Spielberg on Spielberg

first_imgWhat do a man-eating shark and a maniacal truck driver have in common? They both helped launch Steven Spielberg’s career. During an appearance at Harvard on Tuesday, the Oscar-winning director recalled the offbeat stars of his early movies and explained the bedrock influences behind his decades of notable filmmaking.Harvard President Drew Faust introduced the session, which was sponsored by the Mahindra Humanities Center’s Rita E. Hauser Forum for the Arts, welcoming Spielberg as a fellow historian, and “as much an educator as an artist.”Center director Homi Bhabha oversaw the 90-minute conversation with the director, which included questions from the audience. Bhabha, who structured the evening around clips from Spielberg films, opened with a snippet from the 1971 TV movie “Duel,” about a motorist terrorized by the mysterious driver of a tractor-trailer truck.The film had a particular relevance because it was the first project Spielberg really “went after,” he said, and because he was “terrified of merging onto any freeway anywhere in the country.”“I didn’t relate to ‘Duel’ as something that might have happened to me, being bullied or anything when I was a child. I related to ‘Duel’ because I was terrified of trucks. And I thought ‘This is perfect. If they only give me the job, I know how to scare people because I know what scares me.’”He knew how scare people with his next movie, too. Many in the audience groaned when composer John Williams’ menacing score started during a clip from “Jaws,” the 1975 film that changed the way many beachgoers played in the surf. The film also revolutionized the movie industry. It was widely considered the first summer blockbuster and introduced studio executives to the financial power of a summer thriller distributed in wide release.Spielberg said he got the directing job by pitching the producers on the idea that “‘Jaws’ was ‘Duel’ on the water.”“‘I can do the shark like the truck, I swear.’ That’s exactly what I said … and they hired me.”Spielberg said he relates to the clip, in which a shark kills a boy, much differently today as a father than he did as a budding filmmaker looking to move the story along. “What really pains me is when the mom comes down [to the shore], and she can’t find her son. … Now I look at that, and it has an entirely different meaning to me.”But when he created that scene, he recalled, careful preparation was critical.“What I think is essential for filmmakers to really learn how to do … is to see the scene first in their head, figure it out almost mathematically, and then go out and shoot it.”The Ohio native’s interest in films came by way of his childhood love of crashing his electric toy trains together, he told Bhabha. “I had grown accustomed to the destruction … I couldn’t live without it.” When his father threatened to take the trains away if he continued to break them, Spielberg grabbed his father’s eight-millimeter Kodak movie camera and captured a crash on film instead.He never broke his toys trains again.“I watched that crash over and over and over again, and it sated me enough. And that was really the first movie I ever made.”He called his 1982 science-fiction film “E.T.,” about an alien left behind on Earth and his friendship with a lonely young boy, his “first truly personal film,” explaining how he combined a story about his parents’ divorce with the idea of an abandoned creature. The extraterrestrial was inspired by Spielberg’s prior work on the 1977 science fiction hit “Close Encounters of the Third Kind,” by his boyhood fascination with the stars, and by his belief that “there’s no possible mathematical way that we ever could be alone in the universe.”At its core, Spielberg added, “E.T.” is a story of repair.“I also thought that if you could learn to love something that looks like [E.T.], then that opens your empathic pathways in all directions, including healing and repairing the damage done in a divorce.”Family, empathy, and reconciliation became familiar themes in his work, and he often offered audiences a resolution at the end of his films. For him, the period 1933 to 1959 constitutes the golden era of films, since most movies made then involve “stories that completely resolve themselves.”“I am a guilty party to wanting to complete the sentence by the end of the picture. The audience has made an investment, and I usually try to find some way to put a period on it.”Children are often key players in his films because they offer the audience an “unfiltered, genuine” perspective.His topical films, such as “Lincoln,” “Munich,” and “Saving Private Ryan,” developed out of his passion for history, instilled in him by his father, a World War II veteran who hosted reunions with other veterans in the Spielberg living room.“I got to hear stories about freedom and stories about sacrifice. … All of this … led me to a love of history, and I just became fascinated with it, all those values.”Asked by Bhabha what will happen to filmmaking when the “public audiences for cinema diminish” as viewers gravitate to newer technologies, Spielberg was optimistic, insisting that there will always be a place for movies “in some form or another as a public communion.”“There may be a different technology, but we are always going to come together to have the experience. I can’t imagine any time in the near or distant future where people are going to want to be entertained or informed by themselves or with just one or two people around. We’re a society that needs company.”Offering hope to young directors in the audience Spielberg said he frequently finds new talent via the Internet, which he called “a huge theater to audition who you are and what you have to say about yourself in the world.”He also said he ignores technique in favor of storytelling, searching instead for “people who are saying something to us that we don’t hear every day.”“I don’t look for craft anymore. I am not looking for where the camera goes, what the lighting looks like. I am looking for a new idea when I look for a new young filmmaker.”last_img read more

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NAFCU to Congress: Protect small lenders, act on housing finance reform

first_img continue reading » Following Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) Director Mark Calabria’s recent announcement that the agency plans to issue a re-proposed rule setting capital requirements for the Government-Sponsored Enterprises (GSEs) Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac early next year, NAFCU’s Brad Thaler reiterated the association’s call for legislative action on housing finance reform in a letter to lawmakers.As the leading voice for credit unions with housing reform discussions, NAFCU has continuously advocated for the importance of maintaining credit unions’ unfettered access to the secondary mortgage market and has engaged with Calabria, other administration officials, and lawmakers on the issue.“NAFCU has long advocated for housing finance reform because the current conservatorship of the GSEs is unsustainable; however, certain legislative safeguards should first be adopted to preserve a level playing field for financial institutions of all sizes,” wrote Thaler, the association’s vice president of legislative affairs.In the letter, sent to members of the House Financial Services and Senate Banking Committees, Thaler urged Congress to move “swiftly” to protect the ability of small lenders, such as credit unions, to obtain liquidity through mortgage loan sales to the GSEs. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Indonesia still deserves special treatment in global trade: Economists

first_img“Our human development index [HDI] is still low. Even though there are funds worth Rp 500 trillion for education, but if we look at Indonesia’s population, those with higher education make up only [a small] percentage. The biggest [demographic] is junior high school [graduates],” Aviliani said, contrasting such conditions with developed countries that had tech-savvy human resources.In the United Nations Development Programme’s Human Development Report 2018 Indonesia ranked 111th with an HDI score of 0.707, or 96 countries ranks below the US ranked in 15th place with an HDI of 0.920.Aside from the aforementioned parameter, Aviliani explained, numerous other characteristics justified Indonesia defending its developing country status. The majority of Indonesia’s population still works in agriculture with traditional farming equipment, and high levels of unemployment were indicators of a developing country, Aviliani said.The United States Trade Representative (USTR) rolled out a new policy in February and removed several countries from the list of developing and least-developed countries, including Indonesia.The new policy outlines that a developed country is one with more than 0.5 percent of trade significance to the world and a member of international organizations such as the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) or the Group of 20 (G20).Indonesia, accounting for 0.9 percent of global exports in 2018 and being a member of the G20, is therefore no longer eligible for subsidies.Read also: Growing pains: US tariff policy overshadows planned Jokowi visitINDEF researcher Ahmad Heri Firdaus said at the same event that, with the US’ new policy, Indonesia’s exported goods would be subject to higher import taxes, which could increase the price of the goods in the international market.According to a simulation he ran with the Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP), assuming that import tax would rise to 5 percent from the current position, Indonesia’s main export products to the US would suffer a loss of up to 2.5 percent. Several commodities would be affected, for example, textile product exports would decrease by 1.56 percent and components for electric machines were projected to decrease by 1.2 percent.“We can still claim to be a developing country, [but] of course, supported by strong research,” Heri said. (ydp)Topics : “Why do we need to make a declaration? Because our GNI per capita is far lower than that of [developed] countries. Indonesia’s is only around US$3,800 per capita. Compared with the United States, the gap is very big,” INDEF economist Tauhid Ahmad said in a press conference in Jakarta on Thursday.According to the World Bank’s parameter, high-income economies are those with a GNI per capita of $12,376. Indonesia with a GNI per capita of $3,840 in 2018 is considered a lower-middle-income economy, the category for countries with a GNI per capita between $1,026 and $3,995.Read also: Revocation of Indonesia’s developing country status will not affect GSP: GovernmentINDEF senior economist Aviliani said during the press conference that, based on several social development parameters, Indonesia had more characteristics of a developing country than a developed one. Indonesia still deserves special treatment in global trade despite the United States recently taking the archipelago off its list of developing countries, local economists have said.Economists of the Institute for Development of Economics and Finance (INDEF) said that, based on its gross national income (GNI) per capita and parameters of social development, among other factors, Indonesia should still be considered a developing country.They suggested that the government defend its developing nation status, so that Indonesia would continue to benefit from the World Trade Organization’s (WTO) special differential treatment (SDT), which exempts developing countries like Indonesia from strict trade rules.last_img read more

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Pacers’ Lamb out for season with torn knee ligament, broken leg

first_img Loading… Indiana Pacers forward Jeremy Lamb needs surgery on multiple knee injuries and will miss the remainder of the NBA season, the team said Monday.Advertisement The Pacers said that Lamb suffered a torn anterior cruciate ligament, a torn meniscus and a broken bone in his left knee in the Pacers’ loss to the Toronto Raptors on Sunday.“He will undergo surgery on a date to be determined. He will be out the remainder of the season,” the Pacers said.Lamb was hurt in the first half of the game, landing awkwardly after he was fouled while driving to the basket.Lamb, who clung to the rim of the basket before coming down, stayed on the floor for several moments but got up and made his free throws before exiting the game.Pacers’ Lamb out for season with torn knee ligament, broken leg https://t.co/WSFzI09AIc#FastbreakNews#JeremyLamb @[email protected] pic.twitter.com/7jvI9CneNC— fastbreak (@FastBreakPHNews) February 25, 2020Read Also: Beyonce kicks off LA memorial for Kobe Bryant, daughterAlthough he needed help walking in the locker room after the contest, he didn’t immediately realize the severity of the injury.“It’s sore and swelling,” he said.Lamb, 27, averaged 12.5 points with 4.3 rebounds in 46 games this season with the Pacers.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 center_img Promoted Content6 Extreme Facts About Hurricanes40 Child Actors Who Turned Into Gorgeous AdultsThe Funniest Prankster Grandma And Her Grandson9 Facts You Should Know Before Getting A Tattoo10 Extremely Dirty Seas In The WorldThis Happy Shiba Inu Pics Will Overwhelm You With CutenessEver Thought Of Sleeping Next To Celebs? This Guy Will Show YouThe Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read MoreWho’s The Best Car Manufacturer Of All Time?7 Of The Wealthiest Universities In The World14 Hilarious Comics Made By Women You Need To Follow Right Now10 Hyper-Realistic 3D Street Art By Odeithlast_img read more

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