GEEK PICK OF THE DAY A Scarf Fit to Destroy Half of

first_img The world is crazy about Thanos right now, well half of the world. The other half is very fussy with him, me included. You know what you did THADDY! But that didn’t deter ThinkGeek from putting their noodles together with Marvel to create this one of a kind Infinity Gauntlet scarf. This is another stellar entry in the  Gear Up Collection they’re formed with the famous comic company.I’ve actually been using this scarf to tuck into my jacket on chilly nights. The light gauzy material is perfect for breezy spring/summer evenings. It’s soft and surprisingly comfy. And it’s got all the Infinity Stones waiting for you, no soul sacrifices required or endless searching across the galaxies.It won’t, however, protect you from super soldiers trying to rain on your parade of universal domination. We tested it on our roof just to make sure of that. But Film Jackets’ Captain America Stealth piece couldn’t stop the all-around badass-ness of the scarf. It still managed to glimmer in the sunlight even under all the strength and might of Steve Rogers (played by Victoria Song). That’s right each little gauntlet has shimmery foil thread woven through, just to give it that extra pop of villainry.The scarf is pretty long (70″ x 44″), which is great because it gives you a million options of how to tie it up and style it. It’s thin enough to bunch together in a coat or hoodie without it looking bulky. And just like Thanos, you can do it all yourself, no lackeys required to get wrapped up in it. The scarf is currently $19.99 and perfect for any pal entrenched in Avengers frenzy. It’ll keep you cozy for the next 12 months while we wait for the ol’ number 4. So just promise not to snuff out existence if you nab one. But honestly, you’ll look too good to care.Let us know what you like about Geek by taking our survey. Stay on target Geek Pick: Shure MV88+ Is An Excellent, On the Go Microphone KitGeek Pick: Amazon Smart Plug Puts Alexa in Your Walls last_img read more

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AI Tool Quicksilver Fills Gaps in Wikipedia Knowledge

first_imgStay on target It’s not exactly news that women are overlooked and underappreciated.But thanks to a new machine learning system, female scientists, technologists, engineers, and mathematicians (among other professionals) will finally get their digital due.San Francisco-based Primer is using artificial intelligence to fill in existing gaps in human-generated knowledge—starting with notable ladies like Canadian roboticist Joelle Pineau, addiction treatment researcher Miriam Adelson, and Evelyn Wang, head of MIT’s MechE department.None of whom, until this month, had articles on English Wikipedia. Yet, someone took the time to curate a “list of people who have lived at airports” for the online encyclopedia.“I didn’t discover those people on my own. I used a machine learning system we’re building,” John Bohannon, director of science at Primer, wrote in a recent blog post. “It discovered and described them for me.”(And the Internet created entries for him.)“It does this much as a human would, if a human could read 500 million news articles, 39 million scientific papers, all of Wikipedia, and then write 70,000 biographical summaries of scientists,” Bohannon added.It’s called Quicksilver. And it’s an homage to Neal Stephenson’s Baroque Cycle novel series, which imagines technology that captures all human information “in a vast encyclopedia that will be a sort of machine, not only for finding old knowledge but for making new.”Trained on 30,000 English Wikipedia articles about scientists, their Wikidata entries, and more than 3 million sentences from news documents, as well as the names and affiliations of 200,000 authors of scientific papers, Quicksilver produced shocking results.“In the morning we found 40,000 people missing from Wikipedia who have a similar distribution of news coverage as those who do have articles,” Bohannon said. “Quicksilver doubled the number of scientists potentially eligible for a Wikipedia article overnight.”Launched more than 17 years ago, Wikipedia remains one of the largest and most popular general reference works on the Internet. But it takes a lot of upkeep; every article must be meticulously cited and regularly updated—forever.Despite a decade of attempts, no one has managed to crack the code for computer-generated passages. And Primer doesn’t plan to, either.Rather than use the World Wide Web “as an academic testbed for summarization algorithms,” Bohannon said, the firm is working on a system “that can be used for building and maintaining knowledge bases” like Wikipedia.As an experiment, Primer is publishing a sample of 100 short Quicksilver-generated summaries of scientists missing from Wikipedia.“We’re curious how long it will take before someone creates their articles,” Bohannon said.In the span of about a week, all three women mentioned in his blog have since been covered on the site. Three down, tens of thousands to go.To learn more about AI click here.Let us know what you like about Geek by taking our survey. McDonald’s Plans to Serve AI Voice Technology at Drive ThruCIMON Returns to Earth After 14 Months on ISS last_img read more

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