CULTURAL CLEANSING By Jim Redwine

first_img Gavel Gamut By Jim Redwinewww.jamesmredwine.com)CULTURAL CLEANSINGA nation is its culture and experience, its history. That is what determines its character. The same is true of the world. We learn or do not learn from the mistakes and accomplishments of ourselves and those who have preceded us. If we learn, we can accomplish more. If we do not learn, we may repeat mistakes. To learn from the past we must know and understand it. If we hide the past, we do not change what has happened but we may live to regret that we no longer remember it.ISIS or ISIL, the Islamic State of Iraq or the Islamic State of Syria, has been culturally cleansing the ancient Middle East for several years. Its members are offended by statues, monuments and artifacts that once, before ISIS destroyed them, carried within them thousands of years of human knowledge and culture. ISIS could not bear to allow memories of ancient or even contemporary peoples who had the temerity to have different beliefs from ISIS. This is particularly puzzling with religious differences since ISIS’s belief system is based on its particular interpretation of Islam which could not have existed before Mohammad who lived from 570 A.D. to 632 A.D. Yet ISIS viciously attacks the artifacts and history of cultures thousands of years old.Of course, ISIS as all such denigrators of history, is not changing the facts of history. ISIS is merely proving their own ignorance of it. Such actions are much as children who put their hands over their eyes or duck their heads under the covers in an attempt to convince themselves that because they do not see something it never existed. Or as ISIS and some other people do, they destroy historical artifacts and try to convince themselves and others that a certain history never happened. Of greater concern is the very real possibility their actions will lead to the loss by future generations of an opportunity to learn from that history.To preserve and observe a historical artifact, a temple to Baal that was 5,000 years old or a Christian church that was 2,000 years old for example, is not to worship Baal or Jesus but is to build upon and learn from history. To destroy artifacts of a nation’s past does not change that past but it may result in the nation repeating past errors because those errors are out of sight and therefore out of mind.History teaches us that power waxes and wanes and that who is on top today may be oppressed tomorrow. The burning or banning of books, say the Bible for example, does not invalidate a book’s content. It does validate the lack of vision of those who arrogate to themselves the sole interpretation of truth or history.Each of us has the right to venerate or denigrate whatever philosophy, religion or creed we wish. However, just because what happened in history may be offensive to us does not mean we should attempt to establish such history never occurred. Haven’t we lived through enough of such culture destroying behavior to recognize the danger in such a course?Perhaps next week we can revisit such a revision of history that occurred right here in Posey County, Indiana and delve into what that revision might mean to us today.For more Gavel Gamut articles go to:www.jamesmredwine.comA nation is its culture and experience, its history. That is what determines its character. The same is true of the world. We learn or do not learn from the mistakes and accomplishments of ourselves and those who have preceded us. If we learn, we can accomplish more. If we do not learn, we may repeat mistakes. To learn from the past we must know and understand it. If we hide the past, we do not change what has happened but we may live to regret that we no longer remember it.ISIS or ISIL, the Islamic State of Iraq or the Islamic State of Syria, has been culturally cleansing the ancient Middle East for several years. Its members are offended by statues, monuments and artifacts that once, before ISIS destroyed them, carried within them thousands of years of human knowledge and culture. ISIS could not bear to allow memories of ancient or even contemporary peoples who had the temerity to have different beliefs from ISIS. This is particularly puzzling with religious differences since ISIS’s belief system is based on its particular interpretation of Islam which could not have existed before Mohammad who lived from 570 A.D. to 632 A.D. Yet ISIS viciously attacks the artifacts and history of cultures thousands of years old.Of course, ISIS as all such denigrators of history, is not changing the facts of history. ISIS is merely proving their own ignorance of it. Such actions are much as children who put their hands over their eyes or duck their heads under the covers in an attempt to convince themselves that because they do not see something it never existed. Or as ISIS and some other people do, they destroy historical artifacts and try to convince themselves and others that a certain history never happened. Of greater concern is the very real possibility their actions will lead to the loss by future generations of an opportunity to learn from that history.To preserve and observe a historical artifact, a temple to Baal that was 5,000 years old or a Christian church that was 2,000 years old for example, is not to worship Baal or Jesus but is to build upon and learn from history. To destroy artifacts of a nation’s past does not change that past but it may result in the nation repeating past errors because those errors are out of sight and therefore out of mind.History teaches us that power waxes and wanes and that who is on top today may be oppressed tomorrow. The burning or banning of books, say the Bible for example, does not invalidate a book’s content. It does validate the lack of vision of those who arrogate to themselves the sole interpretation of truth or history.Each of us has the right to venerate or denigrate whatever philosophy, religion or creed we wish. However, just because what happened in history may be offensive to us does not mean we should attempt to establish such history never occurred. Haven’t we lived through enough of such culture destroying behavior to recognize the danger in such a course?Perhaps next week we can revisit such a revision of history that occurred right here in Posey County, Indiana and delve into what that revision might mean to us today.For more Gavel Gamut articles go to:www.jamesmredwine.comFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Serena Teluwo, Chidinma Ezeh Show Great Promise at Chevron Tennis Masters

first_imgIn other round-robin matches, the number one seed in the Boys 16s, Seun ‘Nadal’ Ogunsakin, has one leg in the semifinals with easy victories over Mohamed Idris of Abuja 9-2 and Praise Ikueba of Rivers State 9-3.The second seed, Precious Ikueba, twin brother of Praise, is also on course for the semifinals with hard-fought wins against Emmanuel Ameh of Lagos 9-5 and Lucky Danjuma of Abuja 9-6.The round-robin matches are to be completed today with semifinal matches taking place on Saturday. The grand finale will follow on Sunday starting at 13.00 hrs.The Chevron Junior Tennis Invitational Masters taking place at the Lagos Lawn Tennis Club, Race Course is being organised by the International Tennis Academy.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram Two 14 year-olds – Serena Teluwo from Lagos and Chidinma Ezeh from Anambra – who are stepping up to play in the 16 age group showed outstanding skill and promise yesterday in their second round-robin match against the second and third seeds respectively at the Chevron Junior Tennis Invitational Masters taking place at the Lagos Lawn Tennis Club.Teluwo, who blew a 7-2 lead against Peace Obabori in her first round-robin match eventually losing 8-9, came back really focused and determined against Omolade Aderemi, the second seed in the Girls 16 but still went down 6-9 in the pro-set match.Ezeh also pushed the third seed, Favour Moses from Kaduna, hard. The emerging star from Onitsha broke the hard-hitting Moses twice at the beginning but failed to convert her game points to consolidate her lead. Her opponent eventually found her range to win the match 9-5.last_img read more

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Trojans close out regular season at home

first_imgMen’s swimming ends regular season Saturday vs. Utah.Turning it around · Sophomore Vladimir Morozov is hoping to get the Trojans back to their winning ways. The team has lost two straight meets. – Photo courtesy of USC Sports InformationAfter a pair of tough losses to No. 6 California and No. 3 Stanford, USC’s No. 5-ranked men’s swimming and diving team (3-3, 1-3) will end its dual meet season at home against Pac-12 rival Utah (5-5, 1-2) Saturday at noon.The Trojan squad is led by a plethora of All-Americans, including sophomores Vladimir Morozov and Dimitri Colupaev, junior Alex Lendrum and senior Jeff Daniels. Morozov currently holds the nation’s top times in the 50- and 100-yard backstroke, with Colupaev leading the nation in the 200-yard freestyle. Lendrum is ranked second in the 200-yard backstroke, and freshman Chad Bobrosky ranks ninth in the 200-yard freestyle.The Utes are coming off a tough loss to rival BYU. Junior Ryan Hansen won the 500-yard and 1,000-yard freestyle, and senior Major Robinson and junior Austin Fiascone finished first and second in the 200-yard backstroke, respectively. They were originally scheduled to host the meet in Salt Lake City but moved it to USC in order to check out the facility where the Pac-12 championships will be held.The meet is also the final home event for seniors Daniels, Julian Bonse, Will Orlady and co-captain Jack Ostler. After this, the teams will prepare for the Pac-12 championships in Long Beach from Feb. 29-Mar. 3, followed by the NCAA championships qualifiers, which begin March 8.last_img read more

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