Watch Nikki Glaspie Super Jam Tear Up The Gap Band’s “Humpin’” On Jam Cruise [Pro-Shot]

first_imgThe magical musical experience that is Jam Cruise will be setting sails next January, when Jam Cruise 16 takes over the Norwegian Jade from January 17th through 22nd. After it embarks from Miami, Florida, the cruise will round through Roatan, Honduras, and Grand Cayman during its weeklong circuit. One of the benefits of Jam Cruise and what makes it such a highly anticipated event each year is the intimacy provided by being trapped on a boat in the middle of the ocean with your favorite musicians—the event is chockful of awesome collaborations that are unlikely to go down elsewhere due to the fact that such huge name musicians rarely gather together will open schedules specifically for hanging out and making music.Watch Nikki Glaspie Crush Vocals On “Killing In The Name” With Galactic On Jam Cruise [Pro-Shot]One huge moment from this year’s Jam Cruise was The Nth Power’s Nikki Glaspie’s supergroup dubbed the Nikki Glaspie Super Jam. Today, Jam Cruise released new footage of the super jam getting down on The Gap Band’s “Humpin’.” This sweet collaboration went down on the last day of Jam Cruise on January 24th of this year on the Pool Deck. In the pro-shot video, you can see DJ Williams of Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe and Adam “Shmeeans” Smirnoff of Lettuce holding down guitar duties with Tony Hall on bass. Ivan Neville takes on the vocal duties for the number, with Joey Porter taking over toward the end of the video on talkbox. In addition to Neville and Porter, Nigel Hall also accompanies the duo on keys. You can check out the video for yourself below to get stoked for next year’s Jam Cruise, which is bound to have similarly all-star collaborations across its trip. You can check out this year’s massive Jam Cruise lineup here, and get more information about the event on its website here.last_img read more

Read more

State-of-the-art wind tunnel advances hypersonic flight research

first_imgCourtesy of Andrew Bustard The Notre Dame Hypersonic Aerodynamics Lab unveiled a quiet Mach 6 hypersonic tunnel in 2018. Since then, the department has continued to pursue innovation in flight technology.Thomas Juliano, assistant professor of aerospace and mechanical engineering, established the lab and began the project in August 2014. Juliano said his motivation behind the project is the possibility of hypersonic flight in the future. “The story of transportation for the last 2,000 years has been finding ways to go faster and faster,” Juliano said. “This is merely the latest step in that.”Juliano previously worked with a smaller-scale quiet wind tunnel as a graduate student at Purdue University before coming to Notre Dame. “We can do a lot with that, but we want to be able to test longer models in order to see more of what’s going on,” Juliano said. “The logical next step for facility development in order to unlock these other investigations in fluid mechanics was to build a larger-scale item.”Challenges for hypersonic flight include extremely high temperatures that surround aircraft when going thousands of miles per hour, said first-year doctoral student Andrew Bustard. “The high-heating rates, if not designed around, will destroy your vehicle,” Bustard said. “Obviously, we don’t want that. But the flow physics is so complex that we don’t actually understand fully what’s causing the heating or the best way to reduce it, so the whole point of this group is to study the flow around objects around potential or get a better understanding of the flow around high-speed objects.”The Mach 6 quiet wind tunnel is unique as it better replicates the silent noise that occurs in the atmosphere, Bustard said. “Most facilities we have on the ground have way more noise than in the atmosphere,” Bustard said. “If we truly want to model the heating in the atmosphere, we need to have flow in our wind tunnel that represents those atmospheric conditions. [The quiet tunnel] better matches the atmosphere, and that’s why it’s very useful for us.”The Mach 6 tunnel project has provided opportunities for multiple engineering students to get involved in hypersonic research. Erik Hoberg, a third-year doctoral student, specializes in flow characterization and wind tunnel design. He has been involved in the project for a little over a year. ”I was not part of [Juliano’s] group when I came to Notre Dame,” Hoberg said. “Then I met him and saw what his group was doing and really wanted to be on that project.”Fifth-year doctoral candidate Carson Running has helped with the quiet tunnel since his first year of graduate school. He worked heavily on the design and building of the tunnel in the early years of the project. “One question that I researched was the best way to heat the large surface area [of the wind tunnel],” Running said. “We actually found a company down in Texas that sells these big long heating blankets that can just be wrapped around the steel portions of the wind tunnel and set to a certain temperature that we desire.”Running spoke to the challenges of designing a state-of-the-art quiet tunnel that can advance the progress of hypersonic flight.  “A lot of the problems we’re trying to solve from small to big haven’t really been solved before, so overcoming that was … doing a lot of research but also a ton of collaboration and meetings with professor Juliano, using his expertise and kind of working together,” Running said. “One thing that I always like that [Juliano] says when he assigns projects or assignments to us is, ‘I wouldn’t be assigning them to you if I knew how to do them.’ He really does need our help and is willing to work with us and bounce ideas off of each other.”Tags: aerospace engineering, Wind tunnel Faculty and students at the Notre Dame Hypersonic Aerodynamics Lab unveiled the largest quiet Mach 6 hypersonic wind tunnel in the United States on Nov. 30, 2018. Nearly a year later, the lab continues to apply the technology to the future of flying.last_img read more

Read more

Bonsignore: Kobe Bryant career arc runs gamut of emotions

first_imgThe Kobe Bryant transition from that feared, steely-eyed assassin we all remember for most of his career to the approachable, vulnerable, human version we see now isn’t really the overnight phenomena we might think.For me, the changeover began two years ago in, of all places, Santa Barbara.But more on that in a bit. As we watch the final act of one of the most brilliant sports careers play out in mutual smiles and hugs and embraces and adoration and respect and love, the dichotomy is as shocking as it is welcoming. Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error This wasn’t a close-to-finished 20-something-year-old college prospect. It was a talented but raw teenager who literally grew up before our very eyes.And as the next 20 years unfolded, he amazed us, angered us, provided unparalleled joy and a fair share of frustration.He made us smile, but also grimace.We lifted him in celebration, but we sometimes had to apologize for him.He earned our respect, but he tested our patience.He was supremely talented, committed and driven. But he was also unbending, relentless and unrepentant.In the 30 or so years I’ve observed Los Angeles sports, I can’t think of an athlete who tapped into every one of our emotions as completely and deeply as Kobe Bryant.Sometimes in the course of a 48-minute basketball game.And it wasn’t exclusive to his fans or haters.Kobe inspired teammates and coaches, but also challenged them. He was blunt, demanding and drove a hard bargain with anyone who dared coach him or play with him. Some people reacted better than others to it. And for every player who accepted the challenge of playing with Kobe, there were two others who avoided it.It was part of what made him one of the greatest to play the game.But also why he was never truly loved like some of the greats who came before him.Magic drove a stake in your heart with a smile, then offered a hand to lift you back up.Kobe took pleasure in your demise, and his role in crafting it.It was easy to love him.But almost as difficult not to hate him.As we’ve witnessed over the course of Kobe’s final act this year, the unyielding Kobe has given way to a likable, endearing one.Like an old-time gunslinger who retired his six-shooter for a peaceful life of leisure, Kobe now leans back on a chair on his porch with a welcoming smile.And as the fear for him dissipates, the respect and admiration grows. Fans and opponents are no longer apprehensive about showering him with it, and he seems genuinely pleased to receive it.Arc complete.But this is no overnight phenomenon.A couple years ago, I went up to Santa Barbara to talk to Kobe at his annual youth basketball camp. It was the eve of free agency, and the Lakers were in desperate need of reinforcements to help Kobe maximize the final years of his career.I fully expected a snarling Kobe demanding Lakers general manager Mitch Kupchack and team president Jim Buss bring in help. And if not, there would be hell to pay.Instead, I found a Kobe almost resigned to the fact the necessary improvements would not be coming. And one who seemed OK his last two years wouldn’t be chasing championships, but trying to mentor young players to help point the Lakers back in the right direction.There was no blame, no anger to be found.If they signed an impact player, great. If not, that’s OK too.“It won’t be for a lack of effort.” he said, promising he was on board with whatever the Lakers managed.A younger Bryant would have had a different outlook.But with age and maturity and five championship and an unquestioned legacy as one of the greats in the game firmly in place — not to mention a body that was breaking down — Bryant was beginning to see things differently.It’s refreshing, actually, to see the transformation.As it is now, with fans and opponents no longer apprehensive about showering Kobe with love.And Kobe absolutely loving every minute of it.center_img Even in his own city, the balance between love and hate and understanding and misunderstanding teetered remarkably equally for an iconic player who delivered five championships to a treasured Los Angeles franchise and never once approached his craft without the preparation, mindset, willingness and skill to be the best player of all time.To say nothing of the fans in other cities, for whom ripping out their hearts was a particular pleasure for Kobe. The hate for him was particularly fierce as a result, although you always got the feeling Kobe reveled in it.So, to see the outpour of love this year as Kobe bids farewell, and the utter enjoyment he derives from it, is a bit of a jolt to our senses.A beautiful, unexpected, almost unfathomable one at that. What we are witnessing is the completion of a life arc. Kobe arrived in Los Angeles in 1996 a 17-year-old kid and is leaving as he approaches middle age.last_img read more

Read more