Five win Brooks Awards

first_imgBy Faith PeppersUniversity of GeorgiaFive University of Georgia faculty members received theprestigious D.W. Brooks Awards for Excellence Oct. 18 in Athens,Ga.The $5,000 annual awards recognize UGA College of Agriculturaland Environmental Sciences educators and researchers who excel inteaching, research, extension and public service extensionprograms. An award for international agriculture is given ineven-numbered years.The 2004 winners are JeffreyDorfman, teaching; PaulBertsch, research; BillHurst, extension; DebbiePurvis, public service extension programs; and JackHouston, international agriculture.The CAES sponsors the annual lecture and awards in memory of D.W.Brooks, founder of Gold Kist, Inc., and Cotton States MutualInsurance Companies.Mark Drabenstott, vice president and director of the Center forthe Study of Rural America at the Federal Reserve Bank of KansasCity, delivered the 2004 D.W. Brooks Lecture, “The Brave NewWorld for Land-grant Universities.”Dorfman,an outstanding teacher of agricultural and applied economics, hasreceived the department’s graduate teaching award in 1991 and1992 and undergraduate teaching award in 1998, 2001 and 2003.In 2004, he was presented the Southern Agricultural EconomicsAssociation Distinguished Teaching of a Course Award for hiscourse, “The Economics of Agricultural Processing and Marketing.”This course helps prepare students to work in food industry jobs.They learn to apply economic principles to real-world situations.The course prepares them to solve economic and managementproblems they will likely face in the food industry.Bertschis a professor of soil physical chemistry and mineralogy anddirector of the Savannah River Ecology Lab. His research onaluminum chemistry has improved scientists’ understanding of theelement’s role in soil chemistry and plant and animal toxicity.His extensive work on delineating the chemical speciation, ormolecular form of atoms, of environmental contaminants and onunderstanding the connection between chemical speciation and themobility, bioavailability and toxicity of contaminants is widelyrecognized as pioneering.It has provided the basis of a new research area now generallyknown as molecular environmental science.Hurst,an extension food scientist, has been a leader in developing foodsafety training and workshop materials for the fresh andfresh-cut produce industries for more than 20 years.His work with the Georgia Department of Agriculture and otherentities is recognized nationwide. He developed the Georgia State”Fresh Produce Safety Team” and the nation’s first GAPs (GoodAgricultural Practices) short course for the fresh produceindustry.Hurst’s Georgia GAPs Food Safety Program for Georgia producegrowers, packers and shippers program saved thousands of dollarsin third-party audit fees for the industry. It is a model forother states that are working to establish similar programs.Purvis,an extension agent in Colquitt County, is involved in projectssuch as “Smart Kids Fight BAC,” a multistate food safetycurriculum, and the Faculty Research Grant Pilot Study, a profileand needs assessment of the Latino migrant population.She has trained a bilingual staff and now offers food serviceemployees a state-required food handler certification training inboth Spanish and English.She led in procuring a grant for “Voz de la Familia,” afamily-centered community outreach program, and has taughtnutrition, food safety and chronic disease prevention to nearly1,000 Latino farm workers since 2002.Houstonhas taught agricultural and applied economics at UGA since 1984.Before that, he was a Peace Corps volunteer in Malawi and thenspent nine years with the Malawi Ministry of Agriculture. Hetrained more than 2,000 agricultural extension personnel and ledin planning and developing the curriculum of a new college ofnatural resources.At UGA, Houston has been the interim director of the Africanstudies program. He developed the proposal to advance the programinto a university-wide Institute of African Studies in 2001.Houston directs his department’s first study-abroad course, theInternational Agribusiness Marketing and Management course takesat the University of Veracruz, Mexico.(Faith Peppers is a news editor with the University of GeorgiaCollege of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

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U.S. weekly offshore rig count stuck at 23

first_imgThe number of active offshore rigs in the U.S. remained unchanged at 23 units last week, according to weekly rig count reports released on Friday by Baker Hughes Company.Illustration. Author: SP MacBaker Hughes Rig Count: U.S. unchanged at 790 rigsU.S. Rig Count is unchanged from last week at 790, with oil rigs up 2 to 678, gas rigs down 1 to 110, and miscellaneous rigs down 1 to 2.U.S. Rig Count is down 261 rigs from last year’s count of 1,051, with oil rigs down 179, gas rigs down 84, and miscellaneous rigs up 2 to 2.The U.S. Offshore Rig Count is unchanged at 23 and up 2 rigs year-over-year.Baker Hughes Rig Count: Canada -2 rigs to 255 rigsCanada Rig Count is down 2 rigs from last week to 255, with oil rigs up 5 to 172 and gas rigs down 7 to 83.Canada Rig Count is up 31 rigs from last year’s count of 224, with oil rigs up 20 and gas rigs up 11.Spotted a typo? Have something more to add to the story? Maybe a nice photo? Contact our editorial team via email. Also, if you’re interested in showcasing your company, product, or technology on Offshore Energy Today, please contact us via our advertising form where you can also see our media kit.last_img read more

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