The New, 900-Page ‘Phish Companion’ Book Has Just Been Released

first_imgRead the book!The third volume of the Phish Companion was released today, with all proceeds going to benefit the Mockingbird Foundation. The Phish.net compendium features 898 pages of Phish glory, with setlists, song histories, jam charts, and crisp photography – most of which has never been published.In addition to all the Phish information, the book features original artwork for each chapter from some of Phish’s most beloved poster artists: Welker, Masthay, Helton, and more.For more about the Phish Companion, head to their official website and pick one up for yourself! Check out some preview images below.last_img

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Faculty host public Ferguson discussion

first_imgJason Ruiz, assistant professor of American Studies, and Dianne Pinderhughes, professor of political science and Africana Studies, hosted an open forum Monday on the recent events in Ferguson, Mo., to discuss the implications these events have on racial and societal issues.Ruiz said the forum’s timeliness supplemented discussions people should have in and out of the classroom.“I’m teaching this class, Mixed Race America, and I thought starting with Ferguson was an obvious place to start a critical exploration of race relations, and especially race relations,” Ruiz said. “I always start the class talking about ‘What is Race?’ and right now when we ask ourselves, ‘What is race?’ Ferguson is looming large in terms of the state of American race relations.”Ruiz said perceptions of race are often skewed because of media biases — something students in the social media age are especially susceptible to.“The one thing I hope we can do is demand better, more fair media portrayals,” Ruiz said. “That’s something I took away that we all had in common. My task as an educator is to create more savvy media consumers.”Ruiz said the open forum style of discussion was meant to facilitate more frank discussions on the topic of race on campus.“I think students have a lot to say, but they sometimes don’t feel empowered or like they have a critical space with faculty members to really tell us how they feel,” Ruiz said. “This is a campus that has a lot of students, faculty and staff people that are interested in issues like this and keeping the conversation going. Personally, I hope [the forum] will be the start of many conversations.”Pinderhughes said that the very fact the forum was open and without a formal presentation gave the faculty in attendance an opportunity to see what the students were thinking about the situation.“We were very pleased with the turnout and we had a very nice range of questions,” Pinderhughes said. “Seeing that not all the students were in agreement opened up a lot of different options for people to engage in action.”Senior Deandra Cadet said her peers posed educated inquiries and honed in on the issue’s relevance to the University.“A lot of people were talking about what was the next step for us that we can take to educate ourselves on these issues and also be advocates against the sort of actions that might be police brutality,” Cadet said. “I think it’s more just about what actions we can take as students.”Cadet said the public exchange of opinions and facts on Ferguson allowed students to explore how race affects them personally and facilitate the discussion of topics of equality in their own social circles.“I think having actual concrete conversations with different people about things that are important to your life can really bridge the gap, because you can know someone of a different race and not really know them or what’s important to them,” Cadet said.Tags: Ferguson, Race relationslast_img read more

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Culbreath, Scherm Honored

first_imgTwo prominent faculty members of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Albert Culbreath and Harald Scherm, have been named 2020 Fellows of the American Phytopathological Society (APS).The society grants this honor to a current APS member in recognition of distinguished contributions to plant pathology or to APS. Recognition as a Fellow is based on significant contributions in original research, teaching, administration, professional and public service, and/or extension and outreach.​“Being named a Fellow is a scientific society’s greatest honor,” said Sam Pardue, dean and director of CAES. “We are proud of Drs. Culbreath and Scherm for this outstanding recognition. It not only speaks of the excellence of their individual programs, but to the quality of the plant pathology department at UGA as well.”Albert K. Culbreath is a professor of plant pathology at the University of Georgia Tifton campus. He is recognized as a leader in the ecology, epidemiology and control of thrips-vectored tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), and of early and late leaf-spot diseases of peanut.He is an author on more than 200 journal articles and book chapters, and co-developer of five TSWV-resistant peanut cultivars.Culbreath was a co-developer of the “Tomato Spotted Wilt Risk Index” and “Peanut Rx” educational tools that ensured economic viability of peanut production when the disease threatened the industry’s existence in the 1990s. He has been an integral part of a multidisciplinary team approach to this complex problem that has produced an integrated spotted-wilt management program combining multiple suppressive factors to control the disease. Adoption of the integrated system coincided with dramatic decline in annual losses to TSWV in peanut.As a part of this work, he documented slower epidemic development in several cultivars and breeding lines than in ‘Florunner’, the predominant peanut cultivar grown in the U.S. until the early 1990s. Culbreath has characterized the field reaction to TSWV of numerous breeding lines from multiple peanut breeders. Several of those have been released as cultivars.Much of his work on integrating resistant or tolerant cultivars with suppressive cultural practices is applicable to both organic and conventional production in developing and developed countries.Most recently, Culbreath reported synergistic effects of elemental sulfur with sterol biosynthesis inhibiting (SBI) fungicides for control of late leaf spot in fields where the SBI fungicides alone provided little control. He and UGA colleague Katherine Stevenson co-authored the chapter on fungicide resistance in peanut pathogens in the recent second edition of “Fungicide Resistance in North America.” Culbreath has served as president, councilor and division forum representative of the APS Southern Division. He is a Fellow of the American Peanut Research and Education Society, and he was previously recognized with the APS Novartis Award, the UGA D.W. Brooks Award for Excellence in Research and the APS Southern Division Outstanding Plant Pathologist Award.He has also served on 41 graduate student committees and been the major professor for seven master’s degree students and four doctoral candidates. He teaches “Introductory Plant Pathology” at UGA-Tifton.Harald Scherm is department head and professor in the UGA Department of Plant Pathology. He is recognized for his pioneering research on pathogen biology, epidemiology and disease management in fruit crops, especially blueberry. He has had a career-long fascination with understanding and managing diseases with unorthodox life histories, such as mummy berry, Exobasidium leaf and fruit spot, and orange cane blotch.Scherm, who joined the UGA Department of Plant Pathology in 1996, is known for his early research on mummy berry, which elucidated the epidemiology of the disease on southern blueberries, developed a mummy-germination model to anticipate primary infection, and implemented improved fungicide schedules aligned with host and pathogen phenology. This work formed the basis for Scherm’s recognition with the Lee M. Hutchins Award in 2003 and the Julius-Kühn Prize in 2004. Subsequent research on this pathosystem shifted to host-pathogen interactions during the flower infection process and culminated in the publication of an article in the Annual Review of Phytopathologyin 2006.Scherm served as the assistant dean for research in CAES between 2010 and 2017 and has been head of the Department of Plant Pathology since July 2016. Under his leadership, the department added 11 new faculty members and the number of graduate students has reached an all-time high of 53, as of fall 2019. The UGA Department of Plant Pathology is recognized internationally for its comprehensive and integrative research and outreach portfolio, spanning basic, translational and applied programs.Scherm has authored 198 publications, trained 22 graduate students, and received UGA’s Excellence in Graduate Mentoring Award. Most recently, he took the lead in establishing UGA’s interdisciplinary graduate certificate program in Agricultural Data Science, for which he currently serves as the coordinator.He served APS on numerous committees, on the editorial boards of Phytopathology and Plant Disease, and is currently providing leadership for Phytopathology as the journal’s editor-in-chief.“This is a well-deserved honor for two outstanding scientists and earned recognition of the international-quality science that emanates from the UGA plant pathology department,” said Allen Moore, CAES associate dean of research. “It is especially gratifying to see scientists from both our foundational and applied research areas recognized at this exceptional level, demonstrating the balanced strength of UGA agricultural research.”last_img read more

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Email marketing DOs and DON’Ts

first_img continue reading » 10SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Email marketing is a great and cost-effective way to reach your target audience—both prospects and current customers for cross selling opportunities. When done correctly, it can yield astounding results. No, really—66% of consumers have reported that they’ve made a purchase as a result of an email they received. Tweet this stat!So if your financial institution hasn’t jumped aboard the email marketing train yet, you might want to consider it, but before you do, there are a few rules and regulations you should be aware of.The CAN-SPAM Act enacted by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), defines the laws for business entities that email consumers, lays out recipient rights, and defines penalties for breaking the law. When it comes to complying with CAN-SPAM laws, there are two kinds of messages—transactional and commerical. A transactional message includes information such as account statements, product recall information, updates to terms or policies, etc.last_img read more

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Syracuse football recruiting: OL Patrick Davis becomes 3rd 2017 commit with Canadian ties

first_imgClass of 2017 offensive lineman Patrick Davis has verbally committed to Syracuse, according to multiple reports. Scout.com first reported the news.The 6-foot-5, 290-pound Davis is unranked by major recruiting services.Davis is the 17th commit overall and second offensive lineman in the class. He’s also the third commit in the class with ties to Canada, joining linebacker Tyrell Richards and wide receiver Josh Palmer.Davis attends Champlain Regional College in Lennoxville, Quebec and is listed as an offensive guard. He also had offers from Buffalo and North Dakota State, per Scout.Watch Davis’ highlights below and track Syracuse’s 2017 class, here.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text Comments Related Stories Syracuse football recruiting: Track the Class of 2017Class of 2017 linebacker Tyrell Richards commits to SyracuseClass of 2017 3-star wide receiver Joshua Palmer commits to SyracuseSyracuse football recruiting: 2017 OL Dakota Davis commits to OrangeSyracuse football recruiting: Breaking down the 7 players who committed in a 9-day flurry Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on August 6, 2016 at 9:02 pm Contact Paul: [email protected] | @pschwedslast_img read more

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Current India team can beat anyone: Kapil Dev

first_imgAhead of India’s high-profile South Africa tour, former captain Kapil Dev on Thursday said the current side are at a level to beat any team.Following the ongoing series against Sri Lanka at home, India are slated to visit South Africa for three Tests, six One-Day Internationals (ODI) and three Twenty20 Internationals in January.”I think the team has reached a level where they can beat anyone,” the 58-year-old said at an event.”Be it South Africa..or Australia, I think we have a captain who understands how the team functions,” added the country’s first World Cup-winning skipper.The legendary all-rounder emphasised on the fact that India are going to face a problem of plenty, with many young talents to be picked up from.”The only problem that the team is going to face is that whom they are going to pick in the playing XI, as we have a very strong bench,” Dev said.last_img read more

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