CHANNEL 44 NEWS : Charges Will Not Be Filed Against 4 EPD Officers In…

first_imgCharges Will Not Be Filed Against 4 EPD Officers In Excessive Force CaseDECEMBER 8TH, 2016 CHELSEA KOERBLER EVANSVILLE, INDIANA The prosecutor’s office will not file any charges against the four EPD officers accused of using excessive force during an arrest in October.The officers, Mark Decamps, Marcus Craig, Nick Henderson, and Sergeant Kyle Kassel were suspended after allegedly using force while arresting Mark Healy. They filed documents saying Healy fought with them during his arrest, but the body camera footage shows that was not the case.Police Chief Billy Bolin recommended that Craig, Decamps, and Henderson be fired and Sergeant Kassel be demoted.Vanderburgh County Prosecutor Nick Hermann says his office will dismiss the charge of resisting arrest against Healy.Charges will not be filed against any of the officers involved in this case. The Police Merit Commission will determine if the officers will be terminated and demoted.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

Read more

Faculty host public Ferguson discussion

first_imgJason Ruiz, assistant professor of American Studies, and Dianne Pinderhughes, professor of political science and Africana Studies, hosted an open forum Monday on the recent events in Ferguson, Mo., to discuss the implications these events have on racial and societal issues.Ruiz said the forum’s timeliness supplemented discussions people should have in and out of the classroom.“I’m teaching this class, Mixed Race America, and I thought starting with Ferguson was an obvious place to start a critical exploration of race relations, and especially race relations,” Ruiz said. “I always start the class talking about ‘What is Race?’ and right now when we ask ourselves, ‘What is race?’ Ferguson is looming large in terms of the state of American race relations.”Ruiz said perceptions of race are often skewed because of media biases — something students in the social media age are especially susceptible to.“The one thing I hope we can do is demand better, more fair media portrayals,” Ruiz said. “That’s something I took away that we all had in common. My task as an educator is to create more savvy media consumers.”Ruiz said the open forum style of discussion was meant to facilitate more frank discussions on the topic of race on campus.“I think students have a lot to say, but they sometimes don’t feel empowered or like they have a critical space with faculty members to really tell us how they feel,” Ruiz said. “This is a campus that has a lot of students, faculty and staff people that are interested in issues like this and keeping the conversation going. Personally, I hope [the forum] will be the start of many conversations.”Pinderhughes said that the very fact the forum was open and without a formal presentation gave the faculty in attendance an opportunity to see what the students were thinking about the situation.“We were very pleased with the turnout and we had a very nice range of questions,” Pinderhughes said. “Seeing that not all the students were in agreement opened up a lot of different options for people to engage in action.”Senior Deandra Cadet said her peers posed educated inquiries and honed in on the issue’s relevance to the University.“A lot of people were talking about what was the next step for us that we can take to educate ourselves on these issues and also be advocates against the sort of actions that might be police brutality,” Cadet said. “I think it’s more just about what actions we can take as students.”Cadet said the public exchange of opinions and facts on Ferguson allowed students to explore how race affects them personally and facilitate the discussion of topics of equality in their own social circles.“I think having actual concrete conversations with different people about things that are important to your life can really bridge the gap, because you can know someone of a different race and not really know them or what’s important to them,” Cadet said.Tags: Ferguson, Race relationslast_img read more

Read more

Connacht lose again

first_img Connacht had suffered three successive losses since their opening-round win over Zebre and their hopes of ending that sequence in Treviso suffered an early blow when Paul O’Donohoe – making his first start of the season at scrum-half – was sin-binned just seven minutes in for hands in the ruck. Alberto Di Bernardo slotted over the resulting penalty to open the scoring and two more three-pointers from the Italy international saw the home side, who had lost just once at home in their last eight matches, leading 9-0 at the break. Parks, having missed his only penalty chance of the first half, reduced the deficit to 9-3 with a 51st-minute kick but within 60 seconds Benetton crossed for the first try when Zanni touched down. Tobias Botes added the extras to make it 16-3 and, although the home side lost Robert Barbieri to a yellow card in the 68th minute, Connacht could not capitalise and Benetton added another converted try through Morisi late on. Connacht slumped to their fourth defeat in five RaboDirectPro12 matches after going down 23-3 to fellow strugglers Benetton Treviso at the Stadio Monigo. Press Associationcenter_img Alessandro Zanni and Luca Morisi crossed for second-half tries for Benetton to seal a second win of the season for the Italian side, with Connacht’s only contribution to the scoreboard coming from Dan Parks’ penalty after the interval. The result leaves Connacht stuck in the bottom two of the standings on four points, the same as last-placed Edinburgh who are in action on Sunday. last_img read more

Read more

Analog Aging in a Digital World Part 2

first_imgby, Jeanette Leardi, ChangingAging ContributorTweetShareShareEmail0 SharesIn my most recent post, “Analog Aging in a Digital World,” I discussed “the benefits of adhering to a few analog ways of aging in the world, despite all the digital progress that’s been made” using these examples:Considering older adults as individuals rather than as memes or caricatures.Accepting aging as a natural process.Serving elders by using a person-centered rather than institutionalized approach.These values target healthy perceptions of aging and positive behaviors that arise from them. But there’s a bit more to be said about the benefits of taking analog approaches, especially while a person is young, years before entering older adulthood. Because everyone is aging, it’s smart to want to maintain a productive, quality life as long as possible and to accumulate the kind of social wisdom that comes with experience and a perspective that is honed over many years. In other words, everyone should aspire to be an elder in training. Therefore, why not anticipate that time of life by developing these analog habits early on?Appreciating silence. Our world is becoming more and more crowded with aural and visual noise: blaring music, ubiquitous advertisements, interrupting cross- conversations, superficial and/or strident cable and social media chatter. While these modern, digital situations are designed to convey information quickly, we often forget to question the necessity and quality of that information. Moreover, it seems as though we are losing the ability –– and desire –– to be comfortable with silence, to turn off our electronic devices and simply be in our environments, to really listen to someone else before speaking and to evaluate the level of truth of what we hear and say. Besides seeking freedom from distractions when focusing on tasks, elders often take great pleasure in savoring experiences for their intrinsic value, placing them in proper perspective. Not bad skills for elders in training to hone.Setting personal boundaries of information-sharing. One of the potential gifts of elderhood is the ability to be more discriminating, to know what is important and what is not in any given situation. While there have always been people of all ages who lack personal boundaries and have a compulsion to tell all about themselves or others, there is a growing ease bordering on recklessness regarding the desire to focus on self-important details and to constantly share those details with others. Taking selfies, tweeting, video messaging, texting, and sexting words and pictures are new technological ways of instantaneously updating the world about our lives. But often we don’t take into account that the Internet is an indelible medium and that there is a potential danger in posting personal information that can negatively affect our reputation, including the ability to get hired or keep a job. The question is: Do we gain more than we lose when we voluntarily give up our privacy and dignity to cyberspace on a global and permanent basis? It’s an analog question each of us at any age should ask and answer for ourselves.Making relationships mean something. Social isolation is one of the greatest health threats to older adults, not just because it can deny access to physical support but also because the loneliness and lack of opportunity to contribute to society can lead to depression. Fortunately, networking is one of the activities that the Internet has exponentially improved, and it can be an effective and empowering way to increase one’s presence and knowledge and to share one’s talents and services with others. That being said, it’s worth our while to understand that there are levels to intimacy and commitment, that “friending” thousands of people doesn’t make us popular or more cherished, and that by spending time casting our relationship nets too widely we might begin to neglect tending to relationships with those who are closest to us and whom we value the most. Using social media to keep in touch with family and real friends is a smart way to age in a digital world.These are analog issues that are simple and low-tech and reflect values that worked well in the past and can still apply today.Anyone, regardless of age, can embrace them.Related PostsAnalog Aging in a Digital WorldIt seems that as a society we keep throwing out the traditional baby with the bathwater every time a new cultural development occurs, just because it’s new. Here are a few examples of analog values we should retain that relate directly to aging.The Six Assets of AgingThe deterioration-decline meme that defines aging in our culture originates in a narrow perception of the lifespan that is blind to the priceless assets we accrue as we add years to our lives.What Are the Best Books on Aging?This week I received a guestblog submission from a wonderful ChangingAging reader who is writing a book on graceful aging and submitted a post listing her Top 15 Books onTweetShareShareEmail0 SharesTags: analog Elderhood Second Windlast_img read more

Read more