Moyes: No news yet on Rooney

first_img Press Association Palace looked destined for relegation towards the end of 2013, but manager Tony Pulis has turned things around at the London club. Moyes has been impressed with what the former Stoke boss has done at Selhurst Park. “A lot of people were writing Tony off during his time at Stoke City but he hasn’t half gone in there and made a few people eat their words,” Moyes added. “Results are what matter and you have to think about where Crystal Palace were and where they are now. What matters to Tony is results and he’s very good at getting them.” Palace could do with a morale-boosting win against United given that they are two points above the relegation zone. But Moyes is acutely aware that he needs to get back to winning ways after falling behind in the race for the top four with a 0-0 draw against Arsenal last week. That draw left United 11 points behind fourth-placed Liverpool with 12 matches left. When asked whether he thought his team could make the top four, the former Everton manager said: “We have to try, don’t we? We have to try to get as close as we can and see if we can put some pressure on the teams above us.” Like the speculation over Rooney, Moyes gave little away regarding team news for United’s trip to London. Midfielder Marouane Fellaini has been out since the start of December with a series of injuries while Rafael suffered concussion at Arsenal. Moyes would not divulge any information about the fitness of his players though ahead of the club’s games against Palace and Olympiacos next Tuesday. “Every club has players with injuries and we have the same,” Moyes added. “I’ll take all the players and hopefully prepare everybody for both games.” A five-day warm-weather training camp has done much to boost the spirit in the squad ahead of the team’s run-in. “It was great that we had some time together with the players,” Moyes said. “It’s the first time I’ve really had the chance to have a few days with the lads. “We trained, we had some relaxation time as well, so it was good. “You hope you get some benefit from it. I’m sure it will benefit the players, having the chance to relax. “We’d have rather been in the FA Cup, but we weren’t so the next thing we have to do is get them ready for the 12 remaining games.” David Moyes on Friday remained tight-lipped about claims that Wayne Rooney has signed a new contract with Manchester United. Speculation has been rife that Rooney has signed a new five-and-a-half-year deal, but the United boss was giving nothing away during his pre-match press conference at the club’s training ground. “As soon as we have the information to give you, we will give you it,” Moyes said when asked about contract negotiations with the England striker. Moyes does hope a deal for the player will be concluded soon, though. The Scot added: “Everyone knows how important a player he is. He is a terrific football player and if we can get it done that will be great.” Rooney has been in contract negotiations with United for some time now and Press Association Sport understands considerable progress has been made in the last few days. It is understood Rooney agreed the outline of a contract worth £300,000 earlier this week. But if any formal signing or announcement was imminent on Friday, Moyes was hiding it well. In fact, the United boss was far from happy to talk about the matter. After repeated questioning about Rooney, Moyes said: “I’d only be repeating myself again (if I answered) your question.” Moyes was determined to focus on Saturday’s Barclays Premier League game against Crystal Palace rather than talk in depth about Rooney. last_img read more

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“Don’t just issue reminders, prosecute them” – economist advises

first_imgNon-cambio businesses trading in US dollars…says this is the only “practical” way of addressing the issueAmid concerns that Guyana could continue to lose foreign exchange earnings especially since local businesses are not abiding by Bank of Guyana (BoG) Act 1998 by trading US dollars, outspoken economist Ramon Gaskin is urging Government to implement the law.Gaskin said that there would be no specific crackdown on businesses by issuing basic reminders in the media. He believes the only way the issue could be fixed is by ensuring that people are persecuted.The BoG recently issued a statement expressing its concern that some businesses are accepting foreign currency for the purpose of settling payments for transactions, instead of Guyana dollars.“That’s all they are doing. I don’t see it as a clampdown. A lot of people are violating the Act by trading in foreign currency; especially along Regent Street, youEconomist Ramon Gaskincan buy goods and pay in foreign dollars,” he said.The statement said, “The Bank wishes to advise that pursuant to section (20) of the Bank of Guyana Act, 1998, all monetary obligations or transactions in Guyana shall be settled in Guyana dollars.”The Bank reminded also that only banks and licensed cambios were authorised to conduct buying and selling of foreign currencies while noting that penalties were attached for violations which include fines and imprisonment.“The Bank warns that any person contravening the Bank of Guyana Act 1998 and the Dealers in Foreign Currency (Licensing) Act 1989 will be prosecuted,” the notice added.According to the BoG Act 1998, the Bank from time to time, by notice in writing, could demand from any person any financial information on foreign transactions. The BoG may require such persons to submit the information to the Bank, but if they fail to supply the information within the time specified or it is wilfully or recklessly withheld, they shall be guilty of an offence and shall be liable upon summary conviction to a fine of not more than $175,000 for each day the offence continues.However, Gaskin said, “But what the central bank needs to do is prosecute people who are violating the law. Prosecute them! Not put a big statement in the newspaper, because they are not going to read it.”The former presidential advisor told <<>> on Sunday that a lot of the funds that are received by the traders are kept in foreign currency and are not deposited in the banking system.“They are probably taken outside of the country and exported. And that is part of the capital flight problem that we are also faced with in this country…all the monies the Cubans are paying,” he added.This is also contributing to the reduction in the foreign reserves of the country.He said that if this continued to happen, the country would have to keep borrowing. The Government, he said, will also continue borrowing in foreign currency to help meet the deficit and trade accounts.“You have to pay for fuel in foreign currency. We have reduced earnings from the export of sugar, and, therefore, the Government will have to keep borrowing all the time to cover the deficit in the trade accounts, because we already have a big deficit on the current account, because we are spending more than we are taking in, and we have a deficit on the capital accounts,” he posited.Gaskin continued, “So, we operating three deficits here: the current, capital and trade. And once you keep doing that, you will be borrowing all the time. Guyana is borrowing all the time. We have been doing that for the past 40 years uninterrupted, since 1992 when we inherited a US$2 billion debt and a lot of it written off…and we keep borrowing – again US$1.6 billion in debt, both domestic and external.”With the recent influx of foreign shoppers into Guyana, Chinese businesses have been receiving enormous sales and have been engaged in trading US dollars. This is something that the BoG said it is aware of because it has had complaints in that regard. The BoG has also said this is lending to the issue and has cautioned these businesses to desist from it, as it plans to investigate thoroughly.Only last year, the BoG also issued a notice to unauthorised money changers warning them that if they continue to ply their illicit trade and are caught, they would face the full extent of prosecution under the Dealers in Foreign Currency (Licensing) Act 1989. Their trade came into the spotlight again after shortages of foreign currency saw them hiking their rates last year. (Samuel Sukhnandan)last_img read more

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