IT’S STILL NOT GUNS

first_imgMaking Sense by Michael ReaganDuring the intense media coverage of Wednesday’s tragic events in Parkland, Fla., I was shocked to hear it was the 18th school shooting so far this year.18. In 45 days.That sounds terrible.That sounds like a huge American crisis that needs to be addressed immediately by our great leaders in Washington.But that 18 number, which the anti-gun lobby in the media has emphasized without going into the details of the individual incidents, is highly misleading.None of those previous shootings was anything like the horrible one on Wednesday that left 17 students and teachers dead at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.The year’s worst previous shooting, which happened in Kentucky at a high school less than a month ago, left two students dead and 14 wounded by gunfire.The only other death was a single murder that occurred on a college campus.Two of the shootings that occurred at one of the country’s 120,000 public and private schools this year were suicides.Some involved guns firing accidentally. And most of the other incidents were random shootings on public school property that resulted in no one being hurt.But these details of the earlier shootings didn’t matter to religious anti-gun nuts in the media like Don Lemon of CNN and liberal politicians like Sen. Chris Murphy of Connecticut.Before we knew hardly anything about the Parkland shooting they were offering their usual simplistic solution for stopping what Murphy exaggeratedly called “this epidemic of mass slaughter” in our schools.To no one’s surprise, they called for new laws to control or outlaw guns, especially semi-automatic rifles like the AR-15.Lemon and Murphy will never give up their gun-control pipe dreams.But those of us who live in the real world know that no law will ever be devised or enforced that can stop a determined mass killer from getting his hands on a gun if he wanted one badly enough.Anyway, guns aren’t the problem. There are 300 million of all kinds floating around the country. An infinitesimal fraction are used by people to hurt other people.But there has to be something going on in our society that has caused angry, evil or mentally disturbed young men to plan and carry out these rare mass shootings at Columbine, Sandy Hook and Parkland.Is it because of social media? Violent video games? Bullying in schools? Broken families? Anti-depressant drugs? Boredom? All of the above? Something else?Whatever the cause, we need to sit down as a country and figure out how we can identify, help or stop crazy or violent individuals before they carry out their deadly attacks.Meanwhile, forget the gun-control politics. If we really want to protect our kids in schools we have to get serious.We need to put guards in our schools – armed guards, not spectators.We need make sure any potential mass killer, young or old, knows that our schools are no longer “gun free” zones.Better yet, as Judge Andrew Napolitano of Fox News suggests, we need to copy the Israelis.For years they’ve successfully protected their schoolchildren’s lives from attack with strong fences, locked gates, careful ID checks and cameras.But they’ve also done the smartest thing – arming and training classroom teachers who can defend against intruders. And no one knows which teacher is packing a gun.Increasing security at our nearly 100,000 public schools to prevent future Parklands will cost us a lot of money.Local districts and the states should pay most of the tab. But how about this idea:Instead of the federal government raising my gas tax 12 cents a gallon and pretending it’s going to be used to fix our highways, why not use the money to hire guards for our schools – and give them guns they know how to use.FOOTNOTE: THIS ARTICLE WAS POSTED BY THE CITY COUNTY OBSERVER WITHOUT ANY OPINION, BIAS OR EDITING.We hope that article will provoke honest and open dialogue concerning issues that we, as responsible citizens of this community, need to address in a rational and responsible way?”FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

Read more

Basketball: 14 D’Tigress for 2020 Olympics qualification tournament

first_imgRelatedPosts D’Tigers, D’Tigress await 2020 Olympics foes D’Tigers, D’Tigress can win an Olympic medal — Kida Two Air Warriors players to attend 2020 Olympics, courtesy of Minister D’Tigress head coach, Otis Hughley, has called up 14 players for the last phase of the 2020 Olympics Qualification Tournament billed for Belgrade between February 6 and 9, 2020. Louisville University guard, Elizabeth Balogun, who was not released by her school for the pre-OQT, got another invitation from D’Tigress handler alongside Nigeria-based Musa Murjanantu, who emerged as the Zenith Bank Women Basketball League Most Valuable Player after guiding Air Warriors of Abuja to their first ever league title. Virtus Eirene of Italy small forward, Ifunanya Ibekwe, Promise Amukamara (Charnay Basket Bourgogne SUD, Frace), Sarah Imovbioh (Basket Namur Capitale, Belgium) and Spain-based Elo Edeferioka, who plies her trade with CB Vigo, have also earned a recall. Others include point-guard, Upe Atosu, currently studying and playing for Butler University in the United States of America. Pallas Kunaiyi Akpannah may be on course to continue building her fledging national team career after debuting for Nigeria at the pre-qualifiers in Maputo, Mozambique in November, while usual suspects Ezinne Kalu, Evelyn Akhator, Aisha Balarabe and team captain, Adaora Elonu, have all been included in the 14 man list. Nigeria is grouped alongside host Serbia, World Champions USA and Mozambique with two Olympics tickets on offer.Tags: D’TigressElo EdeferiokaIfunanya IbekweOtis Hughleylast_img read more

Read more

BWI Principal Outlines Achievements, Challenges

first_imgMr. Alexander M. Massey, Interim Principal of the Booker Washington Institute (BWI), has outlined what he described as the “existing state of affairs and accomplishments report” of the institute in recent years.In his remarks during a program marking the institute’s 86th Founders Day anniversary on Saturday, June 28, Mr. Massey said BWI’s current enrollment stands at 1139, down from a population of 1361 last school year in spite of “our best efforts to narrow this gap.”“We are of the opinion that the total enrolment is still a little too large because it exceeds our targeted student to teacher ratio of 35/40 to one and therefore impacts our ability to provide a premium learning environment for each of our students,” he asserted.The equal percentages of day and boarding students occurring last school year has changed to 60 percent boarding and 40 percent day students this academic year.The reason for this change, in part, can be attributed to the policy of returning BWI to the tradition of a boarding school where it was mandatory starting last school year for each freshman student to live on campus, Massey explained.Upgrades to the dormitories along with much needed improvements in the quality of the food served in the dining hall may have served to promote the policy to return BWI to an exclusively boarding institution, said Massey.In academic performance, BWI experienced a modest increase in the number of students making the honor roll last school year over the previous year. “We still had about 26 percent of our total enrollment failing one or more subjects,” reported Massey.The slight increase in the number of students making the honor roll last year, Massey said, was perhaps due to his administration establishing remedial classes for the students run by instructors three evenings a week.In addition to the evening classes, BWI has also introduced this year a four days a week “peer-on-peer” tutoring program utilizing a portion of the institute’s two hour lunch period in an attempt to provide additional remedial help and support for the students.The high failing rate continues to be an issue of outmost concern for his administration, Massey emphasized.“We have come to the realization that if we are going to reverse this trend and return BWI to the tradition of a Center of Excellence we are going to accomplish it in several significant ways.”He said BWI must adopt more rigorous standards and require higher expectations from its students, disclosing that his administration has begun to put in place some of the necessary measures in an effort to help elevate standards at BWI.Those measures include the recruitment and attraction of a better quality of students from across the country and the hiring of better qualified academic and trade instructors, Massey said.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Read more