Moog Speaks Out On Trump Tariffs, Fears For Their Effect On U.S. Synth Manufacturing

first_imgRecently, synthesizer manufacturer Moog Music Inc. has denounced the 25% tariffs on Chinese electrical circuit boards and components by U.S. President Trump, which will take effect on July 6th. The company has noted that the tariff will increase the cost of building a synthesizer, putting the company at a disadvantage against other international manufacturers and threatening jobs among U.S. synth makers. With many U.S. companies priding themselves on being made in the U.S., those companies may be forced to relocate outside the country or have the bulk of their production done in China.As noted by Moog, 50% of all the components with a Moog synthesizer are from China. With such a high percentage of components coming directly from China—and therefore subject to the new tariffs—it’s easy to see why Moog and other U.S. synth companies will struggle to stay competitive with the tariffs enacted. Immediately, the tariffs could cause layoffs and force individual businesses like Moog to fold. In the long term, the tariffs could threaten the viability of production of U.S.-made synthesizers. These tariffs will not affect completed synthesizers that were fully made in China and exported to the U.S.Recently, the North Carolina-based company posted an open letter on its website, calling for fans and customers to speak out against the tariffs and write to state representatives to convey their opposition. As they explained,We need your help. A U.S. tariff (import tax) on Chinese circuit boards and associated components is expected to take effect on July 6, 2018.These tariffs will immediately and drastically increase the cost of building our instruments, and have the very real potential of forcing us to lay off workers and could (in a worst case scenario) require us to move some, if not all, of our manufacturing overseas.There is one thing all of us can do together to try and stop this: Write to our elected officials.They also attached a fully written form letter for advocates to use, which notes that Moog synthesizers have been used by Michael Jackson, The Beatles, Radiohead, Stevie Wonder, and many others. You can check out the full form letter below, and head to Moog’s website here for full instructions on how to get involved.Dear (Congressman or Representative):I am writing you on behalf of Moog Music, a company of 100 employee-owners, based in Asheville, North Carolina. I am urgently contacting you about the recently announced 25% tariff on Chinese goods.In case you are not familiar with Moog, they manufacture the world’s leading analog synthesizers used by artists including but not limited to Michael Jackson,The Beatles, Radiohead, Stevie Wonder and many others.Roughly half of the circuit boards and associated components for Moog’s instruments come from China. This tariff would significantly limit their ability to manufacture synthesizers, and could put many of their employee-owners out of a job.As an employee-owned company with a 60-year legacy in American manufacturing, Moog constantly strives to keep a balance between domestically- and internationally-sourced parts, so that they can continue employing people from their local community in Asheville, North Carolina.Moog sources circuit boards from US suppliers whenever possible, paying up to 30% over the price of the same circuit boards made overseas. However, whether they buy circuit boards in the US or overseas, the majority of the raw components still come from China. Therefore, Moog will be unable to avoid this substantial cost increase because of the tariffs.These tariffs will immediately and drastically increase the cost of building Moog instruments, forcing them to lay off American workers and will require Moog to move some, if not all, of their manufacturing overseas.I do not want to see the end of Moog’s 60-year legacy in American manufacturing. I do not want  their employee-owners left without jobs. I want American workers to continue have the opportunity to support their families and their community.I implore you to convince the President that these Chinese tariffs cause serious damage to American workers like those at Moog and to rescind them immediately.Thank you,(Your Name)[H/T Ask Audio]last_img read more

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Hammers exit for Cole

first_img “The Hammers have confirmed that senior professionals Carlton Cole, Guy Demel, Jussi Jaaskelainen and Nene will all leave the club at the end of their contracts on 30 June,” read a statement on the club’s official website. “Young professionals Kieran Bywater, Sean Maguire, Paul McCallum and Dan Potts will also depart the Boleyn Ground after not being offered new contracts. “Scholars Jerry Amoo and Kieran Bailey have been released, while Taylor Tombides will also be moving on. “Meanwhile, youngsters Kyle Knoyle, Djair Parfitt-Williams and Alex Pike have agreed their first professional deals with the club and will sign contracts from 1 July. “The club would like to thank all the departing players for their efforts and wish them well in their future careers.” Cole was let go by the Hammers in the summer of 2013 but rejoined the club on a short-term deal five months later before penning an 18-month contract in January 2014. He began his career at Chelsea and had spells on loan at Wolves, Charlton and Aston Villa before moving to east London in the summer of 2006. The 31-year-old, who has seven England caps, made 23 appearances for West Ham last season, scoring against Crystal Palace and Burnley before seeing a move to West Brom collapse in January. Carlton Cole heads the list of players leaving West Ham this summer after being released by the club for the second time in two years. “I’ve been at West Ham United for quite a long time and I’ve enjoyed myself here, with all the ups and downs, the heartaches and everything that came along with it,” he said in a letter on the club website. “At the same time, I’ve grown from being a boy to a man here and everybody has treated me like a part of the family. “It is heart-warming to know that I have got such support and that I have done my fair share for the club and been part of the history as well, which is very important for me. “I’m very happy to have been a part of it and, wherever my future may lie, West Ham will always have a special place in my heart. “It means a lot to me to have been at West Ham for so long. I wouldn’t like to use the word hero, but I have played my part. A load of players have come and gone, but I’ve stayed around and enjoyed every minute of it.” Jaaskelainen joined the Hammers in 2012 and was first choice in his first season at Upton Park before being edged out by Adrian the following campaign. Defender Demel spent four seasons with West Ham after signing from Hamburg in 2011 while forward Nene joined on a short-term deal in February. Manager Sam Allardyce left the club on Sunday after it was decided his contract would not be renewed and now striker Cole will follow him out the door when his contract expires on June 30 alongside veteran goalkeeper Jussi Jaaskelainen, Guy Demel and Nene. Young players Kieran Bywater, Sean Maguire, Paul McCallum and Dan Potts will also leave Upton Park while youth-team players Jerry Amoo, Kieran Bailey and Taylor Tombides have not been retained. Press Associationlast_img read more

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Wisconsin men’s soccer team loses 7th straight contest

first_imgThe Wisconsin men’s soccer team (4-9-0, 0-3-0) lost a tough second-half battle Friday night at the hands of two-time defending national champion Indiana (8-1-3, 2-1-1) 5-2. Despite heading into the break with the score tied 2-2, the Badgers could not shut down the No. 8 Hoosier arsenal in the second half.”[Indiana is] a good team,” Wisconsin head coach Jeff Rohrman said. “They’re obviously ranked where they are because of their performances and the team that they are. I’m happy that we could show them that we could compete for 45 minutes, but I’m also a little bit disappointed that we couldn’t compete for the whole 90 minutes.”Indiana opened the scoring with a questionable penalty call in the 15th minute. After a low cross was sent in from the right flank, junior striker Jacob Peterson was slightly taken down just outside of the six-yard box, resulting in a Hoosier penalty kick.Freshman forward Lee Nguyen stepped up and secured the lead for Indiana with a clinical finish into the lower left corner.Six minutes later the Badgers responded with a penalty kick of their own following some clever footwork on the right channel by redshirt freshman Victor Diaz.Following several stepovers, the Spaniard lofted the ball onto the foot of sophomore Sho Fujita, who was viciously tripped up eight yards from goal. Diaz sent Indiana keeper Chris Munroe the wrong way and slotted home the equalizer from the spot.It didn’t take the Hoosiers long to regain the lead, however, as senior midfielder Brian Plotkin answered just four minutes later with a swerving 30-yard blast into the right side of the net with his left foot. The goal marked Plotkin’s fifth of the season.Wisconsin’s bench provided a huge spark for the Badgers going into halftime when substitute Nick Caronna whipped in a cross onto the head of fellow substitute Matthew Jelacic. Jelacic then flicked the ball right onto the path of a streaking Reid Johnson who was able to hammer the ball past Munroe into the lower left corner to tie the game in the 43rd minute.After scoring only one goal in their past five matches, the Badger players knew the scoring had to come eventually, and they were all delighted to break the slump.”It felt really good,” Johnson said of his goal. “I’ve just come off of an injury, so it was just exciting to be out there and playing at full strength again. I knew we were going to score tonight because we’ve been struggling lately and everyone’s been really busting it at practice — I think everybody knew we were going to score today.”Unfortunately for Wisconsin, the scoring surge ended at two and the Badger goal was the target of a Hoosier offensive assault throughout the entire second half.In the 52nd minute, Indiana defender Greg Stevning sent a defense-splitting through pass to Jacob Peterson who needed only to cut past Wisconsin keeper Jake Settle for the game-winning goal. Six minutes later, Peterson scored his seventh of the season and second of the match making it 4-2.Indiana’s Jordan Chirico rounded out the scoring for the Hoosiers in the 64th minute of play.Although Rohrman was thrilled with the return of goalscoring for the team, he was also frustrated with the team’s defensive breakdown in the second half.”I thought in the second half, for whatever reason, we just didn’t put it together,” Rohrman said. “We gave them too many soft goals tonight. I thought the last one that Chirico scored was a good goal, but aside from that, I thought they were goals that we gave up instead of making them earn them.”While the defeat marks the seventh-straight loss for the Badgers, Rohrman and his squad are not worrying about the past, but are instead preparing for their next match Wednesday with Marquette University.”In college soccer, you can’t dwell on one game or one setback,” Rohrman said. “We’ve struggled a little bit finding the goal, and now tonight we got two, so we should feel good about that. I thought we created some good things going forward, so there are some positives to take from there and hopefully we can sure up some things on the defensive side and come out and play for 90 minutes on Wednesday.”last_img read more

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