Culbreath, Scherm Honored

first_imgTwo prominent faculty members of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Albert Culbreath and Harald Scherm, have been named 2020 Fellows of the American Phytopathological Society (APS).The society grants this honor to a current APS member in recognition of distinguished contributions to plant pathology or to APS. Recognition as a Fellow is based on significant contributions in original research, teaching, administration, professional and public service, and/or extension and outreach.​“Being named a Fellow is a scientific society’s greatest honor,” said Sam Pardue, dean and director of CAES. “We are proud of Drs. Culbreath and Scherm for this outstanding recognition. It not only speaks of the excellence of their individual programs, but to the quality of the plant pathology department at UGA as well.”Albert K. Culbreath is a professor of plant pathology at the University of Georgia Tifton campus. He is recognized as a leader in the ecology, epidemiology and control of thrips-vectored tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), and of early and late leaf-spot diseases of peanut.He is an author on more than 200 journal articles and book chapters, and co-developer of five TSWV-resistant peanut cultivars.Culbreath was a co-developer of the “Tomato Spotted Wilt Risk Index” and “Peanut Rx” educational tools that ensured economic viability of peanut production when the disease threatened the industry’s existence in the 1990s. He has been an integral part of a multidisciplinary team approach to this complex problem that has produced an integrated spotted-wilt management program combining multiple suppressive factors to control the disease. Adoption of the integrated system coincided with dramatic decline in annual losses to TSWV in peanut.As a part of this work, he documented slower epidemic development in several cultivars and breeding lines than in ‘Florunner’, the predominant peanut cultivar grown in the U.S. until the early 1990s. Culbreath has characterized the field reaction to TSWV of numerous breeding lines from multiple peanut breeders. Several of those have been released as cultivars.Much of his work on integrating resistant or tolerant cultivars with suppressive cultural practices is applicable to both organic and conventional production in developing and developed countries.Most recently, Culbreath reported synergistic effects of elemental sulfur with sterol biosynthesis inhibiting (SBI) fungicides for control of late leaf spot in fields where the SBI fungicides alone provided little control. He and UGA colleague Katherine Stevenson co-authored the chapter on fungicide resistance in peanut pathogens in the recent second edition of “Fungicide Resistance in North America.” Culbreath has served as president, councilor and division forum representative of the APS Southern Division. He is a Fellow of the American Peanut Research and Education Society, and he was previously recognized with the APS Novartis Award, the UGA D.W. Brooks Award for Excellence in Research and the APS Southern Division Outstanding Plant Pathologist Award.He has also served on 41 graduate student committees and been the major professor for seven master’s degree students and four doctoral candidates. He teaches “Introductory Plant Pathology” at UGA-Tifton.Harald Scherm is department head and professor in the UGA Department of Plant Pathology. He is recognized for his pioneering research on pathogen biology, epidemiology and disease management in fruit crops, especially blueberry. He has had a career-long fascination with understanding and managing diseases with unorthodox life histories, such as mummy berry, Exobasidium leaf and fruit spot, and orange cane blotch.Scherm, who joined the UGA Department of Plant Pathology in 1996, is known for his early research on mummy berry, which elucidated the epidemiology of the disease on southern blueberries, developed a mummy-germination model to anticipate primary infection, and implemented improved fungicide schedules aligned with host and pathogen phenology. This work formed the basis for Scherm’s recognition with the Lee M. Hutchins Award in 2003 and the Julius-Kühn Prize in 2004. Subsequent research on this pathosystem shifted to host-pathogen interactions during the flower infection process and culminated in the publication of an article in the Annual Review of Phytopathologyin 2006.Scherm served as the assistant dean for research in CAES between 2010 and 2017 and has been head of the Department of Plant Pathology since July 2016. Under his leadership, the department added 11 new faculty members and the number of graduate students has reached an all-time high of 53, as of fall 2019. The UGA Department of Plant Pathology is recognized internationally for its comprehensive and integrative research and outreach portfolio, spanning basic, translational and applied programs.Scherm has authored 198 publications, trained 22 graduate students, and received UGA’s Excellence in Graduate Mentoring Award. Most recently, he took the lead in establishing UGA’s interdisciplinary graduate certificate program in Agricultural Data Science, for which he currently serves as the coordinator.He served APS on numerous committees, on the editorial boards of Phytopathology and Plant Disease, and is currently providing leadership for Phytopathology as the journal’s editor-in-chief.“This is a well-deserved honor for two outstanding scientists and earned recognition of the international-quality science that emanates from the UGA plant pathology department,” said Allen Moore, CAES associate dean of research. “It is especially gratifying to see scientists from both our foundational and applied research areas recognized at this exceptional level, demonstrating the balanced strength of UGA agricultural research.”last_img read more

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Thomas ready to tee it up at first PGA Tour event of 2020

first_imgJustin Thomas’ all-around game has made him one of the hottest players on the PGA Tour and the American will try to carry that momentum into this week’s Tournament of Champions, the first event of 2020. Thomas, Dustin Johnson and Jon Rahm are the headliners for the event as the tour returns from a December hiatus at the par-73 Plantation Course in Kapalua, Hawaii. The field, which consists of only those who won on the tour last year, includes just 34 golfers after several notable winners decided to skip the no-cut event. Top-ranked Brooks Koepka is out with a left knee injury while Rory McIlroy, Phil Mickelson and Tiger Woods also qualified but opted not to play, as did Justin Rose, Francesco Molinari and British Open champion Shane Lowry. That sets the stage for Thomas to take advantage. Thomas said his goal for 2020 is to get back to the world number one ranking. “All the motivation I need to get to number one in the world is in myself,” he said. “I don’t need to try to prove anybody wrong. “I don’t need to do it because people said I can’t. Because I want to be there is big enough motivation for me.” The 26-year-old Thomas, one of only 10 players in PGA history to shoot a sub-60 round, won the BMW Championship in August, finished fourth at the Safeway Open in September and won the CJ Cup in October. Thomas also did well at the Presidents Cup in Australia last month, finishing with a record of 3-1-1, his loss coming in the singles competition. Read  Also: Australian Open: Sharapova says there’s still a lot of fire amid wildcard offer Johnson is making his first start of the 2019-20 season and has seven consecutive top-10 finishes in the event. Defending champion Xander Schauffele overcame a five-shot deficit entering the final round last year by posting a tournament-record 62 on Sunday. He is trying to become the first player since Geoff Ogilvy (2009-10) to repeat as champion. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Loading… center_img Promoted Content6 Great Ancient Mysteries That Make China Worth VisitingThe Best Cars Of All Time8 Superfoods For Growing Hair Back And Stimulating Its Growth9 Facts You Should Know Before Getting A TattooWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?The Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read More5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme ParksArchaeologists Still Have No Explanation For These Discoveries12 Countries With Higest Technology In The WorldCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable Way14 Hilarious Comics Made By Women You Need To Follow Right NowBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For Them The 2017 PGA Championship winner, Thomas has a burning desire to put together a complete season and get off to a strong start after last year was interrupted by a nagging right wrist injury. “Yeah, I could have been a pity party and asked for more attention, but I definitely didn’t deserve anything special,” said Thomas, who has qualified for this event four of the past five years. “I mean, I hadn’t done what I had the year before and definitely not two years before that. “Even with the injury happening, I tried to stay patient, and I was glad to see it kind of come back to how it felt at the end of the year.” Thomas will have competition from world number three Rahm, who is the top-ranked player in the field. Spain’s Rahm has three wins and 10 top-10s in his past 13 starts worldwide, vaulting him to a career-high ranking.last_img read more

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