News story: Fly-tipping: New measures in government fight against waste crime

first_imgHouseholders have a legal ‘duty of care’ to ensure they only give their waste to a licensed carrier. Today (26 November), new financial penalties of up to £400 for householders who fail to properly exercise this responsibility, and whose waste is found fly-tipped, have moved a step closer as legislation is laid in Parliament.Potential fly-tipping by rogue operators, and the risk of a penalty, can be simply avoided by using certified waste carriers, which can be checked easily by visiting the Environment Agency’s website, where you can enter the business name or registration number to immediately confirm their status as an approved company.The government has also issued guidance to ensure councils use these new powers proportionately and make clear fines should not be used as a means of raising revenue. To strike the right balance householders should not be fined for minor breaches, and the guidance also stresses that consideration should be given if the individual is a vulnerable person due to age related ill-health or a mental or physical disability.The new penalties, which are expected to come into force early next year, will make it easier for councils to tackle fly-tipping and provide an alternative to putting cases through the courts which can be a lengthy and costly process.In 2016-17 clearing up fly-tipping incidents cost councils in England £57.7 million, with around two thirds of all fly-tipped waste containing household waste.Latest figures show our tough actions to crack down on fly-tippers are delivering results, with no increase in the number of incidents for the first time in five years.Environment minister Thérèse Coffey said: To tackle the potential over-zealous enforcement on households, in 2015 the Government removed criminal penalties for breaches of household bin requirements in favour of a new civil penalty system.Councils were urged to use letters or notices on bins to remind households of appropriate practices, and this measured and balanced approach, set out in further guidance produced earlier this year, continues to allow councils to focus their efforts on the small minority who cause genuine harm to the local environment through irresponsible behaviour.Today’s move comes as the government publishes the response to its consultation on tackling poor performance in the waste sector more widely. New measures include a requirement for all waste facilities to have a written management plan to minimise the risks of pollution to the environment, and making it harder for applicants with relevant past offences to obtain a permit to operate a waste facility.The involvement of serious and organised criminal gangs in the waste sector appears to be increasing, and these gangs are often involved in large-scale dumping. Environment Secretary Michael Gove recently commissioned an independent review into organised crime in the waste sector. Recommendations from the review will be considered as part of the forthcoming Resources and Waste Strategy where we will set out our approach to tackling all forms of waste crime.Further information: We support local partners through the National Fly-Tipping Prevention Group (NFTPG) which has published a series of fly-tipping prevention guides for householders, businesses and landowners, outlining best practice for the prevention, reporting, investigation and clearance of fly-tipping. 88% of councils agreed a new fixed penalty notice would help tackle fly-tipping. A waste facility is any site with a permit to handle, treat, or store waste. Examples include recycling centres, tyre processors, and vehicle wreckers. Last year councils issued 69,000 on-the-spot fines for fly-tipping offences. Fly-tipping is an unacceptable blight on our landscapes. Many people do not realise they have a legal duty to look up waste carriers and we want councils to step up and inform their residents. We must all take responsibility and make sure our waste does not end up in the hands of criminals who will wilfully dump it and these new powers will help us to crack down on rogue waste carriers.last_img read more

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Texas topples Troy in Rose Bowl

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECoach Doc Rivers a “fan” from way back of Jazz’s Jordan Clarkson 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! PASADENA, Calif. (AP) – Vince Young and Texas are second no more to Southern California and its Heisman Trophy twins, Reggie Bush and Matt Leinart. With the national championship down to a final play, Young scrambled for an 8-yard touchdown on fourth down with 19 seconds left and the No. 2 Longhorns stunned the top-ranked Trojans 41-38 in the Rose Bowl on Wednesday night. The high-scoring game everyone expected to see broke out in the second half _ yet it was a defensive stop that was the key for Texas. The Longhorns stuffed LenDale White on a fourth-and-2 at midfield with 2:09 left, giving them a final chance. Young, bitterly disappointed at losing the Heisman to Bush, wound up with the ultimate revenge. On a night when he ran for 200 yards and passed for 267 more, he capped a performance that Texas fans will remember forever by scoring the final TD and running for a 2-point conversion. “It’s so beautiful,” Young said as he received the MVP crystal. “Don’t you think that’s beautiful? It’s coming home all the way to Austin, Texas.” With the two highest scoring teams in the country, many figured it would come down to which team had the ball last. Almost. Trying for its unprecedented third straight title, USC crossed midfield one more time. But on the last play of the game, Leinart’s pass sailed high over Dwayne Jarrett’s head around the 25 and USC’s 34-game winning streak was over. Texas players streamed onto the field with the Longhorns’ first outright national title since 1969. Young stood on the sideline in a sea of falling confetti, arms raised toward the crowd, and senior tackle William Winston unfurled a big, white Longhorns flag. The Longhorns (13-0) won their 20th in a row, overcoming the 38-26 lead USC (12-1) held with 4 1/2 minutes left. USC players looked startled. Some put their hands to their heads, others took off their helmets. “Well, we couldn’t stop them when we had to,” USC coach Pete Carroll said. “The quarterback ran all over the place. “This is their night,” he said. “It’s wonderful doing what we’ve been doing. We didn’t get it done.” Said Leinart: “I still think we’re a better football team, they just made the plays in the end.” last_img read more

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