Five win Brooks Awards

first_imgBy Faith PeppersUniversity of GeorgiaFive University of Georgia faculty members received theprestigious D.W. Brooks Awards for Excellence Oct. 18 in Athens,Ga.The $5,000 annual awards recognize UGA College of Agriculturaland Environmental Sciences educators and researchers who excel inteaching, research, extension and public service extensionprograms. An award for international agriculture is given ineven-numbered years.The 2004 winners are JeffreyDorfman, teaching; PaulBertsch, research; BillHurst, extension; DebbiePurvis, public service extension programs; and JackHouston, international agriculture.The CAES sponsors the annual lecture and awards in memory of D.W.Brooks, founder of Gold Kist, Inc., and Cotton States MutualInsurance Companies.Mark Drabenstott, vice president and director of the Center forthe Study of Rural America at the Federal Reserve Bank of KansasCity, delivered the 2004 D.W. Brooks Lecture, “The Brave NewWorld for Land-grant Universities.”Dorfman,an outstanding teacher of agricultural and applied economics, hasreceived the department’s graduate teaching award in 1991 and1992 and undergraduate teaching award in 1998, 2001 and 2003.In 2004, he was presented the Southern Agricultural EconomicsAssociation Distinguished Teaching of a Course Award for hiscourse, “The Economics of Agricultural Processing and Marketing.”This course helps prepare students to work in food industry jobs.They learn to apply economic principles to real-world situations.The course prepares them to solve economic and managementproblems they will likely face in the food industry.Bertschis a professor of soil physical chemistry and mineralogy anddirector of the Savannah River Ecology Lab. His research onaluminum chemistry has improved scientists’ understanding of theelement’s role in soil chemistry and plant and animal toxicity.His extensive work on delineating the chemical speciation, ormolecular form of atoms, of environmental contaminants and onunderstanding the connection between chemical speciation and themobility, bioavailability and toxicity of contaminants is widelyrecognized as pioneering.It has provided the basis of a new research area now generallyknown as molecular environmental science.Hurst,an extension food scientist, has been a leader in developing foodsafety training and workshop materials for the fresh andfresh-cut produce industries for more than 20 years.His work with the Georgia Department of Agriculture and otherentities is recognized nationwide. He developed the Georgia State”Fresh Produce Safety Team” and the nation’s first GAPs (GoodAgricultural Practices) short course for the fresh produceindustry.Hurst’s Georgia GAPs Food Safety Program for Georgia producegrowers, packers and shippers program saved thousands of dollarsin third-party audit fees for the industry. It is a model forother states that are working to establish similar programs.Purvis,an extension agent in Colquitt County, is involved in projectssuch as “Smart Kids Fight BAC,” a multistate food safetycurriculum, and the Faculty Research Grant Pilot Study, a profileand needs assessment of the Latino migrant population.She has trained a bilingual staff and now offers food serviceemployees a state-required food handler certification training inboth Spanish and English.She led in procuring a grant for “Voz de la Familia,” afamily-centered community outreach program, and has taughtnutrition, food safety and chronic disease prevention to nearly1,000 Latino farm workers since 2002.Houstonhas taught agricultural and applied economics at UGA since 1984.Before that, he was a Peace Corps volunteer in Malawi and thenspent nine years with the Malawi Ministry of Agriculture. Hetrained more than 2,000 agricultural extension personnel and ledin planning and developing the curriculum of a new college ofnatural resources.At UGA, Houston has been the interim director of the Africanstudies program. He developed the proposal to advance the programinto a university-wide Institute of African Studies in 2001.Houston directs his department’s first study-abroad course, theInternational Agribusiness Marketing and Management course takesat the University of Veracruz, Mexico.(Faith Peppers is a news editor with the University of GeorgiaCollege of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

Read more

Chamorro wins MPSF Player of the Week

first_imgAfter a dominant performance between the pipes for the No. 2 USC women’s water polo team over the weekend, junior goalie Victória Chamorro was named MPSF Player of the Week for the first time in her career.The Rio de Janeiro, Brazil native was locked in on defense down in La Jolla, Calif. at the Triton Invitational, recording 19 saves in just two games. Her standout performance in the championship match against No. 5 Arizona State included 12 saves, which helped USC (14-0) secure its fourth consecutive Triton Invitational crown.In Saturday’s game against No. 17 San Diego State, Chamorro stopped seven shots in just three periods of work and allowed only two goals to lead USC to a 17-4 victory over the Aztecs.USC came away unscathed in pool play, and after a win in the semifinals of the tournament against No. 6 Michigan, Chamorro would once again man the cage for USC against MPSF rival Arizona State. After giving up one goal early in the first frame, she silenced the Sun Devils in the second and fourth periods and allowed just one more goal en route to the 12-2 win in the title match. Chamorro’s strength and quickness bothered Arizona State the entire evening, as she tallied a couple of key steals and finished with 12 stops in goal. In total, she allowed just four goals over the weekend.The 2016 Rio Olympian leads USC with a 2.48 goals allowed per game average, only letting 13 goals get past her so far this season. In 21 total periods of work, she has recorded 55 saves for a 10.48 saves per game average and leads a stingy USC defense that allows just 3.36 goals per game, compared to the team’s 18.5 goals per game scoring average.The junior is also ranked No. 6 all-time in the USC record books for career saves. In her freshman season, her 207 saves were the most ever recorded by a first-year goalie at USC and the ninth most in program history. For her efforts in 2015, Chamorro was named to the MPSF All-Newcomer Team and earned All-American Honorable Mention status.As a sophomore last season, she helped USC capture the program’s fifth national championship with a 6.7 saves per game average.Chamorro and the Trojans will now head down to Irvine, Calif., to take part in the 2017 UCI Invitational. Action begins on Feb. 24 and will conclude Feb. 26 at the Anteater Aquatics Center.last_img read more

Read more

The 14th Annual Friendship Run Returns March 26

first_imgFacebook0Tweet0Pin0 Submitted by Westside Cooperative PreschoolFor the last 13 years, the Friendship Run has provided an opportunity for South Sound runners to dust off their running shoes and celebrate St. Patrick’s Day, all while supporting a great cause. All proceeds from the Friendship Run support the Westside Cooperative Preschool (a 501(c)(3) Non-Profit) by providing funding for the preschool’s scholarship program, as well as educational materials and supplies for the school.The Friendship Run celebrates 14 years supporting the Westside Co-op Preschool. Photo courtesy: Westside Co-op Preschool.The Friendship Run started in 2003 with just a 5K race, and a 10K was added for the Run’s 10th anniversary in 2013. We have stroller divisions in both distances, and also offer a free kid’s run for kids age 2 to 8. Prizes are awarded to all age group and grand prize winners.The race is traditionally held on the weekend nearest St. Patrick’s Day, but we decided to have the race one weekend later to give us a better chance of great spring weather.Our course begins at McLane Elementary School in west Olympia, and heads north towards The Evergreen State College. The 5K course loops south on Delphi Road, while the 10K continues on through the College campus and returns to McLane Elementary School.The Friendship Run event also offers several great raffle prizes, generously donated by local businesses (tickets are $2 each or 3 for $5), as well as a large craft area for kids. Childcare is not provided during the race.This year’s Friendship Run will take place March 26. Photo courtesy: Westside Co-op PreschoolRace shirts are provided to the first 75 paid registrants, and will also be available for purchase on race day.Check out the Friendship Run online, and follow us on Facebook for race information and updates.You can register online now.last_img read more

Read more