Partnerships Continue with New SOUTHCOM Commander

first_img Diálogo: You already chaired the Caribbean Nations Security Conference (CANSEC) in December 2012, one of the three major SOUTHCOM events. What are your expectations for the Central America Security Conference (CENTSEC) and the South America Defense Chiefs Conference (SOUTHDEC), the other two main conferences? Unfortunately that’s one of the things that will suffer. This is not to say that we are not going to walk away from disaster relief. If, God forbid, a volcano or a terrible hurricane happens, the United States will be there, but for sure not as quickly. It will take a longer period of time to help in the recovery, but we are still there for all our partners and friends, not just the ones that we are most friendly with. We are all human beings, we are all in this together, and helping each other out is the best form of partnership. I don’t care what country it is. If there is a humanitarian disaster, regardless of what country it is, SOUTHCOM will be there to help relieve that problem for those people. Gen. Kelly: Hopefully we are going to save most of them. We are doing a lot of searching right now for internal efficiencies. If what we do here is engagement, partnerships, and counter drug activities, everything else has to be looked at as a potential cut. Many of our exercises are not real big; we are not sending brigades, we are sending four or five guys, sometimes 12 for a month or two to work with the partner nation military. It is not a huge investment. Unfortunately, there are some countries in this part of the world that we are not on the best terms with at the moment. We all hope that will change. My greatest hope is that those countries will someday, during my tour here, be more accepting so we can develop a better and friendlier partnership with them, on their terms. Interview with U.S. Marine Corps General John F. Kelly, SOUTHCOM Commander U.S. Marine Corps General John F. Kelly: Since I have been here at SOUTHCOM, I have visited Colombia, Peru, Chile, Brazil, Honduras, El Salvador, Jamaica, Haiti, Trinidad & Tobago, and tomorrow I will head down to Panama and then Guatemala. I have hit a lot of places, I guess. Before that, when I worked with U.S. Secretary of Defense [Leon] Panetta, I made trips to Latin America. I have been to Peru, now a couple of times, Chile a couple of times, Colombia a couple of times, Brazil a couple of times, Uruguay, once. My impressions of the countries I have visited are that they want to have a relationship with the United States, and the United States wants to have a partnership with virtually everybody in the Caribbean, and Central and South America. I had three tours in Iraq, just about a year each and, in one case, longer than a year. Diálogo: Before your last assignment as Senior Military Assistant to U.S. Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta, you were deployed to Iraq, so you are no stranger to different cultures and different languages. From your experience, what is the importance of understanding the culture and language of the countries in our region? Diálogo: What is your most important message for the senior military leaders in the region? By Dialogo February 27, 2013 If that happens…[it would be] good. And I hope it happens before I leave, because there are some common challenges regardless of what country you are in the world. The obvious one is drugs and the illegal money from profits generated by drugs. It doesn’t matter if you are a Central American country desperately trying to fight this fight or if you are Colombia, that is emerging from a tough time and doing so well; it doesn’t matter if you are Venezuela; it doesn’t matter if you are Bolivia, Ecuador or Chile. The poison that is drugs and the money it generates is everybody’s concern, and it is in everyone’s interest to try to stem the tide of this cancer. You would be surprised at the great work countries are doing shoulder to shoulder with us down in Key West, trying to deal with this terrible problem of drugs. Diálogo: General Kelly, after visiting a few countries in the Caribbean, Central and South America, what’s your assessment of the region? When I say partnership, I don’t mean a dominant partnership, I mean a partnership. center_img A lot of times conferences are looked at as things you can do without, but conferences are hugely important to SOUTHCOM because they bring the partners together even if it is for a couple of days to talk about countering drugs, humanitarian and disaster relief, which is huge down here. The good news about this area of the world is that, for the most part, people are not throwing rocks at each other; they are talking to each other. For the most part, people are getting along; they are trading with each other. This part of the world is not as dangerous. Yes, Colombia is still dealing with a tough fight; the Peruvians have a fight on their hands with Sendero Luminoso [Shining Path], but for the most part people here are getting along with each other, and the United States just wants to be part of that. Diálogo: Given the budget cuts proposed by the U.S. Department of Defense, what’s the future of key U.S. Southern Command military exercises such as PANAMAX? Gen. Kelly: They are absolutely invaluable to us. We have several partner nation liaison officers here. In fact, we just said goodbye to Brazilian Marine [Commander Alexandre Silva] who is going back to his country to take command of a battalion. His replacement is already here. The afternoon General John F. Kelly took charge of SOUTHCOM, the red U.S. Marine Corps flag – his branch flag – flew over the Command headquarters, along with those of partner nations in the Caribbean, Central and South America. Since that day, in November 2012, the four-star general, who commanded troops in Iraq and worked shoulder to shoulder with U.S. Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta, has traveled extensively to Latin America, getting to know the region’s senior military and defense leaders and their perspectives. Hours before heading south again – to the Central American isthmus this time –, Gen. Kelly shared with Diálogo some of his thoughts on the region, and on the importance of strengthening partnerships against what he calls “the common poison of drugs.” They are invaluable individuals for us to understand each other and get along. And in our organization in Key West, Joint Interagency Task Force – South, we also have a very large number of liaison officers from various countries. Diálogo: And in that goal of promoting understanding among countries in the region, how do you value the importance of the partner nations’ liaison officers at SOUTHCOM? Years ago we had a different relationship with this part of the world, but now it has matured. Take Brazil [for example,] that is now a world power, economic as well as military, in the right way military. You have Colombia, a tremendous success story. Twenty years ago, 15 years ago, most people in the United States, certainly in Washington, would not have given much hope at all to Colombia. People say “You can’t win the drug war”, and I would say “Look at Colombia!” People say, “You can’t win the war against drugs”, and I say, “Look at Peru and what they are trying to do!” A lot of people would say, “You can’t win the drug war”, but look at what our friends the Guatemalans, the Hondurans, the Salvadorans, the Belizeans are trying to do in the Northern Tier. They want a partnership with the United States on their terms, and the United States wants to partner with them on their terms. Obviously, we have a tremendous trading relationship with this part of the world, and we have attained a relationship of quality that has already emerged. Gen. Kelly: That’s our bread and butter: bringing people together in conferences, in tabletop exercises or exercises. The relationships you develop are at least as important or probably more important than the actual thing that you are doing. I operated around the world in my time as a Marine and the one truism I found is that personal relations count probably more than anything. People tell me that in Latin America personal relationships are important, but it is no different in the Middle East. As different as they are, to know the Sheik, to know the clan leader, to look in his eyes and work through a problem with him and develop a personal relationship, so that when there is a problem you pick up the phone and there is trust there. I have been in Asia, South America now and certainly the Middle East and Europe in my almost 40 years as a Marine, and the one constant is that personal relations count. That means getting out to see people. If they come here the door is always open, whether it is a general, an admiral or an ambassador. And when I go there the doors have always been open, with the exception of a couple of countries, but I hope someday to visit those countries and to develop a relationship with those leaders and their countries. In the meantime, I am happy to just make a commitment that if anything happens in those countries and they want us to help, we will be there to help. Gen. Kelly: The United States is much closer in terms of culture to this part of the world. Whether you speak Spanish or Portuguese or not, in the United States we have millions and millions of people who have arrived from countries in the Caribbean, Central and South America. In comparison to the Middle East, this is easy, and frankly refreshing. For the last ten years of my life, like most people in the United States Military, but particularly Marines and U.S. Army Soldiers, our lives have been dominated by the war. Gen. Kelly: We are with you. We are shoulder to shoulder with you. We are friends. Yes, we have budget issues, but the good news is that all the countries we deal with today in this part of the world – this isn’t the case in a lot of the world – want to do it themselves. They want a partnership of equals, and I think that is hugely important. Although the United States is dealing with pretty significant budget problems, we will get beyond this. In the meantime, my commitment is to work as close as I can, as often as I can, with as many countries in our region for all the things of mutual importance: counterdrug, humanitarian, medical… Some countries are facing tough challenges, Central American countries in particular, but my advice is to look at Colombia, look at what Peru is doing, and know that we are with you. That’s my message.last_img read more

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Road crash kills 2

first_imgBACOLOD City – The motorcycle they were riding crashed against atricycle in Burgos Extension, Barangay Estefania. Amihan, meanwhile, was rushed to the Corazon Locsin MontelibanoMemorial Regional Hospital here where he was declared “dead on arrival.” According to police investigators, Amihan was driving a motorcycle withthe unidentified back rider when they hit a car around 2:05 a.m. on March 1. The 25-year-old driver Jolyn Amihan of Barangay Nabitasan, La Paz,Iloilo City and an unidentified person sustained fatal body injuries, a policereport showed. The unidentified person died on the spot, police added. Pediongola, on the other hand, was detained in the custodial facilityof Police Station 4, while the driver of the car has yet to be identified as ofthis writing./PN They fled and later then crashed against a tricycle driven by37-year-old Roland Pediongola of Barangay Granada, police said.last_img read more

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Broncos top draft pick Jeudy makes great first impression

first_imgAlso back was cornerback Bryce Callahan, who missed last year with a foot injury.“Callahan had a good day today. It’s good to see him out there moving around. His foot feels fine. He’s confident and ready to go.” HERE IN SPIRITBecause of the COVID-19 pandemic, Broncos mainstay Fred Flemming, the team’s 77-year-old director of special services, wasn’t on hand at training camp. But his likeness was.The Broncos put a life-size cardboard cutout of Flemming on the grassy knoll overlooking the football fields. You could almost hear him yelling at you to take a couple of steps back. Broncos top draft pick Jeudy makes great first impression Associated Press Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditENGLEWOOD, Colo. (AP) — Rookie receiver Jerry Jeudy went right to work dropping jaws Friday when the Denver Broncos gathered for their first full practice of 2020 under smoky skies from wildfires burning in the Rocky Mountains.General manager John Elway, who spent his offseason buttressing Denver’s offense, sat on the sideline smiling every time his top draft pick plucked another pass out of the haze, especially the one he cradled in the back of the end zone.“I think he did some great things today, he ran some hella routes,” safety and fellow Alabama alum Kareem Jackson said. “He’s that type of player. I’ve had a chance to watch him since he was a freshman, obviously with him going to my alma mater, that’s one of the teams I watch every Saturday. So … now having him as a teammate it’s exciting.” Notes: C Austin Schlottmann and RT Jake Rodgers “are in the hunt, both for starting jobs and making the team,” Fangio said. … Teams weren’t allowed to bring in free agents until a few days ago, so 12th-year tackle Demar Dotson is way behind in the playbook. “Certainly he has the license and the permit to win a starting job if he can. But that remains to be seen. It’s going to take us a little while here to find out where he’s at.” ___ Follow Arnie Melendrez Stapleton on Twitter: http://twitter.com/arniestapleton___More AP NFL: https://apnews.com/NFL and https://twitter.com/AP_NFL “He’s got good polish as a receiver … He runs good routes, he’s got a good change of direction, good hands,” Fangio said. “And it was nice to see him make a couple of plays today.” Jeudy gives second-year quarterback Drew Lock another top-flight target to team with No. 1 receiver Courtland Sutton and last year’s first-round draft pick, tight end Noah Fant, in an offense being designed by former Giants head coach Pat Shurmur.With coronavirus protocols, the league isn’t allowing fans to attend training camp, so there wasn’t the usual 2,000 fans on the berm overlooking the practice fields for the first time since the Broncos held their entire 2014 training camp minus fans because of construction projects at team headquarters.“The fans are a very, very important part of pro sports and we all knew that. I knew that. But to me, it’s very obvious when you watch sporting events without the fans, you miss them,” Fangio said. “Not just because of the support, but they’re part of the action. And we miss them and can’t wait to get them back, whenever that will be.”The Broncos are still in talks with the governor’s office about hosting upwards of 20,000 fans at their games this season. NOT 100 PERCENTFor the second straight summer, tight end Austin Fort went down with a knee injury. After missing all last season, Fort “tweaked his knee in one of the earlier workouts,” Fangio said, adding he’ll be out at least a couple more weeks. Fort was the only player absent from Friday’s practice.Participating in his first practice since September was linebacker Bradley Chubb (knee). “I like where he’s at physically and mentally,” Fangio said. Jackson said Denver’s D-backs were talking all about Jeudy, considered the best pure route runner in this year’s deep class of talented rookie receivers.“He can get in and out of his breaks better than anyone I’ve ever seen before,” Jackson said. “For him to be a rookie, his tempo and his routes, the way he can change his pace, the way he sells things, it’s very rare.”Rarer still is the rookie who can garner praise from veterans who say his presence will hone their own skills. “To be able to see him on a day-to-day basis is definitely going to help us,” Jackson said. “But he’s going to pose a challenge for other defenses.”Jeudy has also made a good early impression on head coach Vic Fangio. August 14, 2020last_img read more

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