Billionaire Bob Ell sells Noosa holiday home for insane price

first_imgThis property at 8 Noosa Parade, Noosa Heads, has sold for $9.62m.Billionaire developer Bob Ell has sold his Noosa holiday home for $9.6 million — nearly $2 million shy of its ambitious price tag, but three times what he paid for the site.The founder of Leda Holdings had been chasing an $11.5 million buyer for the riverfront property, on the doorstep of Hastings Street. The view from the Noosa Parade holiday house.Ell and wife, Bridget, bought the 780 sqm Noosa Parade site in 2011 for just $2.75 million and built a six-bedroom, seven-bathroom house. Described as offering ‘barefoot indulgence’, the trophy home has multiple living and dining areas, a gas fireplace, a commercial-grade kitchen, a $100,000 gym and an L-shaped pool. The pool at the property at 8 Noosa Parade, Noosa Heads.The house was sold with furniture including a timber chandelier, lavish alpaca wool carpets, textural wallpaper, remote-controlled curtains, a 10-seater dining table and sumptuous sofas. Upstairs, the bedrooms all have marble bathrooms, the master with a walk-in robe, a sunroom and a covered balcony with a sweeping view. This property at 8 Noosa Parade, Noosa Heads, has just sold.There is also a media room, reading room, kitchenette and laundry.Downstairs the sixth bedroom, currently used as a private study, reading or television room has an ensuite which includes a steam shower. More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus9 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market9 hours agoInside the house at Noosa Parade, Noosa Heads.The wharf comes with a floating pontoon and a boat shed with storage for surf boards, paddle boards, boating and pool equipment.Selling agent Tom Offermann of Tom Offermann Real Estate described the property as “arguably one of the finest, most sought-after riverfront properties”. Gold Coast-based developer and billionaire Bob Ell.“Add natural assets such as waves peeling off the point at National Park, winter temps of 23 degrees at 10am, the north-facing protected beach and pristine waterways,” Mr Offermann said. “No wonder there’s no place like Noosa.”The Ells are based on the Gold Coast.last_img read more

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ICC World Cup WATCH – Sheldon Cottrell’s brilliant catch to dismiss Steve Smith will leave you shocked

first_img New Delhi: The ICC Cricket World Cup 2019 has produced some magnificent catches. Ben Stokes’ one-handed effort to catch Andile Phehlukwayo off Adil Rashid in the opening game of the ICC Cricket World Cup 2019 clash between England and South Africa has been dubbed as one of the best catches in the tournament. Chris Woakes took a brilliant catch to send back Imam-ul-Haq off Moeen Ali in the match against Pakistan in Trent Bridge. Quinton de Kock took a superb catch off Virat Kohli in the game between India and South Africa in Southampton. In the game between Australia and West Indies in Trent Bridge, Sheldon Cottrell joined the list with a jaw-dropping effort.In the second ball of the 45th over bowled by Oshane Thomas, Steve Smith, who had revived the innings with his 20th fifty and shared a partnership of over 100 with Nathan Coulter-Nile, looked to pile on the agony for the West Indies. A full ball from Thomas on the pads was whipped in the air by Smith to the deep midwicket fence. It was destined to go for a six but Cottrell had other ideas. The left-arm pacer ran to his left and stuck out his left hand as the ball lodged in his hand. However, the momentum was carrying him over the ropes. Cottrell flung the ball in the air, leapt over the ropes and leapt back him while continuing to keep his eyes on the ball. The fielder completed the catch and Smith was given his marching orders.Sheldon Cottrell take a bow #CWC19Nottingham pic.twitter.com/HiK9LRlrzu— Matt Wade (@mattwade87) June 6, 2019Smith and Coulter-Nile, who smashed the highest individual score for a number eight batsman in World Cup history, revived Australia after their top order was blown away by the hostility of the West Indies pacers. David Warner, Aaron Finch, Glenn Maxwell and Usman Khawaja were sent back cheaply and it took a gritty partnership from Smith and Alex Carey to revive the innings. Australia are playing the West Indies for the first time in a World Cup after 12 years. The five-time champions started their 2019 campaign on a high with a win against Afghanistan while West Indies trounced Pakistan. highlights For all the Latest Sports News News, ICC World Cup News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps. Steve Smith smashed his 20th fifty.West Indies have not beaten Australia in World Cups since 1996.West Indies defeated Pakistan in their 2019 World Cup opener.last_img read more

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Student activists continue to fight for inclusion

first_imgOn Friday, nearly 200 people stood at the Von Kleinsmid Center in the pouring rain. They were there to protest the inauguration of President Donald Trump, as they heard speeches from members of the Black Student Assembly, the Muslim Student Union, the Student Worker Action Group and the Price Student Organizations Coalition. Christina Gutierrez, a third-year graduate student majoring in public administration and urban planning, spoke about the importance of granting support to underrepresented communities, including black, Latino/a, LGBT and undocumented students.“It is students who have to fight for equity and justice,” Gutierrez said. “It’s appalling that [the University] doesn’t do so much to support undocumented students.”While both parties have support on campus, most of the protests and rallies have been visibly anti-Trump. From the night of the election to the days preceding Trump’s inauguration, members of the USC community have mirrored a series of protests occurring worldwide, making the campus a hub for student activism. This wave of resistance is relatively new for USC, which is not historically known for being politically active. The rallies and protests against Trump on campus have not only involved students and staff from USC, but also students from local high schools. Two days after the election, teens from South Los Angeles staged a walkout, joining some USC students who had organized a “human wall” along Trousdale Parkway.The protests have not solely concentrated on students’ dissatisfaction with the election results, but also on the inclusion of underrepresented students at USC.The proposal for USC to become a sanctuary campus, which would protect undocumented students, faculty members and their families from deportation under the new presidential administration, has ignited discussion on campus. The initiative was introduced by a faculty-driven petition, and supported by an Undergraduate Student Government resolution, that urged the USC administration to protect undocumented students.USG Director of Community Affairs Mai Mizuno said that after attending a talk by L.A. Mayor Eric Garcetti about Los Angeles’ status as a sanctuary city, she came to believe USC should declare itself a sanctuary as well as a symbolic gesture.“My hope moving forward is that USC adopts a similar tangible legal initiative [like Los Angeles] that really institutionalizes the idea of a sanctuary campus,” Mizuno said.Two days before Trump’s inauguration, faculty members organized the Rally for Inclusion and Tolerance, where professors shared speeches and book passages that encouraged those in attendance to know their rights and continue to be in solidarity with those who are underrepresented.Nadja Barlera, a senior majoring in English, attended the rally and said that it was a “good first step” for USC professors to creating a more inclusive campus.“It’s important for faculty to speak because they are part of our community too, and they are affected by policies,” Barlera said. “It’s also important for them to make these sorts of public statements so that students feel safe and supported.”While these rallies and protests have recently begun at USC after Trump’s election, in the past USC has not been known for political and social justice resistance. Campuses such as UC Berkeley, which saw the birth of the Free Speech Movement in the 1960s, are viewed as more politically active, according to some students. “USC is known as the campus that is mild when it comes to political activism,” Collins said. “[But] it is part of our democracy to speak [our] grievances when [we] have them.”Beyond college campuses, USC students participated in worldwide Women’s March as an act of protest against the rhetoric of Trump. Maddie Hengst, assistant director of Student Assembly for Gender Empowerment, was one of the many in attendance.“The Women’s March was an important step in invigorating activists across campus, and the country, by restoring hope and purpose,” Hengst said. “But that being said, it’s important that the folks involved take further action steps, such as contacting representatives in Washington and donating or volunteering with organizations. SAGE recently has been advocating on behalf of Planned Parenthood.”Despite this perceived historical apathy, members of the USC community such as Billy Vela, the director of El Centro Chicano, have highlighted the importance of having students speak out in this way.“These demonstrations are important because I see our students engaged in meaningful issues of our time,” Vela said. “These issues are real, they impact lives and families. They are at the core of what higher education is all about at a local, state, country and global level.”Muhammad Yusuf Tarr contributed to this article.last_img read more

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