Five win Brooks Awards

first_imgBy Faith PeppersUniversity of GeorgiaFive University of Georgia faculty members received theprestigious D.W. Brooks Awards for Excellence Oct. 18 in Athens,Ga.The $5,000 annual awards recognize UGA College of Agriculturaland Environmental Sciences educators and researchers who excel inteaching, research, extension and public service extensionprograms. An award for international agriculture is given ineven-numbered years.The 2004 winners are JeffreyDorfman, teaching; PaulBertsch, research; BillHurst, extension; DebbiePurvis, public service extension programs; and JackHouston, international agriculture.The CAES sponsors the annual lecture and awards in memory of D.W.Brooks, founder of Gold Kist, Inc., and Cotton States MutualInsurance Companies.Mark Drabenstott, vice president and director of the Center forthe Study of Rural America at the Federal Reserve Bank of KansasCity, delivered the 2004 D.W. Brooks Lecture, “The Brave NewWorld for Land-grant Universities.”Dorfman,an outstanding teacher of agricultural and applied economics, hasreceived the department’s graduate teaching award in 1991 and1992 and undergraduate teaching award in 1998, 2001 and 2003.In 2004, he was presented the Southern Agricultural EconomicsAssociation Distinguished Teaching of a Course Award for hiscourse, “The Economics of Agricultural Processing and Marketing.”This course helps prepare students to work in food industry jobs.They learn to apply economic principles to real-world situations.The course prepares them to solve economic and managementproblems they will likely face in the food industry.Bertschis a professor of soil physical chemistry and mineralogy anddirector of the Savannah River Ecology Lab. His research onaluminum chemistry has improved scientists’ understanding of theelement’s role in soil chemistry and plant and animal toxicity.His extensive work on delineating the chemical speciation, ormolecular form of atoms, of environmental contaminants and onunderstanding the connection between chemical speciation and themobility, bioavailability and toxicity of contaminants is widelyrecognized as pioneering.It has provided the basis of a new research area now generallyknown as molecular environmental science.Hurst,an extension food scientist, has been a leader in developing foodsafety training and workshop materials for the fresh andfresh-cut produce industries for more than 20 years.His work with the Georgia Department of Agriculture and otherentities is recognized nationwide. He developed the Georgia State”Fresh Produce Safety Team” and the nation’s first GAPs (GoodAgricultural Practices) short course for the fresh produceindustry.Hurst’s Georgia GAPs Food Safety Program for Georgia producegrowers, packers and shippers program saved thousands of dollarsin third-party audit fees for the industry. It is a model forother states that are working to establish similar programs.Purvis,an extension agent in Colquitt County, is involved in projectssuch as “Smart Kids Fight BAC,” a multistate food safetycurriculum, and the Faculty Research Grant Pilot Study, a profileand needs assessment of the Latino migrant population.She has trained a bilingual staff and now offers food serviceemployees a state-required food handler certification training inboth Spanish and English.She led in procuring a grant for “Voz de la Familia,” afamily-centered community outreach program, and has taughtnutrition, food safety and chronic disease prevention to nearly1,000 Latino farm workers since 2002.Houstonhas taught agricultural and applied economics at UGA since 1984.Before that, he was a Peace Corps volunteer in Malawi and thenspent nine years with the Malawi Ministry of Agriculture. Hetrained more than 2,000 agricultural extension personnel and ledin planning and developing the curriculum of a new college ofnatural resources.At UGA, Houston has been the interim director of the Africanstudies program. He developed the proposal to advance the programinto a university-wide Institute of African Studies in 2001.Houston directs his department’s first study-abroad course, theInternational Agribusiness Marketing and Management course takesat the University of Veracruz, Mexico.(Faith Peppers is a news editor with the University of GeorgiaCollege of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

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Ashwin equals Muralitharan’s record to being fastest to 350 Test wickets

first_imgRAVICHANDRAN  Ashwin is back in the top ten for Test bowlers in the ICC rankings after his match haul of eight wickets in his first international match in 2019, the first Test against South Africa in Visakhapatnam. Rohit Sharma, who marked his Test opening debut with twin hundreds, vaulted 36 places to a career-high 17th while his captain Virat Kohli had his points drop below 900. Steven Smith continues to lead the Test batting rankings with 937 points, opening up a 38-point lead over Kohli.During the Test, Ashwin also became the joint-fastest to 350 Test wickets along with Muttiah Muralitharan. The triumphant return has helped him move from 14th place to tenth among bowlers.Rohit also enjoyed a productive Test, setting several records as a Test opener. Notably, he hit 13 sixes, the most by a batsman in a Test match. Mayank Agarwal, Rohit’s opening partner who converted his maiden Test hundred into a double-century, jumped from 63rd place to 25th. Ajinkya Rahane, meanwhile, dropped three places to tenth.Among the South Africans, Quinton de Kock, who made 111 in the first innings in Visakhapatnam, broke into the top ten, claiming seventh place ahead of openers Tom Latham, Dimuth Karunaratne and Rahane. Opener Dean Elgar also gained five places and made it to 14th, having struck 160 in a big partnership with de Kock in the first innings.Mohammed Shami, who enhanced his reputation as a second-innings specialist, moved up two places to 16th, achieving a career-high 710 points on the table led by Australia’s Pat Cummins.Ashwin broke into the top five among allrounders too, while Ravindra Jadeja has gone past Shakib Al Hasan to the second spot. West Indies’ Jason Holder tops the rankings with 472 points.last_img read more

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China Tips Africa as Next ‘Big Miracle’

first_img– Advertisement – Mr. Yan of Xinhua News Agency’s International Department – Chinese Experts tell visiting African Journalists that the continent has the potential to boom economicallyBy William Q. Harmon from Beijing The level of development that has taken place in China in less than three decades is a miracle that can be replicated in Africa, top Chinese government officials told a group of African journalists visiting that country. Africa has everything to make it as developed as any part of the world, said veteran Chinese media practitioner Yan Wenbin.Just a little over a decade or two ago, China was just considered as any third-world country striving to define itself. Even the Chinese case was more difficult when compared to many of its counterparts who were striving for self-determination, given its huge population at the time, which many believed posed a grave threat to its forward march.But with much determination, resilience, requisite policies and a focused leadership, China is being called a “miracle economy.”The 35 media practitioners from 10 African countries may have heard about the Chinese economic miracle, but their prior knowledge could do little to hold back the shocks that reverberated through them when they landed on Chinese soil—beholding for themselves the tremendous economic and infrastructural developments that country is experiencing.These journalists, almost all of who were visiting for the first time, were there on invitation from the Chinese government to attend the “2017 Seminar for Renowned African Journalists,” a two-week event. They all were amazed about how advanced China has become especially after attending lectures, visiting key historic sites and major institutions, including media houses, medical and other facilities.The facts of the Chinese economic growth after the Economic Reform started in 1978 are undisputed: From 1978 until 2013, the economy increased by about 9.5% a year and became the second largest in the world a few years ago after the United States. Per capita GDP in China went from below $300 to over $6000 today.To say that what happened to the Chinese economy after 1978 was unexpected would be a vast understatement. According to Yan Wenbin, the director general of Xinhua News Agency’s International Department, after the introduction of the “Great Leap Forward” by the Founding Father of Modern China, Chairman Mao Zedong, China appeared to have found the magic formula in 1978 under Deng Xiaoping. He re-introduced the goal of the Four Modernizations – of agriculture, industry, military, and science and technology.“He talked of building a Xiaokang Society by the end of the 20th century. When he died in 1997, China was well on its way to achieving the income target of a Xiaokang Society and had already survived the traumatic events in 1989, yet there were still doubters at home and even more abroad who did not trust his successors to carry on further reforms to sustain the growth,” Mr. Yan said.China’s high-speed economic growth has substantially increased the wealth of the country’s population, he told the journalists. “This is particularly the case in cities, where factory workers’ wages have risen strongly, giving them more disposable income – measured by one’s income minus their personal taxes.”In spite of these improvements, China still faces some major challenges—some of these being poverty and pollution, as well as population control.Despite vast improvements in urban life, earnings in the countryside have lagged behind. But people living in rural areas have seen a marked increase in their disposable income.“This economic growth does in no way mean that we are free of problems. We have more problems than you could imagine. The issue of poverty is still a very grave one though our government is exerting every effort to improve this. China is still a developing country and we’ve got more to achieve,” Mr. Yan said.In spite of the unprecedented scale at which the Chinese economic growth has unfolded, after 1978 it is second to none both in its explosiveness and longevity. West Germany may have produced “Wirtschaftswunder” (German for economic miracle) in rebuilding its economy from the ashes of the Third Reich, but the growth numbers pale in comparison to China, reaching 8 percent in the 1950’s and under 5 percent in the 1960’s.How is that phenomenal growth rate possible, when other countries relying heavily on exports, like most African countries, have suffered major downturns and remain in the doldrums? Many, including the visiting journalists, continue to marvel at what has come to be known as the “Chinese Economic Miracle.”Top Chinese diplomat Ren Xiaoping, lecturing on China and Africa’s development, said Africa is a great continent that has all it takes to witness the same economic boom that China has been able to experience since the late 80’s and 90’s, up to date.Madam Ren, former Chinese Ambassador to Botswana, said the seeds of China’s rapid economic growth since the 1990s were first planted back in 1978 when the Communist Party started to introduce capitalist market principles, initially in the agriculture sector.Madam Ren Xiaoping, former Chinese Ambassador to BotswanaShe said China has tipped Africa to be the next big economic miracle of the world. “You can make it because you have the potential to do so. Africa has the potential to accelerate development in all of the sectors that China is doing well in, especially agriculture.”For this to happen on a continent that has been marred by rampant corruption and bad governance, it would take the right leaders who will put the people at the center of development, and sincere global partnerships.“I don’t care if it’s a white cat or a black cat. It’s a good cat so long as it catches mice,” the famous Xiaoping, Deng, who is credited for opening China to foreign investment, is quoted as saying. And the color of the mice is indeed a non-issue, since China has become one of the economic wonders of the 20th and 21st centuries.If African leaders mean well, they must take cues from the Chinese experience.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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