Partners, from grade school to Medical School

first_imgThis is one in a series of profiles showcasing some of Harvard’s stellar graduates.When Rosh and Roshan Sethi were small, their mother used to bring them to work with her. A physician, her days were long. The boys, fraternal twins born minutes apart, would bring sleeping bags and nap under her desk.Today, the two are still together, preparing to graduate from Harvard Medical School and contemplating futures in clinics of their own.“It’s just like no other profession, in terms of what you get to do — like science, like stories, like people.” Roshan said. “You just learn a lot about the world through medicine. You meet all kinds of people who’ve had all kinds of lives.”Roshan is planning to attend a one-year internal medicine residency program at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital, followed by a radiation oncology program that spans several Harvard-affiliated hospitals. Rosh, who is interested in otolaryngology (head and neck surgery), is planning on a one-year surgical internship at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), followed by a residency at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, both Harvard affiliates, in a program that also involves other Harvard-affiliated hospitals.“I can’t pinpoint early on why I wanted to be a surgeon, but to me it was just a unique way to impact a patient’s life,” Rosh said. “Especially for ENT [ear, nose, and throat surgery], it’s a very big impact on a patient’s quality of life, which was important to me.”The twins were in the same classes through grade school and high school and attended Yale University as undergraduates, rooming together for two of their four years. Today, they share an apartment in Brookline, and they’ll continue to live together during this next phase of training.They also were together during a time both recall as influential. As teenagers, they volunteered at a local cancer clinic near their hometown of Calgary, Canada. They pushed a cart through the palliative care ward, serving high tea on fine china to patients undergoing cancer treatment. Neither had met patients with cancer before.The experience influenced Roshan’s interest in cancer medicine and Rosh’s in head and neck surgery, which can be employed in cancer care.They took similar trajectories through medical school, with each taking time off to expand their horizons, though in different directions. Rosh spent a year at the Harvard School of Public Health, earning a master’s in public health, and worked with David Roberson at Boston Children’s Hospital on a quality-improvement collaborative around tracheostomy care.During his first year, Rosh also spent time working on the nonprofit Family Van, which brings medical services into Boston’s disadvantaged neighborhoods.HMS Dean for Students Nancy Oriol, the Family Van’s founder, said that Rosh’s essay reflecting on his experience there caught her eye. In it, Rosh said that the van program taught him that even though cases are handled by following medical routines and specific technical steps, each case is a person first, with whom one must connect to build trust. Oriol spoke with him recently and, although the crush of medical school can cause once-meaningful experiences to fade over time, Rosh told her that the Family Van’s lesson was one he has carried with him.“The common element [among students working on the Family Van] is that they want to take care of patients,” Oriol said. “They’re both excellent students. They’ve been fantastic from the beginning.”Roshan spent a year on a Doris Duke Fellowship conducting research at MGH, traveled to Rwanda to work with the nonprofit Partners In Health, and has been exercising his writing chops working with Amy Holden Jones, creator of the ABC television series “Black Box” about a neurologist secretly dealing with bipolar disorder. Roshan has served as a medical consultant on some of the episodes for its premier season, and said he enjoyed the experience enough to keep writing, though he doesn’t see that as ever supplanting medicine as a career.Roshan conducted research in the lab of Shannon MacDonald, assistant professor of radiation oncology at MGH and Harvard Medical School. She said it was a pleasure to work with him and play a part in his professional development.“Roshan possesses all of the attributes you could hope for in young physician: compassion, intelligence, true excitement for the field of medicine, a hunger for learning, and, despite his many talents, humility,” MacDonald said.  “Roshan will touch many lives in a positive way regardless of what he ultimately chooses to pursue in his career.”last_img read more

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State-of-the-art wind tunnel advances hypersonic flight research

first_imgCourtesy of Andrew Bustard The Notre Dame Hypersonic Aerodynamics Lab unveiled a quiet Mach 6 hypersonic tunnel in 2018. Since then, the department has continued to pursue innovation in flight technology.Thomas Juliano, assistant professor of aerospace and mechanical engineering, established the lab and began the project in August 2014. Juliano said his motivation behind the project is the possibility of hypersonic flight in the future. “The story of transportation for the last 2,000 years has been finding ways to go faster and faster,” Juliano said. “This is merely the latest step in that.”Juliano previously worked with a smaller-scale quiet wind tunnel as a graduate student at Purdue University before coming to Notre Dame. “We can do a lot with that, but we want to be able to test longer models in order to see more of what’s going on,” Juliano said. “The logical next step for facility development in order to unlock these other investigations in fluid mechanics was to build a larger-scale item.”Challenges for hypersonic flight include extremely high temperatures that surround aircraft when going thousands of miles per hour, said first-year doctoral student Andrew Bustard. “The high-heating rates, if not designed around, will destroy your vehicle,” Bustard said. “Obviously, we don’t want that. But the flow physics is so complex that we don’t actually understand fully what’s causing the heating or the best way to reduce it, so the whole point of this group is to study the flow around objects around potential or get a better understanding of the flow around high-speed objects.”The Mach 6 quiet wind tunnel is unique as it better replicates the silent noise that occurs in the atmosphere, Bustard said. “Most facilities we have on the ground have way more noise than in the atmosphere,” Bustard said. “If we truly want to model the heating in the atmosphere, we need to have flow in our wind tunnel that represents those atmospheric conditions. [The quiet tunnel] better matches the atmosphere, and that’s why it’s very useful for us.”The Mach 6 tunnel project has provided opportunities for multiple engineering students to get involved in hypersonic research. Erik Hoberg, a third-year doctoral student, specializes in flow characterization and wind tunnel design. He has been involved in the project for a little over a year. ”I was not part of [Juliano’s] group when I came to Notre Dame,” Hoberg said. “Then I met him and saw what his group was doing and really wanted to be on that project.”Fifth-year doctoral candidate Carson Running has helped with the quiet tunnel since his first year of graduate school. He worked heavily on the design and building of the tunnel in the early years of the project. “One question that I researched was the best way to heat the large surface area [of the wind tunnel],” Running said. “We actually found a company down in Texas that sells these big long heating blankets that can just be wrapped around the steel portions of the wind tunnel and set to a certain temperature that we desire.”Running spoke to the challenges of designing a state-of-the-art quiet tunnel that can advance the progress of hypersonic flight.  “A lot of the problems we’re trying to solve from small to big haven’t really been solved before, so overcoming that was … doing a lot of research but also a ton of collaboration and meetings with professor Juliano, using his expertise and kind of working together,” Running said. “One thing that I always like that [Juliano] says when he assigns projects or assignments to us is, ‘I wouldn’t be assigning them to you if I knew how to do them.’ He really does need our help and is willing to work with us and bounce ideas off of each other.”Tags: aerospace engineering, Wind tunnel Faculty and students at the Notre Dame Hypersonic Aerodynamics Lab unveiled the largest quiet Mach 6 hypersonic wind tunnel in the United States on Nov. 30, 2018. Nearly a year later, the lab continues to apply the technology to the future of flying.last_img read more

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NFF’s Committee Submits Damning Report on Why Nasarawa Utd’s Player Died

first_imgDuro IkhazuagbeThe Adhoc Committee on Safety and Security set up by the Nigeria Football Federation ((NFF) to unravel the circumstances that led to the death of Nasarawa United’s player, Chineme Martins in March, 2020 submitted its report to the federation yesterday with damning revelations.The Committee headed by respected Member of CAF’s Committee on Sports Medicine, Dr Peter Singabele, while submitting the report in a virtual conference to NFF’s President, Amaju Pinnick, revealed that Nasarawa United had neither a medical doctor nor a physiotherapist at the stadium on the day Martins collapsed and died during a NPFL home game at the Lafia Township Stadium. Chineme Martins “Instead, Nasarawa United had a retired community health assistant heading its medical team. And this led to the mismanagement of the rescucitation process of Martins,” revealed the report.It also noted that there was no functional ambulance stationed at the stadium on that fateful day.“There was no functional ambulance at the stadium as at the time of the incident, which led to a faulty evacuation process, and the player died before he could reach the hospital and; Nasarawa FA and Nasarawa United FC failed in their duties to put in place emergency medical services for the match,” stressed the report.Although the report admitted its handicap in getting an autopsy carried out on the late footballer due to the refusal of the family of the late footballer to release the body for the physical examination, it recommended that to forestall a repeat of such unnecessary death on Nigerian pitches, all clubs should have a minimum of one qualified medical officer and a physiotherapist.“All club players must undergo mandatory PCMA in line with CAF and FIFA standards; clubs must keep adequate medical records of players and officials and; there must be mandatory pre-season basic medical screening.”It also recommended things that home teams must provide before games should start; safety and security precautions to be assured by the State Football Association.It recommended the temporary suspension of the club from all NFF organised competitions.“The Nasarawa FA should be temporarily suspended from hosting all NFF-organized matches (including domestic league matches) until some clearly stated conditions are met.“The player (Martins) must be immortalized. Nasarawa United FC should pay a fine of N10million to the LMC for non-compliance with Club Licensing Regulations and violation of NPFL Framework and Rules, and should pay all financial entitlements of the late Martins immediately, including arrears of salaries and insurance benefits, if any.”While receiving the report in a virtual presentation, NFF President, Pinnick, praised the efforts of the federation’s Adhoc Committee on Safety and Security for a good job.Pinnick was categorical that the country’s supreme football –governing body would study the nitty-gritty of the committee’s recommendations with a view to implementing all.“I want to give kudos to the Chairman and Members of this committee for the thorough job they have done. I am not surprised because we brought together perhaps the best team possible in the land for such an assignment.“Your job was made more arduous given that it was at a time of the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak, and at a time, it was only your committee that was doing any work in football. Yet, you never wavered in painstakingly attending to every detail of the assignment.”The NFF boss said that the Federation would convey the full report, after it must have been signed by the members and at the resumption of football activities in the country, to the Honourable Minister of Youth and Sports Development, Mr. Sunday Dare.He also assured that the NFF will compel all the relevant organs concerned with security, safety and medical protocols at domestic matches to up their game, while insisting that any club that fails to comply one hundred per cent with the requirements of the Club Licensing regulations will be barred from competing in the league.“If at the end of the day, we have to scale down to playing league matches in only a few stadia that can provide functional ambulances and qualified medical personnel with capable referral hospitals, so be it,” he concludedMembership of the Committee include: Dr. Peter Singabele (Chairman); Mazi Amanze Uchegbulam (Member); Alh. Ibrahim Musa Gusau (Member); Alh. Abba Yola (Member); Otunba Tade Azeez (Member); Dr. Paul Onyeudo (Member); Mallam Salihu Abubakar (Member); Dr. Ibrahim Gyaran (Member); Mr. Tijani Babangida (Member); Mr. Francis Adejoh (Member); Mr. Oladuni Oyekale (Member); Mr. Ademola Olajire (Member); Miss Remi Kisu Sulola (Member); Mr. China Acheru (Secretary).Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

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