IS IT TRUE OCTOBER 17, 2017

first_imgWe hope that todays “IS IT TRUE” will provoke “…honest and open dialogue concerning issues that we, as responsible citizens of this community, need to address in a rational and responsible way?”IS IT TRUE we are hearing that an unnamed Evansville City Council member has requested the Evansville City Controller, Russ Lloyd Jr to provide him with an accounting  breakdown of Invoices and Unrecorded Liabilities for 2015, 2016 and 2017?  … copies of the requested information were also sent to Council President Missy Mosby and 14 others individuals?  …the requested information has to do with: 1) Account Payable Open Items Reports for 2015-2017. 2) Accrued Compensation Hours for Police and Fire Employees as of Aug 16-18, 2017. 3) Accounting Notes reports for 12/31/2016 and for the City of Evansville and other Post-Employment Benefits (OPEB) as prescribed by GASB 45 actuarial calculation of retired employees health insurance liability. 4) Also provided to city officials were the accounting notes for the City of Evansville concerning the (PERF) Public Employees Retirement Fund of which Evansville participates in? …we are hearing that the above accounting information given to the unnamed Councilman, Council President Missy Mosby and 14 others may reveal some of the unreported deficit spending decisions of the Winnecke Administration?IS IT TRUE that local government don’t have a revenue problem they just have a spending problem?IS IT TRUE in Councilman Dan McGinn resignation e-mail he sent to GOP party chairman, Wayne Parker stated that; “You have criticized us for exercising our independent judgement (sic) and doing what we feel is best for the people we represent rather that marching lockstep to political doctrine”?  …we wonder why Mr. Parke didn’t take on Councilman McGinn for voting to build a multi-million dollar Penguim exhibit during the time of a serious budget crisis?  …Mr. Parke could have taken on Finance Chairman McGinn for continuing to push council members to take away our Homestead Tax Credits during the last several years?  …Chairman Parke could had taken on McGinn for not pushing council members to address the out of control city employees healthcare deficits? …Mr. Parke could had criticized Mr. McGinn for not cutting over $100,000 worth of city grants out of the city budget to area not-for-profits?  …Mr. Parke could have taken McGinn to task for voting to put back a $100,000 plus city grant in the budget to transport one (1) person to a job site located in the outer area of Highway 41? …Chairman Park could had ask why did Council Finance Chairman McGinn support the $12.5 advance payment (2018) of Tropicana riverboat  money to the city? …most of all Mr. Parke was correct in taking Mr. McGinn to task for voting to increase the County Income Option Tax (CIOT) for 2018?IS IT TRUE it looks like the days of the “TAX AND SPEND” habits of the Evansville City Council and the Winnecke Administration may be coming to an end?IS IT TRUE we are hearing that at least two of the three Republican primary candidates for the Vanderburgh County Commission race will be announcing this week?IS IT TRUE that that the son of former U S Congressman John Hostetter, Matt Hosetttler has announced that he shall be running for to soon to be vacated State House of Representative seat presently held by Thomas Washburne?  …Matt stated in his official announcement that “My family and I are very fortunate to call Indiana home. Our legislative body is a reflection of Hoosier commitment to both fiscal and personal responsibility with limited government interference. District 64 has exemplified these values through Representative Washburne, and it is my goal to pick up where he will leave off. This is a wonderful place for Michelle and me to raise our family, and I intend to ensure that it remains a wonderful place for my son to raise his?”IS IT TRUE it looks like the President of the Vanderburgh County Commission, Bruce Ungethiem will be facing the biggest challenge in his political career when he takes on Matt Hostetter in the District 64 State Representative Republican primary?  …we are told that when Mr. Ungethiem voted to pass a wheel tax in Vanderburgh County it costs him a lot of conservative votes?IS IT TRUE that the performance of the Indiana public schools was recently released and the news for the Evansville Vanderburgh School Corporation is both good and bad?…the good news is that there are now 5 EVSC schools that earned an A after years of having only 2 schools that earn the highest marks?… Scott and Oak Hill which serve the more affluent northern part of Vanderburgh County were the only two schools to earn the top grade for as long as most of us can remember were joined this year by Central and North high schools and Stockwell Elementary?…these three additions brings the A count to 5 and they are the northern most 5 schools in the county?…there are 35 schools in the EVSC so that means that only 14% of our schools are making an A?IS IT TRUE that nine EVSC schools got an F, which constitutes 26% of the schools in the EVSC?…those schools getting an F are: Academy for Innovative Studies, Caze, Cedar Hall, Delaware, Dexter, Evans, Glenwood Leadership Academy, Lodge and McGary?…these failing schools are located in the south and southeast parts of Evansville where minorities and economically challenged people tend to live?…that it seems like economic performance of the neighborhood is the biggest contributor to failing schools?…we suspect that if the teachers were traded that the results would not change a bit?…the real problem with student performance can usually be traced to active and supporting parents?…it is often the case that poor people have to choose between making a living and spending time with their children?…this is a vicious cycle that perpetuates itself into adulthood?IS IT TRUE 11 schools were given a B over last year’s 15; 7 schools got a C over the previous year of 8; and three schools were given a D, half of last year’s six?…this means that 46% of our schools were essentially A-B schools with the other 54% at or below C level?…there is still much room for improvement?…the three private/charter schools all got an A?…the Signature School in downtown Evansville has routinely been ranked the #1 public school in Indiana and among the top 10 public high schools in the country for over a decade now?…the success of the Signature School proves that there is nothing in the water that is making our students perform poorly?…what the EVSC should be doing is replicating the way that Signature does things as they blow the other 35 school including the five that made an A right out of the water?IS IT TRUE the Catholic schools seem to be performing very well with 18 As, 5 Bs and only 3 Cs?…the schools in the counties directly around Vanderburgh for the most part all performed better as a group than the  EVSC schools did?IS IT TRUE that Sears has just announced that the half century old anchor store at the Oxmoor Mall in Louisville will be closing in January?…rather than reposition the inventory, Sears will be having a blow out sale to get rid of it all?…one has to wonder how long Sears will be able to hold onto the anchor outpost at the Washington Square Mall on Evansville’s Eastside?…Sears is apparently the only original tenant of what was the first indoor mall in the State of Indiana?…this Christmas season will be another year when big box retail either makes a comeback or another round of stores gets Amazoned out of business?Todays READERS POLL question is: Do you support local GOP Party Chairmen Wayne Parke call for Councilman Dan McGinn to resign from City Council?Please take time and read our newest feature articles entitled “LAW ENFORCEMENT, READERS POLL, BIRTHDAYS, HOT JOBS” and “LOCAL SPORTS” posted in our sections.  You now are able to subscribe to get the CCO daily.If you would like to advertise in the CCO please contact us City-County [email protected]’S FOOTNOTE:  Any comments posted in this column do not represent the views or opinions of the City County Observer or our advertisersFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Liverpool v Man United combined all-time European XI: Find out who makes the cut

first_img 11 Left back: Alan Kennedy (Liverpool) – Kennedy scored the winning goal in two European Cup finals (1981 and 1984), with the second the final kick of a nervy penalty shootout against Roma in their own stadium. Honourable mention: Dennis Irwin Right midfielder: Cristiano Ronaldo – Impossible to leave out the competition’s highest ever goalscorer. Ronaldo’s goals and performances on the way to winning the 2008 trophy earned him the Ballon d’Or that year – even if he did miss a penalty in the final. Honourable mention: David Beckham 11 11 Centre back: Bill Foulkes (Manchester United) – He may not have as many trophies as some of his Liverpudian counterparts but Foulkes was one of only two men to win the 1968 European Cup final after surviving the 1958 Munich air disaster. He fittingly scored the goal to take Manchester United to that Wembley final. Honourable mentions: Jamie Carragher, Emlyn Hughes, Phil Thompson, Rio Ferdinand. Centre back: Alan Hansen (Liverpool) – Before he became Match of the Day’s top pundit and dropped the ‘you won’t win anything with kids’ clanger, Hansen won three European Cups during the ‘70s and ‘80s as Liverpool won everything possible. 11 Striker: George Best – Best dazzled in the 1968 final, turning Benfica’s defenders inside out on the way and scored in the final, as United became the first English club to win the Champions League. He also won the Ballon d’Or that year. Thursday night will signal the first time that Manchester United and Liverpool will face off in a European competition.It is one of the biggest rivalries in football with eight European Cups lifted between them.Manchester United became England’s first winners in 1968 before Liverpool won the competition four times in eight years from 1977 to 1984.They also boast arguably the two greatest comebacks in the competition’s history, with Manchester United scoring twice in injury time to beat Bayern Munich 2-1 in 1999 and Liverpool winning on penalties in 2005 despite losing 3-0 at half time to AC Milan.And despite the setting of their first European tussle being on the less glamorous stage of the Europa League, the rivalry will be no less fierce.Legends have made history for both sides but who has contributed more in Europe? Roy Keane or Graeme Souness? Steven Gerrard or Sir Bobby Charlton? Cristiano Ronaldo or Kevin Keegan?Some magnificent players have represented the clubs in Europe, far too many to fit into one team, but talkSPORT gave it a go anyway.Let us know who you think should have been included in the comments section below!Click the arrow, above, right to see the Manchester United and Liverpool combined all-time European XI. Right back: Phil Neal (Liverpool) – No Briton has won more European Cups, with Neal present for FOUR of Liverpool’s five triumphs. Only three players have won the competition more than the Englishman. Honourable mention: Gary Neville Centre midfielder: Steven Gerrard – Gerrard almost single-handedly dragged Liverpool to the podium to collect their fifth Champions League trophy with his displays in 2005. From his late rocket against Olympiakos to scrape through the group stages, to his header to begin the magnificent comeback from 3-0 down at half time, Gerrard optimised Liverpool’s miracle of Istanbul. 11 11 11 11 11 Left midfielder: Ryan Giggs – Giggs has won the trophy twice, scoring the winning penalty in the 2008 final. Only two players have played more games in the competition and the Welshman is the only player to score in 16 different Champions League seasons. Goalkeeper: Ray Clemence (Liverpool) – Prior to working within the England set up as a coach, Clemence won three European Cups with Liverpool, keeping two clean sheets in three of those finals in the process. Honourable mentions: Peter Schmeichel, Jerzy Dudek, Bruce Grobbelaar, Edwin van der Sar Centre midfielder: Bobby Charlton – Like Foulkes, Charlton was a survivor of 1958 tragedy who played in the emotional 1968 final success. Playing at centre midfield, Manchester United’s all-time top goalscorer bagged a brace as the club ran out 4-1 winners after extra-time. Honourable mentions: Paul Scholes, Roy Keane, Graeme Souness, Ray Kennedy 11 11 Striker: Kenny Dalglish – ‘King Kenny’ won three European Cups, including in 1978 when he scored the winner with a lovely dink over Club Brugge goalkeeper Birger Jensen. Honourable mentions: Ian Rush, Kevin Keegan, Ole Gunnar Solskjaer, Dwight Yorke, Andy Cole, Denis Lawlast_img read more

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This new surgical procedure could lead to lifelike prosthetic limbs

first_img Biomechatronics Lab Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) This new surgical procedure could lead to lifelike prosthetic limbs Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe By Matthew HutsonMay. 31, 2017 , 2:15 PMcenter_img Smart prosthetics such as the one in this rendering could be more responsive after the new surgical technique. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country The new technique, developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, creates such a pairing for prosthetic joint control. It respects “the fundamental motor unit in biology, two muscles acting in opposition,” says Hugh Herr, a biophysicist at MIT and co-developer of the method.Let’s say you lost your leg above the knee. Surgeons would take two small muscle grafts from somewhere in your body, each a few centimeters long, and suture them together end-to-end to form a linear pair. They would place the pair under the skin near the amputation site. Then they’d suture the two ends to the tissue under the skin, so that when one half of the muscle graft contracts, the other stretches. Finally, they’d connect severed nerve endings to the graft and allow the nerves to grow into it.Once the graft is healthy and connected, the researchers would use electrodes to connect each muscle to a smart prosthetic leg. The severed nerves that would normally tell the ankle to extend, for example, would instead go to one of the grafted muscles, which would contract, sending a signal to the robotic ankle to extend. As the grafted muscle contracts, its mirror opposite would stretch, sending a signal back to the brain. The grafts would receive additional electrical feedback from the smart prosthesis, indicating the ankle joint’s position and force, allowing for finer adjustments. Additional grafts could be added to control other joints in the prosthesis.The new technique, called an agonist­-antagonist myoneural interface, was tested in rodents. The MIT team operated on seven rats, severing muscles and nerves in the back right leg of each. Researchers then grafted on a pair of muscles about 3 centimeters long, connected severed nerves, and let the rats heal for 4 months. When electrodes were attached, the grafted muscles worked in tandem, one contracting and the other stretching. They also emitted electrical signals in proportion to the stimulation. That response suggests that the technique could allow for fine-grained control of a human prosthetic, the researchers report today in Science Robotics. What’s more, inspection under a microscope showed that the grafts healed well and were populated with new nerves and blood vessels and healthy neuromuscular junctions.“This is fairly low-risk. It’s minor surgery,” says Rickard Branemark, an orthopedic surgeon and prosthetics researcher at the University of California, San Francisco. Even without adding a prosthesis, growing severed nerves into muscle grafts could prevent painful neuromas, or abnormal nerve growth. With the new method and a smart prosthesis, “there’s every expectation that the human will feel position, will feel speed, will feel force in the same way that they once felt when they had a limb,” says Herr, who lost his own legs below the knees to frostbite while ice climbing, and is in line to get the procedure. He says they’ll have results from human trials within the next 2 years. Medicine has progressed a lot since the Civil War, but amputations haven’t. Once a limb is sliced off, surgeons wrap muscle around the raw end, bury nerve endings, and often attach a fixed prosthesis that is nowhere near as agile as the flesh-and-blood original. Better robotic limbs are available, but engineers are still figuring out how to attach them to people and give users fine motor control. Now, a team of researchers and clinicians has developed a simple surgical technique that could lead to prosthetics that are almost as responsive as real limbs.“It’s a very clever model,” says Melanie Urbanchek, a muscle physiologist at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. “[It makes] use of what the body naturally has to offer.”The biggest barrier to lifelike limbs is that signals can no longer travel in an unbroken path from the brain to the limb and back. Scientists have developed several ways to bridge the gap. The simplest is to place electrodes on remaining muscle near the amputation site. For finer control, doctors can use severed nerves themselves to relay the signals, through electronic attachments. But when they aren’t rejected by nerve tissue, such attachments tend to receive weak signals. A stronger signal comes from attaching nerve endings to small muscle grafts that amplify the signal and relay it using electrodes. But even this method fails to take advantage of a simple biological solution for joint control: the pairing of agonistic and antagonistic muscles. When you contract your biceps to bend your elbow, for example, your triceps on the other side of the joint stretches, providing resistance and feedback. Together, such opposing muscle pairs let you fluidly adjust a limb’s force, position, and speed.last_img read more

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