CULTURAL CLEANSING By Jim Redwine

first_img Gavel Gamut By Jim Redwinewww.jamesmredwine.com)CULTURAL CLEANSINGA nation is its culture and experience, its history. That is what determines its character. The same is true of the world. We learn or do not learn from the mistakes and accomplishments of ourselves and those who have preceded us. If we learn, we can accomplish more. If we do not learn, we may repeat mistakes. To learn from the past we must know and understand it. If we hide the past, we do not change what has happened but we may live to regret that we no longer remember it.ISIS or ISIL, the Islamic State of Iraq or the Islamic State of Syria, has been culturally cleansing the ancient Middle East for several years. Its members are offended by statues, monuments and artifacts that once, before ISIS destroyed them, carried within them thousands of years of human knowledge and culture. ISIS could not bear to allow memories of ancient or even contemporary peoples who had the temerity to have different beliefs from ISIS. This is particularly puzzling with religious differences since ISIS’s belief system is based on its particular interpretation of Islam which could not have existed before Mohammad who lived from 570 A.D. to 632 A.D. Yet ISIS viciously attacks the artifacts and history of cultures thousands of years old.Of course, ISIS as all such denigrators of history, is not changing the facts of history. ISIS is merely proving their own ignorance of it. Such actions are much as children who put their hands over their eyes or duck their heads under the covers in an attempt to convince themselves that because they do not see something it never existed. Or as ISIS and some other people do, they destroy historical artifacts and try to convince themselves and others that a certain history never happened. Of greater concern is the very real possibility their actions will lead to the loss by future generations of an opportunity to learn from that history.To preserve and observe a historical artifact, a temple to Baal that was 5,000 years old or a Christian church that was 2,000 years old for example, is not to worship Baal or Jesus but is to build upon and learn from history. To destroy artifacts of a nation’s past does not change that past but it may result in the nation repeating past errors because those errors are out of sight and therefore out of mind.History teaches us that power waxes and wanes and that who is on top today may be oppressed tomorrow. The burning or banning of books, say the Bible for example, does not invalidate a book’s content. It does validate the lack of vision of those who arrogate to themselves the sole interpretation of truth or history.Each of us has the right to venerate or denigrate whatever philosophy, religion or creed we wish. However, just because what happened in history may be offensive to us does not mean we should attempt to establish such history never occurred. Haven’t we lived through enough of such culture destroying behavior to recognize the danger in such a course?Perhaps next week we can revisit such a revision of history that occurred right here in Posey County, Indiana and delve into what that revision might mean to us today.For more Gavel Gamut articles go to:www.jamesmredwine.comA nation is its culture and experience, its history. That is what determines its character. The same is true of the world. We learn or do not learn from the mistakes and accomplishments of ourselves and those who have preceded us. If we learn, we can accomplish more. If we do not learn, we may repeat mistakes. To learn from the past we must know and understand it. If we hide the past, we do not change what has happened but we may live to regret that we no longer remember it.ISIS or ISIL, the Islamic State of Iraq or the Islamic State of Syria, has been culturally cleansing the ancient Middle East for several years. Its members are offended by statues, monuments and artifacts that once, before ISIS destroyed them, carried within them thousands of years of human knowledge and culture. ISIS could not bear to allow memories of ancient or even contemporary peoples who had the temerity to have different beliefs from ISIS. This is particularly puzzling with religious differences since ISIS’s belief system is based on its particular interpretation of Islam which could not have existed before Mohammad who lived from 570 A.D. to 632 A.D. Yet ISIS viciously attacks the artifacts and history of cultures thousands of years old.Of course, ISIS as all such denigrators of history, is not changing the facts of history. ISIS is merely proving their own ignorance of it. Such actions are much as children who put their hands over their eyes or duck their heads under the covers in an attempt to convince themselves that because they do not see something it never existed. Or as ISIS and some other people do, they destroy historical artifacts and try to convince themselves and others that a certain history never happened. Of greater concern is the very real possibility their actions will lead to the loss by future generations of an opportunity to learn from that history.To preserve and observe a historical artifact, a temple to Baal that was 5,000 years old or a Christian church that was 2,000 years old for example, is not to worship Baal or Jesus but is to build upon and learn from history. To destroy artifacts of a nation’s past does not change that past but it may result in the nation repeating past errors because those errors are out of sight and therefore out of mind.History teaches us that power waxes and wanes and that who is on top today may be oppressed tomorrow. The burning or banning of books, say the Bible for example, does not invalidate a book’s content. It does validate the lack of vision of those who arrogate to themselves the sole interpretation of truth or history.Each of us has the right to venerate or denigrate whatever philosophy, religion or creed we wish. However, just because what happened in history may be offensive to us does not mean we should attempt to establish such history never occurred. Haven’t we lived through enough of such culture destroying behavior to recognize the danger in such a course?Perhaps next week we can revisit such a revision of history that occurred right here in Posey County, Indiana and delve into what that revision might mean to us today.For more Gavel Gamut articles go to:www.jamesmredwine.comFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Applicants needed for bar examiners

first_img Applicants needed for bar examiners Florida Board of Bar Examiners Vacancy : Lawyer applicants are being sought to fill two vacancies on the Florida Board of Bar Examiners. The Board of Governors will be selecting six nominees for two lawyer vacancies at its June 2 meeting. The nominations will then be forwarded to the Supreme Court to fill the five-year terms commencing November 1. Attorney members must have been a member of The Florida Bar for at least five years. They must be practicing lawyers with scholarly attainments and have an affirmative interest in legal education and requirements for admission to the Bar. Appointment or election to the bench at any level of the court system will disqualify any applicant. Law professors or trustees are ineligible. Board members of the bar examiners must be able to attend approximately 10 meetings a year in various Florida locations. Members volunteer 300 or more hours per year on board business depending on committee assignments. Actual travel expenses connected with the meetings and examinations are reimbursed. Persons interested in applying may download the application from www.floridabar.org, or should contact The Florida Bar at 850/561-5600, ext. 5757, to obtain the proper application form. Applications may also be obtained by writing the Executive Director, The Florida Bar, 651 East Jefferson Street, Tallahassee, 32399-2300. Completed applications must be received no later than the close of business April 7. Resumes will not be accepted in lieu of the required application. The Board of Governors will review all applications and may request telephone or personal interviews. Applicants needed for bar examiners April 15, 2006 Regular Newslast_img read more

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Road crash kills 2

first_imgBACOLOD City – The motorcycle they were riding crashed against atricycle in Burgos Extension, Barangay Estefania. Amihan, meanwhile, was rushed to the Corazon Locsin MontelibanoMemorial Regional Hospital here where he was declared “dead on arrival.” According to police investigators, Amihan was driving a motorcycle withthe unidentified back rider when they hit a car around 2:05 a.m. on March 1. The 25-year-old driver Jolyn Amihan of Barangay Nabitasan, La Paz,Iloilo City and an unidentified person sustained fatal body injuries, a policereport showed. The unidentified person died on the spot, police added. Pediongola, on the other hand, was detained in the custodial facilityof Police Station 4, while the driver of the car has yet to be identified as ofthis writing./PN They fled and later then crashed against a tricycle driven by37-year-old Roland Pediongola of Barangay Granada, police said.last_img read more

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Herb Wilhelmy

first_imgHerbert John Wilhelmy, of Sunman, was born on June 27, 1928 in Cincinnati, Ohio, the son of Harry and Carrie EtzKorn Wilhelmy.  He retired from construction, having worked for Flannery and Esz Construction of Williamsburg, Ohio.  Herb was well known as the “Chicken Man” at the local auctions where he often sold livestock, and he enjoyed fishing and visiting flea markets.  On Monday, October 16, 2017, at the age of 89, he passed away at Arbor Grove in Greensburg.     Cremation was chosen by the family, and a visitation will be held on Saturday, November 4, 2017 from 1 until 3 p.m. at Cook Rosenberger Funeral Home, 929 Main Street, Brookville.  Memorial contributions can be directed to the family to assist with expenses.  To sign the online guestbook or to leave a personal condolence, please visit www.cookrosenberger.com.  The staff of Cook Rosenberger Funeral Home is honored to care for the family of Herb Wilhelmy.center_img Those surviving who will cherish Herb’s memory include nieces, nephews, and many friends.  Besides his parents, he was preceded in death by 8 brothers and sisters.  last_img read more

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Super Falcons in Must-win Battle with Cote d’Ivoire Today

first_imgIn that encounter played at the Parc des Sports de Treichville, both teams created several opportunities but failed to put the ball in the net.However, Chairperson of the Nigerian Women’s Professional League and Board Member of the NFF, Aisha Falode insisted yesterday that Falcons cannot afford to miss this chance to be at the Olympic again.The last time Falcons played at the Olympiad was at Beijing 2008.“Our last Olympic appearance was in Beijing China, in 2008. This is a perfect time for us to return to Asia in 2020.“This match is a must-win if we are to make progress in the quest for Tokyo 2020. Agege Stadium is our home and we need to take this advantage. Super Falcons have never lost a match here at the Soccer Temple,” observed Falode.Following the draw in Abidjan, Falode insisted that Falcons must “show the character of true champions and give the Nigerian people and the teeming football loving Lagosians victory against Cote d’ Ivoire.”Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram TOKYO 2020 QUALIFIERSuper Falcons of Nigeria and Les Femelles Elephantes of Cote d’Ivoire are to engage in a bruising battle this afternoon for the ticket to the Tokyo 2020 Women’s Football Tournament event at the Agege Stadium.The Ivorians held the African champions to a barren draw in the first leg of the second round qualifying match played in Abidjan last week.last_img read more

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