Former Gold Coast display home now up for grabs

first_img17 Elvire St, Ormeau Hills. 17 Elvire St, Ormeau Hills. 17 Elvire St, Ormeau Hills.It sits on a 400sq m elevated block, which makes the most of the hills views.A combined kitchen, living and dining area is at the heart of the home, which opens up onto an outdoor entertaining deck through floor-to-ceiling stacking glass doors.A media room and study are also on the ground floor.The second level is dedicated to five bedrooms as well as a family living area.It also has a double garage. 17 Elvire St, Ormeau Hills.center_img 17 Elvire St, Ormeau Hills.More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa18 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag2 days agoWhile it was built in 2015, marketing agent Jenni Wright, of Lucy Cole Prestige, said it was yet to be lived in so it was basically a brand new house.She said the two-storey home was ideal for buyers wanting plenty of space with a low-maintenance lifestyle.“It’s got a really nice feel when you walk in,” Mrs Wright said.“The entry is really nice, it has a beautiful, quality kitchen and it’s got a nice view to the hills.“It would suit someone scaling down, a young family or an investor.” 17 Elvire St, Ormeau Hills.NEUTRAL tones with splashes of wood, glass and stone give this Ormeau Hills home a modern elegance.The former display home at 17 Elvire St showcases contemporary living at its best with an open floorplan and minimalist style.last_img read more

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Labour’s goal of a safer society doomed to fail

first_imgKiwiBlog 24 February 2018Family First Comment: Excellent commentary by ex-ACT MP David Garratt….“The first thing Labour needs to change is the common leftie perception that most prisoners are hapless boys who have had  one lamentable lapse – a sudden mad or drugged urge to commit an aggravated robbery perhaps. The reality is very different. The average prisoner has 46 convictions – yes you read that right – forty six , and has served the gamut of non-custodial sentences before finally being incarcerated. Of the 5% who have less than five convictions, they will invariably be in prison for murder or a very serious assault….”“….In my view there are  only two ways to achieve the safer society that Little says he wants. First and best would be to stop pretending that every form of  whanau is equal, and admit  that a stable two parent family is best for society. To acknowledge that there is in fact a universal moral code to which all civil societies subscribe – the ten commandments contain the main elements of it: not stealing from ones fellows; not bashing or killing them; recognizing that  parents are in a better position than some 14 year old punk to decide what is and isn’t  good  for that young person. Sadly, despite the efforts of groups like Family First, such a change is most unlikely.”Andrew Little has said  he is utterly committed to creating a safer New Zealand – a laudable  goal, but one which he simply cannot achieve given Labour’s present assumptions about offending and penal policy. His colleague Kelvin Davis wants to  reduce the prison population by 30% – impossible unless we release those convicted of violent offences. Some leftie claimed  on National Radio the other day that the jails are “full of people convicted of cannabis offences”. This is a myth.  In fact, only 12% of the prison population are there for drug offences, the vast majority of them for manufacturing, distributing  or importing P. None  are in jail for possession of cannabis.The first thing Labour needs to change is the common leftie perception that most prisoners are hapless boys who have had  one lamentable lapse – a sudden mad or drugged urge to commit an aggravated robbery perhaps. The reality is very different. The average prisoner has 46 convictions – yes you read that right – forty six , and has served the gamut of non-custodial sentences before finally being incarcerated. Of the 5% who have less than five convictions, they will invariably be in prison for murder or a very serious assault.Do-gooders like Workman like to mock people like me by suggesting that we have an unreasoning and irrational  fear of a mythical  “Other”; that those in jail are really pretty much ordinary people, just like the rest of us. While this picture may have been at least partly true 50 years ago, it is emphatically not so today. By and large, prison inmates are  fundamentally different from the rest of us. They are people who  have not only utterly  rejected, but laugh at the principles by which most of the rest of us try to live: not to steal from or beat up our fellows; not to take advantage of the weak; to try and help the vulnerable, or at least not to do them further harm. They are indeed “The Other”, and we justifiably fear them.How did we get here?  By two main routes in my view: firstly by abandoning the idea of a universal moral code to which all decent members of society should subscribe, evidenced by the decline both  of organized religion, and the  ideal of service above self.  All the members of Bomber Command in WW II – of whom 30% never returned – were volunteers. Does anyone really imagine that would happen today?We declared two generations ago that the “ordinary” nuclear family of Mum Dad and the kids was no better than any other family – or whanau, as it is now. We declared that society had no business criticising a solo mum with five kids to three different fathers – a whanau that may have utterly different values to the mainstream. And we have reaped the consequences of that foolishness.READ MORE: https://www.kiwiblog.co.nz/2018/02/guest_post_labours_goal_of_a_safer_society_doomed_to_fail_unless_there_is_a_radical_re-think.htmlKeep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more

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‘Dagyang sa Calle Real’ a resounding success – IFFI

first_imgForeign visitors join the merry-making with the energized warriors of various ati-ati tribes during the first-ever “Dagyang sa Calle Real” on the stretch of Iloilo City’s Calle Real (JM Basa Street) on Saturday. IAN PAUL CORDERO/PN The revelry culminated in thereligious sadsad that began at theSan Jose de Placer Parish Church in front of Plaza Libertad, capping off thenine-day prayer for intentions (novena)through the intercession of patron saint Señor Sto. Niño. Led by the Cofradiadel Sto. Niño de Cebu – Iloilo City Chapter, the grand religious sadsad during the Dinagyang Festival isa devotional celebration of faith and supplication * Ilonggo Food Festival – Jan. 23 to 26 Iloilo Festivals Foundation, Inc.president Joebert Peñaflorida said the celebration was a huge success, citing thebarangay-based tribes’ glorious return on the Dinagyang stage after anear-decade out of the limelight. Nine tribes participated in themerry-making and street dancing which include Familia Sagrada (RoxasVillage/Osmeña); Angola (Bolilao); Kanyao (Quintin Salas); Hamili (Ortiz);Pana-ad (Ortiz); Annipay (Don Sebastian); Molave (Rizal Estanzuela); Familia Sagasa(Sto. Rosario, Duran); and Parianon (Boulevard).  The inaugural Dagyang sa Calle Real hasbeen deemed a “friendly competition” by the Iloilo Festivals Foundation, Inc.(IFFI), with awards for Darling of the Crowd, Best in Costume, and Best in Performanceset to be handed out after the event. Each of the tribes received a P300,000subsidy. Dinagyang is the Hiligaynon word forrevelry or merrymaking. The festival is Iloilo City’s version of the Ati-Atihancelebrations widely observed not only in Panay Island but also in other partsof the country. It may not be as ancient as the one in Kalibo, Aklan but it isknown more for its participants’ impressive choreography and striking costumesthat reflect the ingenuity, craftsmanship and artistry of the Ilonggos./PN “Angaton kapulisan and enforcers ang indi pa man gid naka-intindi nga ang Dagyang sa Calle Real is participative. So, initially may gamay nga concern samga lubid pero ini ang na-addresswithin the first hour kay ang purposesang religious event is tananmag-upod indi nga lantawon naton kundi updan,” added Peñaflorida. * Floats Parade of Lights – Jan. 24 * Miss Iloilo 2020 – Jan. 24 * Religious sadsad – Jan. 25 * Fluvial and solemnfoot procession – Jan. 24 Since it was newly introduced to thepublic, Peñaflorida said the event encountered some minor “discomfort,” citingsome police officers and security enforcers who used ropes to control the crowdaround the venue. But this was readily remedied. center_img * Fireworks display – Jan. 24 Peñaflorida is hoping that Dinagyangwill reach its 25,000 target revelers as the IFFI lined up myriad ofactivities. “This is the first time re-intruding sang Dagyang sa Calle Real kag kita nalipay sa mainit nga pagbaton sangmga Ilonggo kag bisita sa aton mga nagkalain-lain nga tribu,” Peñafloridatold Panay News. * Dinagyang 360° – Jan. 26 * Iloilo Dinagyang Art Festival – Jan.18 to 25 * Tambor Trumpa Martsa Musika – Jan. 24 * Dinagyang sa Calle Real – Jan. 25 The following are the IFFI Dinagyang2020 events: * Festive Parade Sponsors Mardi Gras –Jan. 25 Peñaflorida also invited everyone tojoin the highlight of this year’s festivity with the theme “Perfect Vision:Celebrating the Ilonggo Spirit in Honor of Señor Sto. Niño.”    ILOILO – Yesterday’s pioneering“Dagyang sa Calle Real” was a triumphant kickoff leading to this year’sDinagyang Festival highlight, dominating the City Proper’s most iconic stretchof JM Basa Street. last_img read more

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