Beat writers predict Syracuse to blow out Texas Southern in final nonconference game

first_imgSyracuse (9-3) faces Texas Southern (1-9) in its final nonconference game of the season on Sunday at 2 p.m. in the Carrier Dome. The second-ever meeting between these two teams will be broadcast on ESPNU.Read what our beat writers predict will happen in the game:Sam Blum (8-4)Syracuse 78, Texas Southern 52Holiday LeftoversSyracuse practiced on Christmas and enjoys a nice feast at the expense of Texas Southern on Sunday. The Orange finishes the nonconference season as it should, by picking apart a team that has won just one game this season. TSU has one of the worst defenses in college basketball, and lost by 20 to Clemson, the only other Atlantic Coast Conference foe on its schedule. Happy holidays.Jesse Dougherty (8-4)Syracuse 76, Texas Southern 57Southern comfort AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSyracuse hasn’t blown many teams out this season, but it collects its third straight lopsided win in the Carrier Dome on Sunday. The Tigers are a rare undersized, not-so-talented team that doesn’t hoist 3-pointers, making them an outside candidate to be effective against the Orange zone. Because of that, SU is stingy on defense and literally runs Texas Southern out of the stadium before turning its focus to Pittsburgh and the start of ACC play.Matt Schneidman (8-4)Syracuse 76, Texas Southern 54Mess with TexasThere’s a formula to beat the zone but Texas Southern doesn’t have it. The Tigers are a physically inferior team and one not exactly keen on hoisting from beyond the arc. Syracuse gets to double-digit wins with ease and it may be a bit misleading. But before a daunting ACC slate begins with Pittsburgh, the Orange will take a win however it comes. Comments Related Stories Syracuse basketball opponent preview: What to know about Texas SouthernWhat we learned from Syracuse’s win over Montana State Facebook Twitter Google+center_img Published on December 26, 2015 at 7:33 pmlast_img read more

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Sheffield brings new discipline to UW

first_imgThe University of Wisconsin volleyball team’s inaugural week of spring practice with new head coach Kelly Sheffield was not exactly a friendly gathering.At day’s end, it was expected that the team collect all of the balls from the court that were used during practice. However, one forgotten ball was the exact type of imprecision Sheffield is trying to eradicate from the program – the players were forced to do intense cardio work as a penalty, which is something sophomore Ellen Chapman said the team had never seen with former head coach Pete Waite.“We had a rough first couple of days,” Chapman said. “[Sheffield] just set the tone for what things need to be like in this program now, which was a big difference from last year.”After barely three weeks of team practice, Sheffield has already stamped an impression on his new team. Junior Annemarie Hickey said Sheffield has already instilled a sense of responsibility with the players, and his firmness at practice signaled to the players they should be prepared for an effort-filled season.“[That] was good; it’s what we wanted,” Hickey said. “We all wanted to be held accountable for the same type of things.”It is clear to the players Sheffield has taken a serious approach to the UW volleyball program. Chapman said if the players didn’t buy into Sheffield’s system, he would help them find a different school that was a better fit for them.However, Chapman felt there was more of a unified feeling on the team because of Sheffield’s leadership. She said the coaches, players and trainers were all fragmented pieces of a disorganized puzzle last year. But since Sheffield’s arrival, everyone involved with the program has come closer together.“When we huddle, everyone comes into the huddle,” Chapman said. “It’s a lot different from last year.”At this point in his short-lived tenure as Wisconsin head coach, Sheffield emphasized he is still trying to understand the strengths and weaknesses of his players.However, he has already learned they are willing to improve. After an hour and a half team weight lifting session, Hickey spent additional time afterwards serving and passing by herself, something Chapman said would not have happened in previous seasons.“They’re wanting to prove to people that this program can get back on top,” Sheffield said. “There’s a drive that, every day, you can tell is coming out more and more with these guys.”An additional characteristic Sheffield has brought to Wisconsin is a sense of structure. Chapman said, in past years, the players did not know what they were going to be practicing on a day-to-day basis. This year, Sheffield has set a more organized practice agenda for the team by establishing a whiteboard that lets every player know what is planned for the day.Sheffield also has a respected coaching history that backs his sense of determination with the team – he has won seven conference titles in twelve years as a head coach, including four in five seasons at the University of Dayton.Sheffield has stressed that his goal this spring is to raise his players’ consistency in effort and competition. He said while it is natural to panic when faced with adversity, the team needs to do a better job of responding positively to difficult situations.“You’re not only trying to get to know them and working on techniques, but you’re trying to get them to compete at a level that is absolutely necessary in this conference to be successful,” Sheffield said.Sheffield said he has already seen vast improvements in the players in slightly more than two weeks of spring practice.The Badgers started their spring schedule strongly by defeating Loyola March 16 by way of a 3-0 sweep. Wisconsin has two more home spring exhibition matches against UW-Green Bay and UW-Milwaukee scheduled for this month. While the Badgers normally have only one spring match at the UW Field House, Sheffield said he wants to display the team’s improvement over a series of matches.Even after a surprising start to the fresh team-coach dynamic, the players have responded well to Sheffield’s arrival. Hickey said that he has shown sincere investment in his team, not only as volleyball players, but as students and people.Hickey also said he has shown a deep commitment to the program’s success and expects his players to be on board with that same approach.“He wants to win,” Hickey said. “He lets us know when we need to be doing better, but he also reassures us that we are working hard and lets us know that he cares.”last_img read more

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