Indonesia still deserves special treatment in global trade: Economists

first_img“Our human development index [HDI] is still low. Even though there are funds worth Rp 500 trillion for education, but if we look at Indonesia’s population, those with higher education make up only [a small] percentage. The biggest [demographic] is junior high school [graduates],” Aviliani said, contrasting such conditions with developed countries that had tech-savvy human resources.In the United Nations Development Programme’s Human Development Report 2018 Indonesia ranked 111th with an HDI score of 0.707, or 96 countries ranks below the US ranked in 15th place with an HDI of 0.920.Aside from the aforementioned parameter, Aviliani explained, numerous other characteristics justified Indonesia defending its developing country status. The majority of Indonesia’s population still works in agriculture with traditional farming equipment, and high levels of unemployment were indicators of a developing country, Aviliani said.The United States Trade Representative (USTR) rolled out a new policy in February and removed several countries from the list of developing and least-developed countries, including Indonesia.The new policy outlines that a developed country is one with more than 0.5 percent of trade significance to the world and a member of international organizations such as the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) or the Group of 20 (G20).Indonesia, accounting for 0.9 percent of global exports in 2018 and being a member of the G20, is therefore no longer eligible for subsidies.Read also: Growing pains: US tariff policy overshadows planned Jokowi visitINDEF researcher Ahmad Heri Firdaus said at the same event that, with the US’ new policy, Indonesia’s exported goods would be subject to higher import taxes, which could increase the price of the goods in the international market.According to a simulation he ran with the Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP), assuming that import tax would rise to 5 percent from the current position, Indonesia’s main export products to the US would suffer a loss of up to 2.5 percent. Several commodities would be affected, for example, textile product exports would decrease by 1.56 percent and components for electric machines were projected to decrease by 1.2 percent.“We can still claim to be a developing country, [but] of course, supported by strong research,” Heri said. (ydp)Topics : “Why do we need to make a declaration? Because our GNI per capita is far lower than that of [developed] countries. Indonesia’s is only around US$3,800 per capita. Compared with the United States, the gap is very big,” INDEF economist Tauhid Ahmad said in a press conference in Jakarta on Thursday.According to the World Bank’s parameter, high-income economies are those with a GNI per capita of $12,376. Indonesia with a GNI per capita of $3,840 in 2018 is considered a lower-middle-income economy, the category for countries with a GNI per capita between $1,026 and $3,995.Read also: Revocation of Indonesia’s developing country status will not affect GSP: GovernmentINDEF senior economist Aviliani said during the press conference that, based on several social development parameters, Indonesia had more characteristics of a developing country than a developed one. Indonesia still deserves special treatment in global trade despite the United States recently taking the archipelago off its list of developing countries, local economists have said.Economists of the Institute for Development of Economics and Finance (INDEF) said that, based on its gross national income (GNI) per capita and parameters of social development, among other factors, Indonesia should still be considered a developing country.They suggested that the government defend its developing nation status, so that Indonesia would continue to benefit from the World Trade Organization’s (WTO) special differential treatment (SDT), which exempts developing countries like Indonesia from strict trade rules.last_img read more

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Student activists continue to fight for inclusion

first_imgOn Friday, nearly 200 people stood at the Von Kleinsmid Center in the pouring rain. They were there to protest the inauguration of President Donald Trump, as they heard speeches from members of the Black Student Assembly, the Muslim Student Union, the Student Worker Action Group and the Price Student Organizations Coalition. Christina Gutierrez, a third-year graduate student majoring in public administration and urban planning, spoke about the importance of granting support to underrepresented communities, including black, Latino/a, LGBT and undocumented students.“It is students who have to fight for equity and justice,” Gutierrez said. “It’s appalling that [the University] doesn’t do so much to support undocumented students.”While both parties have support on campus, most of the protests and rallies have been visibly anti-Trump. From the night of the election to the days preceding Trump’s inauguration, members of the USC community have mirrored a series of protests occurring worldwide, making the campus a hub for student activism. This wave of resistance is relatively new for USC, which is not historically known for being politically active. The rallies and protests against Trump on campus have not only involved students and staff from USC, but also students from local high schools. Two days after the election, teens from South Los Angeles staged a walkout, joining some USC students who had organized a “human wall” along Trousdale Parkway.The protests have not solely concentrated on students’ dissatisfaction with the election results, but also on the inclusion of underrepresented students at USC.The proposal for USC to become a sanctuary campus, which would protect undocumented students, faculty members and their families from deportation under the new presidential administration, has ignited discussion on campus. The initiative was introduced by a faculty-driven petition, and supported by an Undergraduate Student Government resolution, that urged the USC administration to protect undocumented students.USG Director of Community Affairs Mai Mizuno said that after attending a talk by L.A. Mayor Eric Garcetti about Los Angeles’ status as a sanctuary city, she came to believe USC should declare itself a sanctuary as well as a symbolic gesture.“My hope moving forward is that USC adopts a similar tangible legal initiative [like Los Angeles] that really institutionalizes the idea of a sanctuary campus,” Mizuno said.Two days before Trump’s inauguration, faculty members organized the Rally for Inclusion and Tolerance, where professors shared speeches and book passages that encouraged those in attendance to know their rights and continue to be in solidarity with those who are underrepresented.Nadja Barlera, a senior majoring in English, attended the rally and said that it was a “good first step” for USC professors to creating a more inclusive campus.“It’s important for faculty to speak because they are part of our community too, and they are affected by policies,” Barlera said. “It’s also important for them to make these sorts of public statements so that students feel safe and supported.”While these rallies and protests have recently begun at USC after Trump’s election, in the past USC has not been known for political and social justice resistance. Campuses such as UC Berkeley, which saw the birth of the Free Speech Movement in the 1960s, are viewed as more politically active, according to some students. “USC is known as the campus that is mild when it comes to political activism,” Collins said. “[But] it is part of our democracy to speak [our] grievances when [we] have them.”Beyond college campuses, USC students participated in worldwide Women’s March as an act of protest against the rhetoric of Trump. Maddie Hengst, assistant director of Student Assembly for Gender Empowerment, was one of the many in attendance.“The Women’s March was an important step in invigorating activists across campus, and the country, by restoring hope and purpose,” Hengst said. “But that being said, it’s important that the folks involved take further action steps, such as contacting representatives in Washington and donating or volunteering with organizations. SAGE recently has been advocating on behalf of Planned Parenthood.”Despite this perceived historical apathy, members of the USC community such as Billy Vela, the director of El Centro Chicano, have highlighted the importance of having students speak out in this way.“These demonstrations are important because I see our students engaged in meaningful issues of our time,” Vela said. “These issues are real, they impact lives and families. They are at the core of what higher education is all about at a local, state, country and global level.”Muhammad Yusuf Tarr contributed to this article.last_img read more

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DONEGAL DAILY COMPETITION: WIN TWO FREE TICKETS TO MIKE DENVER AND AN OVERNIGHT STAY AT VILLA ROSE HOTEL

first_imgYou can win TWO Mike Denver Tickets AND an overnight Stay for TWO at the Villa Rose Hotel, Ballybofey.To enter simply share this story on your Facebook page and you will automatically be entered into the draw to WIN!Scoil Mhuire, Stranorlar are delighted to announce that Mike Denver and his band will be playing a Fundraising Dance in the Villa Rose Hotel on Sunday the 15th of March – Mother’s Day. This fundraiser is vitally important, as all money raised will be going towards the purchase of a set of class tablets and improvements needed in the Junior Yard.All involved have been working on this projects for a number of months and are hoping the fundraiser will make a huge difference.Organisers are asking for people from both near and far to support this dance on the night as every ticket counts and it is sure to be an enjoyable and lively occasion on the weekend before St. Patricks Day.The Villa Rose Hotel have package deals available to book with Tickets and Dinner included for only €39pp or an Overnight stay with Tickets & Dinner for only €75pp, this is the ideal Mother’s Day Gift. Tickets can be purchased from hotel reception or over the phone on 074-9132266.Entries for the draw close on 13/03/15. Prize is for 2 people sharing. Competition T&C apply. DONEGAL DAILY COMPETITION: WIN TWO FREE TICKETS TO MIKE DENVER AND AN OVERNIGHT STAY AT VILLA ROSE HOTEL was last modified: March 5th, 2015 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:EntertainmentFeaturesnewslast_img read more

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