognition. It not only speaks of the excellence of their individual programs, but to the quality of the plant pathology department at UGA as well.”Albert K. Culbreath is a professor of plant pathology at the University of Georgia Tifton campus. He is recognized as a leader in the ecology, epidemiology and control of thrips-vectored tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), and of early and late leaf-spot diseases of peanut.He is an author on more than 200 journal articles and book chapters, and co-developer of five TSWV-resistant peanut cultivars.Culbreath was a co-developer of the “Tomato Spotted Wilt Risk Index” and “Peanut Rx” educational tools that ensured economic viability of peanut production when the disease threatened the industry’s existence in the 1990s. He has been an integral part of a multidisciplinary team approach to this complex problem that has produced an integrated spotted-wilt management program combining multiple suppressive factors to control the disease. Adoption of the integrated system coincided with dramatic decline in annual losses to TSWV in peanut.As a part of this work, he documented slower epidemic development in several cultivars and breeding lines than in ‘Florunner’, the predominant peanut cultivar grown in the U.S. until the early 1990s. Culbreath has characterized the field reaction to TSWV of numerous breeding lines from multiple peanut breeders. Several of those have been released as cultivars.Much of his work on integrating resistant or tolerant cultivars with suppressive cultural practices is applicable to both organic and conventional production in developing and developed countries.Most recently, Culbreath reported synergistic effects of elemental sulfur with sterol biosynthesis inhibiting (SBI) fungicides for control of late leaf spot in fields where the SBI fungicides alone provided little control. He and UGA colleague Katherine Stevenson co-authored the chapter on fungicide resistance in peanut pathogens in the recent second edition of “Fungicide Resistance in North America.” Culbreath has served as president, councilor and division forum representative of the APS Southern Division. He is a Fellow of the American Peanut Research and Education Society, and he was previously recognized with the APS Novartis Award, the UGA D.W. Brooks Award for Excellence in Research and the APS Southern Division Outstanding Plant Pathologist Award.He has also served on 41 graduate student committees and been the major professor for seven master’s degree students and four doctoral candidates. He teaches “Introductory Plant Pathology” at UGA-Tifton.Harald Scherm is department head and professor in the UGA Department of Plant Pathology. He is recognized for his pioneering research on pathogen biology, epidemiology and disease management in fruit crops, especially blueberry. He has had a career-long fascination with understanding and managing diseases with unorthodox life histories, such as mummy berry, Exobasidium leaf and fruit spot, and orange cane blotch.Scherm, who joined the UGA Department of Plant Pathology in 1996, is known for his early research on mummy berry, which elucidated the epidemiology of the disease on southern blueberries, developed a mummy-germination model to anticipate primary infection, and implemented improved fungicide schedules aligned with host and pathogen phenology. This work formed the basis for Scherm’s recognition with the Lee M. Hutchins Award in 2003 and the Julius-Kühn Prize in 2004. Subsequent research on this pathosystem shifted to host-pathogen interactions during the flower infection process and culminated in the publication of an article in the Annual Review of Phytopathologyin 2006.Scherm served as the assistant dean for research in CAES between 2010 and 2017 and has been head of the Department of Plant Pathology since July 2016. Under his leadership, the department added 11 new faculty members and the number of graduate students has reached an all-time high of 53, as of fall 2019. The UGA Department of Plant Pathology is recognized internationally for its comprehensive and integrative research and outreach portfolio, spanning basic, translational and applied programs.Scherm has authored 198 publications, trained 22 graduate students, and received UGA’s Excellence in Graduate Mentoring Award. Most recently, he took the lead in establishing UGA’s interdisciplinary graduate certificate program in Agricultural Data Science, for which he currently serves as the coordinator.He served APS on numerous committees, on the editorial boards of Phytopathology and Plant Disease, and is currently providing leadership for Phytopathology as the journal’s editor-in-chief.“This is a well-deserved honor for two outstanding scientists and earned recognition of the international-quality science that emanates from the UGA plant pathology department,” said Allen Moore, CAES associate dean of research. “It is especially gratifying to see scientists from both our foundational and applied research areas recognized at this exceptional level, demonstrating the balanced strength of UGA agricultural research.”last_img read more

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USG senate votes to amend all future USCards

first_imgKatie Chin | Daily TrojanThe Undergraduate Student Government passed a proposal Tuesday night to modify the phone numbers printed on the back of USCards for future USC students at the USG Senate meeting. By virtue of an amendment proposed by Speaker Pro Tempore Tyler Matheson, the amendment, which passed 9-3, includes three numbers: the Department of Public Safety emergency number, the Crisis Intervention Center and the USC 4-1-1 hotline.Currently, USCards have two phone numbers: Undergraduate Student Government and an inoperational emergency line. USG said its intent behind the proposal was to use the space to provide much-needed guidance to students in need of urgent assistance.The Crisis Intervention Center number and the USC 4-1-1 hotline are both still in the making and not currently functional, which caused many senators to ask questions and express concerns before voting on the amendment.The Senate discussed the USC 4-1-1 hotline at length, as it was not yet known if the hotline would be automated or answered by human responders. Sens. Isabella Smith and Noah Silver asserted that this contingency could sway their opinions regarding the amendment from two numbers to three numbers. “If [USC 4-1-1] was an automated number, I would rather have all three of them on there,” Smith said. This turned out to be the broader opinion of the Senate, and the amendment and proposal were both passed with the understanding that the 4-1-1 hotline will be an automated number.Dunn said that the USC 4-1-1 hotline and the Crisis Intervention number could be sources of confusion, because they will cover a variety of topics and concerns.Sen. Buck Andrews brought up the distinction between physical and mental emergencies, and how it may be unclear as to which number students should call in each case. Dunn acknowledged the potential issue of differentiating between the two.“That’s my only concern,” Dunn said. “I just don’t know if all of our students are going to know that Crisis Prevention means mental; DPS Emergency means physical.”last_img read more

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Premier League Player Enters Guinness World Records Book

first_imgRelatedTransfer: Eagles Star Musa Set For CSKA Moscow Loan Move; Medical To Hold In LondonJanuary 29, 2018In “National Team”BunuelJune 30, 2017Similar post2017/2018 Premier League: Who Makes The Top Four?August 11, 2017In “England” Stoke City striker Peter Crouch has made the 2018 Guinness World Records book for scoring the most headed goals in the English Premier League (EPL).The 36-year old has scored 51 out of his 105 EPL goals via head and that’s five more than the 46 headed goals managed by EPL record goalscorer Alan Shearer.Speaking on his achievement, Crouch said:“If you are a centre-forward, you should be in the box, ready for the ball.”“That is the way I have always played my game and that will never change. I see centre-forwards hanging around outside the box and it blows my mind, I just can’t get my head around it.” he added.last_img read more

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