Dworkin Wins National Recognition

first_imgDworkin’s Leadership Wins National RecognitionFormer Vermont Public Service Board Chairman Michael Dworkin has won a national award recognizing his work in founding the Vermont Law School’s Institute for Energy and the Environment.The Mary Kilmarx Award is given annually by the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners’ Energy Resources and the Environment (ERE) Committee to someone whose work reflects the Committee’s goals of promoting good government, clean energy and the environment.”Michael Dworkin’s work in the energy and environmental field is internationally known, and his commitment to education and conservation as demonstrated with the Institute for Energy and the Environment made him an ideal candidate for the Mary Kilmarx Award,” said Commissioner Rick Morgan of the District of Columbia, who presented the award on behalf of the ERE Committee. “This Award recognizes those who have gone above and beyond the call of duty-traits that personify Michael Dworkin.”Dworkin was presented the award on Nov. 17 during NARUC’s 120th Annual Convention in New Orleans. ERE members had several reasons to present Dworkin with the award-notably his past chairmanship of the Vermont Public Service Board and the ERE Committee, and his work with the Institute for Energy and the Environment.Dworkin founded the Institute in 2005 after leaving the Public Service Board. The Institute is an international resource for energy law and policy. It offers a full course curriculum during the academic year and a series of summer seminars as well. The Institute’s student researchers work on pressing energy concerns such as energy self-reliance, carbon sequestration, and renewable energy sources. “The Institute is about building the right mix for thinking with global ideals and acting with rigorous pragmatism,” Dworkin said. “Our mission is to have fewer greenhouse gas emissions in 50 years because of the work we do today, and in 100 years because of the work our students do tomorrow. Its been a joy to find that Vermont Law provides a base for paralleling the work that Mary Kilmarx taught so many NARUC members to pursue for just such goals.”First awarded in 2002, the honor is named for Mary Kilmarx, a former commissioner and staff member at the Rhode Island Public Utilities Commission, who served as staff co-chair of the ERE Committee when it was called the Energy Conservation Committee and provided its members with inspiration for many years.Past winners of the Kilmarx Award are: Former Montana Public Service Commissioner Bob Anderson; Former Vermont Public Service Board Chairman Richard Cowart; the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Kathleen Hogan; Former Maine Public Utilities Commission member Cheryl Harrington; Natural Resources Defense Council Senior Attorney Ralph Cavanagh; and Executive Director of the Southwest Energy Efficiency Project Howard Geller.last_img read more

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Governor Tom Wolf Statement on Trooper Shot and Killed in Huntingdon County

first_img December 30, 2016 SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Statement Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf released the following statement on Pennsylvania State Police Trooper Landon Weaver, who was shot and killed in the line of duty in Huntingdon County:“On behalf of all Pennsylvanians, Frances and I extend our deepest condolences and prayers to the family and friends of Trooper Weaver and all members of the State Police across Pennsylvania in this moment of tragedy. Landon will always be remembered for his bravery, his sacrifice, and his willingness to serve.“The State Police are our best and bravest Pennsylvanians, who risk their lives to keep all of our families safe. I just spoke with Commissioner Tyree Blocker and have full confidence that the person who committed this senseless act of violence will be captured and brought to justice. As the search continues, all of our law enforcement officers involved are in the thoughts of all Pennsylvanians.”Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolfcenter_img Governor Tom Wolf Statement on Trooper Shot and Killed in Huntingdon Countylast_img read more

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Student activists continue to fight for inclusion

first_imgOn Friday, nearly 200 people stood at the Von Kleinsmid Center in the pouring rain. They were there to protest the inauguration of President Donald Trump, as they heard speeches from members of the Black Student Assembly, the Muslim Student Union, the Student Worker Action Group and the Price Student Organizations Coalition. Christina Gutierrez, a third-year graduate student majoring in public administration and urban planning, spoke about the importance of granting support to underrepresented communities, including black, Latino/a, LGBT and undocumented students.“It is students who have to fight for equity and justice,” Gutierrez said. “It’s appalling that [the University] doesn’t do so much to support undocumented students.”While both parties have support on campus, most of the protests and rallies have been visibly anti-Trump. From the night of the election to the days preceding Trump’s inauguration, members of the USC community have mirrored a series of protests occurring worldwide, making the campus a hub for student activism. This wave of resistance is relatively new for USC, which is not historically known for being politically active. The rallies and protests against Trump on campus have not only involved students and staff from USC, but also students from local high schools. Two days after the election, teens from South Los Angeles staged a walkout, joining some USC students who had organized a “human wall” along Trousdale Parkway.The protests have not solely concentrated on students’ dissatisfaction with the election results, but also on the inclusion of underrepresented students at USC.The proposal for USC to become a sanctuary campus, which would protect undocumented students, faculty members and their families from deportation under the new presidential administration, has ignited discussion on campus. The initiative was introduced by a faculty-driven petition, and supported by an Undergraduate Student Government resolution, that urged the USC administration to protect undocumented students.USG Director of Community Affairs Mai Mizuno said that after attending a talk by L.A. Mayor Eric Garcetti about Los Angeles’ status as a sanctuary city, she came to believe USC should declare itself a sanctuary as well as a symbolic gesture.“My hope moving forward is that USC adopts a similar tangible legal initiative [like Los Angeles] that really institutionalizes the idea of a sanctuary campus,” Mizuno said.Two days before Trump’s inauguration, faculty members organized the Rally for Inclusion and Tolerance, where professors shared speeches and book passages that encouraged those in attendance to know their rights and continue to be in solidarity with those who are underrepresented.Nadja Barlera, a senior majoring in English, attended the rally and said that it was a “good first step” for USC professors to creating a more inclusive campus.“It’s important for faculty to speak because they are part of our community too, and they are affected by policies,” Barlera said. “It’s also important for them to make these sorts of public statements so that students feel safe and supported.”While these rallies and protests have recently begun at USC after Trump’s election, in the past USC has not been known for political and social justice resistance. Campuses such as UC Berkeley, which saw the birth of the Free Speech Movement in the 1960s, are viewed as more politically active, according to some students. “USC is known as the campus that is mild when it comes to political activism,” Collins said. “[But] it is part of our democracy to speak [our] grievances when [we] have them.”Beyond college campuses, USC students participated in worldwide Women’s March as an act of protest against the rhetoric of Trump. Maddie Hengst, assistant director of Student Assembly for Gender Empowerment, was one of the many in attendance.“The Women’s March was an important step in invigorating activists across campus, and the country, by restoring hope and purpose,” Hengst said. “But that being said, it’s important that the folks involved take further action steps, such as contacting representatives in Washington and donating or volunteering with organizations. SAGE recently has been advocating on behalf of Planned Parenthood.”Despite this perceived historical apathy, members of the USC community such as Billy Vela, the director of El Centro Chicano, have highlighted the importance of having students speak out in this way.“These demonstrations are important because I see our students engaged in meaningful issues of our time,” Vela said. “These issues are real, they impact lives and families. They are at the core of what higher education is all about at a local, state, country and global level.”Muhammad Yusuf Tarr contributed to this article.last_img read more

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