Bakery in Armagh set to close with loss of 70 jobs

first_imgHealth foods supplier Linwoods is planning to close its bakery in Armagh.The family business said long-term decline in market demand had severely reduced its bakery margins, and that it planned to close the operation in October. The bakery produces goods including bread, baps, pancakes, potato bread, sliced wheaten, sodas and fruit loaves. As a result, the workforce at Linwoods’ Monaghan Road headquarters will be reduced by around 70 full-time employees. The Linwoods Health Foods business will not be affected.“This is a sad day for the company as we let go of one of the cornerstones of our business, which has been integral to building the Linwoods brand,” said Linwoods joint managing director John Woods.“Our bakery team has worked incredibly hard and we have explored all possible options to avoid these job losses. This decision has not been taken lightly. It follows several efforts to find alternative solutions.”Established 60 years ago as a grocery shop, Linwoods expanded into bakery and dairy and, in 2002, diversified into health foods such as nut and seed-based products. It now exports its health food lines across the UK and Europe.“Our health food business is growing and continues to be successful around the world. We are poised to grow this side of Linwoods and we are optimistic about what we can achieve in the years to come,” said Woods.The company said its priority was to now secure as many jobs as it could for the future and provide support for those impacted by this announcement. It hoped that five or more employees could be transferred to the health food business.last_img read more

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Analyzing rainfall

first_imgBy Sharon OmahenUniversity of GeorgiaJerry Walker thinks Georgia does a great job controllingemissions. And he should know. Twenty-five years ago he set up amonitoring site that analyzes chemicals in the state’s rainfallthat contribute to acidic rain.Now an emeritus professor with the University of Georgia, Walkerset up the first long-term wet-deposition monitoring site inGeorgia in 1978. The site was at a UGA College of Agriculturaland Environmental Sciences farm in Pike County.Now one of six in Georgia, the site is part of a 250-site networkrun by the National Atmospheric Deposition Program. Many sourcesfund the NADP, including state agricultural experiment stations,universities, industries and federal agencies.Analyzing the nation’s rainThe sites collect rain and snow samples across the nation.Scientists analyze them weekly for their chemical makeup. Thelower a substance’s pH, the more acidic it is.”By measuring and analyzing the rain, we can determine itslong-term effects on agricultural crops, forest and theenvironment,” Walker said. “The monitoring system allows us totrack the chemistry of storms and evaluate potential impacts ofnew sources of emissions.”John Melin, an engineering program specialist, has collected therain samples at the UGA site from the beginning. Every Tuesdaymorning, Melin and site operators across the nation collect,weigh and measure the pH of samples from their sites. Then theymail a subsample to the national office in Champaign, Ill., forfurther analysis.”Acid rain was a big concern in the 1970s,” Walker said. “But youhave to realize that normal rain has a pH level of 5.6, so it’salways a little on the acidic side. That’s because the carbondioxide in the air creates carbonic acid, which dissolves intothe rain.”Levels vary from state to statePure water has a pH of 7.0. In 2000, the most acidic rain in theUnited States had a pH of 4.3, according to the U.S.Environmental Protection Agency.In 2001, southwestern Ohio’s pH was 4.4. The Pike County, Ga., site’s pH was 4.8, Walker said. “It’s really hard to compare pHlevels, as they vary. It could be 4.3 in Pennsylvania and 5.5 inCalifornia.”Acid rain is worse in the Northeast and Midwest than in Georgia,he said.”That’s because of the emission of gases from the power plants… burning coal for fuel,” he said. “This creates a lot ofsulfur dioxide, which leads to sulfuric acid in the rain.”Scientists have confirmed that sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxidesare the main causes of acid rain. The EPA reports that two-thirdsof all sulfur dioxide and one-fourth of all nitrogen oxides inthe United States come from electric power generation.In Georgia, an estimated 26.7 percent of the sulfur emitted byutility units is returned through precipitation, Walker said.Plants benefit from the sulfur”Scientists have long recognized the importance of this elementto plant growth,” he said. “In some locations, sulfur is added todeficient soils.”Walker said he’s pleased with his 25 years of monitoringprecipitation in Georgia. “Our state panned out a lot better thanI thought it would in the beginning,” he said.”But that’s because we’ve made changes,” he said. “We’ve addedcontrols to our smoke stacks and decreased our auto emissions.Georgia’s a lot better off than some other states. So it’s notall doomsday like you often hear.”The goal of the national program is to pinpoint problems andrecord long-range trends.”The program’s data shows that, in general, things are better nowthan they were when the monitoring program was first started,”Walker said.To view the program’s findings, visit the NADP Web site(nadp.sws.uiuc.edu).last_img read more

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Partridge blasts ignorant agents

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Texas topples Troy in Rose Bowl

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECoach Doc Rivers a “fan” from way back of Jazz’s Jordan Clarkson 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! PASADENA, Calif. (AP) – Vince Young and Texas are second no more to Southern California and its Heisman Trophy twins, Reggie Bush and Matt Leinart. With the national championship down to a final play, Young scrambled for an 8-yard touchdown on fourth down with 19 seconds left and the No. 2 Longhorns stunned the top-ranked Trojans 41-38 in the Rose Bowl on Wednesday night. The high-scoring game everyone expected to see broke out in the second half _ yet it was a defensive stop that was the key for Texas. The Longhorns stuffed LenDale White on a fourth-and-2 at midfield with 2:09 left, giving them a final chance. Young, bitterly disappointed at losing the Heisman to Bush, wound up with the ultimate revenge. On a night when he ran for 200 yards and passed for 267 more, he capped a performance that Texas fans will remember forever by scoring the final TD and running for a 2-point conversion. “It’s so beautiful,” Young said as he received the MVP crystal. “Don’t you think that’s beautiful? It’s coming home all the way to Austin, Texas.” With the two highest scoring teams in the country, many figured it would come down to which team had the ball last. Almost. Trying for its unprecedented third straight title, USC crossed midfield one more time. But on the last play of the game, Leinart’s pass sailed high over Dwayne Jarrett’s head around the 25 and USC’s 34-game winning streak was over. Texas players streamed onto the field with the Longhorns’ first outright national title since 1969. Young stood on the sideline in a sea of falling confetti, arms raised toward the crowd, and senior tackle William Winston unfurled a big, white Longhorns flag. The Longhorns (13-0) won their 20th in a row, overcoming the 38-26 lead USC (12-1) held with 4 1/2 minutes left. USC players looked startled. Some put their hands to their heads, others took off their helmets. “Well, we couldn’t stop them when we had to,” USC coach Pete Carroll said. “The quarterback ran all over the place. “This is their night,” he said. “It’s wonderful doing what we’ve been doing. We didn’t get it done.” Said Leinart: “I still think we’re a better football team, they just made the plays in the end.” last_img read more

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