PHOTOS: Lettuce Invites Rapper Hi-Tek During Shows With Kung Fu In Covington, KY

first_imgOver the weekend, Lettuce finished off their Beyond The Clouds tours with a packed two-night run at the Madison Theater in Covington, Kentucky, with Kung Fu. Notably, Hi-Tek, a Cincinnati-based rapper joined Lettuce during one of their performances, truly tapping into Lettuce’s hip-hop roots, which the band laces with tight-knit funk and celestial jazz. You can check out photos from both nights via Doug Siegel Photography below.Photos: Lettuce | Madison Theater | Covington, KY | 3/30-31/2018 | Credit: Doug Siegel Photo: Doug Seigel Load remaining imageslast_img

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F-M girls swimmers earn fourth straight sectional Class A title

first_imgMoving to the 500 freestyle, Mathews went hard all the way to the end and, in 5:13.57, again just was faster than was needed since the state qualifying time was 5:14.65. Emma Luttrell got second place in 5:21.30 and Grace Reyna was sixth in 5:47 flat.Though hailing from nearby Cazenovia, Morgan Kingsley qualified for four different races at the state meet. By herself, she went 24.78 seconds in the 50-yard freestyle to beat the state qualifying standard of 24.84 and then hold off Cicero-North Syracuse’s Bryn Myers, who was second in 25.17 seconds. Eighth-grader Georgia Langan took third place in 25.35 seconds.Also, in the 100 breaststroke, Kingsley entered as the top seed with her regular-season time of 1:10.13, but she needed 1:08.60 to reach the state meet – and got there, her 1:08.37 well clear of Liverpool’s Delaney Gellert (1:09.98) in the runner-up spot. F-M’s Katie Ottaviano was third in 1:10.55, with teammates Meghan Seidberg and Caitlin Rameas fifth and sixth, respectively.Luttrell reached the state meet in the 100 butterfly, where her time of 59.95 seconds just was enough since 1:00.02 was needed. Antshel again finished second, in 1:01.31, while Hali Seidberg was sixth in 1:02.98.F-M also qualified for the state meet in two different relays. Kingsley, Luttrell, Langan and Hannah Kellogg went 1:40.16 to win the 200 freestyle relay over Oswego (1:41.61), while Mathews joined Kellogg, Kingsley and Luttrell to go 3:42.29 and win the 400 freestyle relay when 3:42.73 was needed for the state meet.On her own, Kellogg won the 200 freestyle in 1:58.66 to beat out Oswego’s Sydney DeLapp (1:59.48). Meghan Seidberg was sixth in 2:05.47 and Reyna (2:08.85) took eighth place.Kellogg also finished third in the 100 freestyle in 54.57 seconds, while Langan was fourth in 55.98 seconds after she had helped Antshel, Ottaviano and Mathews win the 200 medley relay in 1:52.99 to Liverpool’s 1:53.28.Back on Thursday, at the sectional Class A diving championships, F-M’s Alessandra Manicone had a strong showing, getting to third place with 379.00 points as Cicero-North Syracuse’s Maddie Thorne won with 443 points.Grace VanBramer finished sixth with 324.10 points as Meghan Maloney, with 295.80 points, beat out Natalie Roswick (293.65) and Noelle Anthis (289.60) for ninth place.Share this:FacebookTwitterLinkedInRedditComment on this Story Tags: F-Mswimming Not only did F-M pick up 556.5 points to pull far away from runner-up Liverpool (322 points), its swimmers qualified for seven different events for the Nov. 22-23 state championships at Ithaca College.Named the meet’s Most Outstanding Swimmer, Lindsay Mathews got going in the 200-yard individual medley where, in two minutes, 10.36 seconds, she beat the state qualifying standard by more than two seconds.In that same race, Addie Antshel finished second in 2:16.47, with Kate Ottaviano (2:20.43) and Jessey Eisenhut (2:24.83) also finished in the top five.center_img Earlier in this decade, the Fayetteville-Manlius girls program was close to an empty shell, with low participation and enthusiasm.Now, though, the Hornets are unstoppable, having rolled to another Salt City Athletic Conference title and then added a fourth consecutive Section III Class A championship Friday at Nottingham High School.And this one might have proven the most impressive of all.last_img read more

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Just like eating yogurt – scientists hope to end epidemic in bats

first_imgCanadian scientists are racing to test a remedy that they hope will save bats from a deadly fungus that has already killed millions of the winged mammals across the continent.“We are feeling a real sense of urgency because that fungus is within a couple hundred kilometres of Vancouver,” said Cori Lausen, a biologist with the Wildlife Conservation Society Canada. “It’s very likely that that disease will show up there this spring.”White Nose Syndrome, already found in 31 states and five Canadian provinces, kills hibernating bats by forcing them to wake up and use energy grooming the fungus off their bodies.“Bats only have so much stored fat,” said Lausen. “Many of them will die over the winter simply from starvation.”Those that don’t, she said, often don’t last much longer. The fungus eats holes in their wings.Previous attempts to fight the fungus are based on what Lausen calls “S.O.B. — spray on bats.” Find where the bats are hibernating and spray them with some sort of fungicide, either chemical or naturally derived.That method depends on knowing where the bats hibernate. It also introduces substances into delicate cave ecosystems that might have unanticipated effects.Nor has it stopped White Nose’s spread. Although the disease has not yet appeared in Canada west of Manitoba, it was found last year just south of Vancouver near Seattle.“It became clear to me that we had to do something different in the west,” Lausen said. “If we can focus on something we can do to prepare the bats to fight off the fungus, then that’s where we would like to put our energy.”While bat hibernation sites in the west are mostly unknown, scientists do know where to find them in summer — hanging in buildings or in large maternity roosts raising their young.Lausen and her colleagues have developed a powder that contains probiotics — bacteria found naturally on bat wings that fight the fungus. That powder will be spread on entrances to bat roosts in hopes it spreads on their bodies.“(The bacteria) are already on their wings,” Lausen said. “We’re just trying to increase the density of these good bacteria and fungi.“The theory is that these bats will go off to hibernation having spent their summer going in and out and picking up this probiotic — very much like us eating yogurt. They’ll arrive at their hibernation site with wing microbes that are going to keep that fungus from growing.”The group has swabbed 14 different bacteria off bat wings that look like they’ll work.“We have proof in a petri dish.”Next, scientists have to figure out which combinations of bacteria will be best. Then they have to mass-produce it into a powder that can be tested next spring.Lausen said the hope is to have the powder in Vancouver bat roosts by the summer.“It’s all moving very quickly.”Losing bats means losing a major predator of insect pests such as mosquitoes. The little brown bat, common throughout North America, can eat its body weight in bugs every night.That not only keeps backyards and gardens more pleasant, it reduces the need for chemical pesticides, Lausen said.“A lot of pesticide use is happening in the East where White Nose has hit harder. Insect abundance goes up when natural predators go down.“And bats are the primary predator of insects in the night sky.”— Follow Bob Weber on Twitter at @row1960last_img read more

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