Kazakh authorities harass opposition journalist

first_img January 15, 2021 Find out more March 17, 2020 Kazakh authorities harass opposition journalist Regional newspaper editor harassed after investigating real estate scandal February 5, 2021 Find out more RSF_en Organisation News News Receive email alerts Reporters Without Borders (RSF) calls on the Kazakh authorities to stop harassing Inga Imanbay, an opposition journalist who has been assaulted while trying to film her husband’s arrest, forced to resign as a newspaper editor, and named during a colleague’s illegal interrogation. Those who attacked her must be brought to justice, RSF said.The police have done nothing in response to the complaint Imanbay filed on 1 March about the attack, although the deadline for them to take action has expired. Imanbay, who is several months pregnant, was attacked during the arrest of her husband, Zhanbolat Mamay, a former journalist who is one of a new opposition party’s founders.When Imanbay tried to use her phone to film the men – plainclothes policemen, according to Imanbay – who came to take her husband to a police station to prevent him attending a demonstration, the phone was snatched out of her hands, although she had shown her press card, and her head was slammed against a metal fence.As a result, she had to seek emergency medical attention at a hospital for a slight concussion.Imanbay had been appointed editor of the independent daily Zhas Alash in early January but was sidelined from this position and, as a result, forced to resign on 20 February, shortly before demonstrations in support of Democratic Choice of Kazakhstan (DVK), the new party of which her husband had assumed the leadership.Imanbay said she was sidelined under pressure from the authorities because of her articles about former President Nursultan Nazarbayev and his family, and because of her husband’s new role.“Inga Imanbay is being subjected to full-blown harassment,” said Jeanne Cavelier, the head of RSF’s Eastern Europe and Central Asia desk. “We call on the Kazakh authorities to respect their international obligations by conducting a transparent and effective investigation into the attack against her and by bringing those responsible to trial.“Free media are essential for a democratic debate and for the credibility of the reformist discourse employed by Kassym-Jomart Tokayev, who has been president for nearly a year. Not to speak of the requirement on government to guarantee journalists’ safety.”The police are also planning to open a criminal investigation into a Zhas Alash article about former President Nazarbayev for “inciting social hatred.” This is what they told the article’s author, Askhat Akhan, when they interrogated him on 29 February without his lawyer being present. They wanted to know if Imanbay had commissioned the article.The police prevented several journalists from covering a day of protest in support of the new opposition party on 22 February. Kazakhstan is ranked 158th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2019 World Press Freedom Index. to go furthercenter_img Follow the news on Kazakhstan News Help by sharing this information Reporters prevented from covering Kazakh parliamentary elections KazakhstanEurope – Central Asia Condemning abusesProtecting journalists ImpunityFreedom of expressionJudicial harassment News Kazakh reporter accuses police of attacking her KazakhstanEurope – Central Asia Condemning abusesProtecting journalists ImpunityFreedom of expressionJudicial harassment October 30, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

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Jevon McFerrin Steps into Hamilton’s Title Role

first_imgJevon McFerrin Jevon McFerrin, who has portrayed the titular role in Hamilton as an alternate to headliner Javier Muñoz, will step into the role beginning on February 23. Muñoz is taking a medical leave to recover from a physical injury and will return to the production following his recuperation.McFerrin previously appeared on Broadway and on the national tour of Motown. He joins the growing number of accomplished actors to depict America’s Founding Father and first Treasury Secretary in Hamilton. Miguel Cervantes heads the cast in Chicago, and Michael Luwoye (the title character’s previous alternate) is Hamilton in the national touring company opening next month in San Francisco. Muñoz himself performed as the alternate to Hamilton creator and the musical’s original star, Lin Manuel-Miranda before taking over the role last year. Jon Rua, a returning member of the original cast, and Donald Webber Jr. will perform as McFerrin’s alternates.McFerrin joins a cast that includes Brandon Victor Dixon as Aaron Burr, Mandy Gonzalez as Angelica Schuyler, Lexi Lawson as Eliza Schuyler, Alysha Deslorieux as Peggy Schuyler and Maria Reynolds, Bryan Terrell Clark as George Washington, Taran Killam as King George III and J. Quinton Johnson as Hercules Mulligan and James Madison. Anthony Lee Medina will take on the role of John Laurens and Philip Hamilton in March, stepping in for Jordan Fisher. Hamilton Related Showscenter_img from $149.00 View Commentslast_img read more

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Changes to ‘Know Before You Owe’ mortgage rules finalized

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr by: Lydia WheelerThe Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) has finalized some changes to its “Know Before You Owe” mortgage rules.The new rule, gives creditors more time to draft disclosure forms. Now, creditors have three days to provide a revised loan estimate once a consumer locks in a floating interest rate. Previously, the loan estimates were due on the day the rate was locked.Another change will give creditors more leeway in revising estimates for construction loans. Because construction loans take longer to settle than other loans, the CFPB said estimated charges often change. Under the new rule, there is a space on the loan estimate form where creditors can notify consumers they could receive a revised estimate if the loan does not settle in 60 days.“The new ‘Know Before You Owe’ mortgage forms improve consumer understanding, aid comparison shopping, and help prevent closing table surprises for consumers,” CFPB Director Richard Cordray said in a news release on Tuesday. continue reading »last_img read more

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Partridge blasts ignorant agents

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Where Are Transport Inspectors?

first_imgHundreds of Monrovia commuters have begun asking the Ministry of Transport (MOT), where are transport Inspectors?Early last week, the Ministries of Transport and Commerce and Industry (MOCI) announced the deployment of Transport Inspectors to monitor transport fares in Monrovia.In a three-hour encounter with commuters on Monday at several points in Monrovia, commuters claimed that MOT’s Inspectors have not been seen.As a result, commercial drivers have increased transport fares for all destinations.It is not known whether the MOT and MOCI have developed some mechanisms that could monitor activities of Transport Inspectors in Monrovia and its environs.At the various bus stations and other taxi cab parking areas, intense arguments took place between commuters and commercial bus drivers.Some commuters alleged that they were charged LD100 instead of LD60 from Red-light Market in Paynesville to Broad Street. Others charge LD80.“We continue to remain perpetual victims at the hands of some commercial and other transport service providers in Monrovia and its environs,” commuter Thomas Hansen Diggs lamented.In exclusive interviews with the Daily Observer at the corner of Broad and Buchanan Streets, Diggs insisted that efforts to enforce approved transport fares must claim the attention of the Ministry of Transport.Mrs. Elizabeth B. Davis, 55, at the corner of Randall and Broad Streets pointed out that MOT needs strong measures to ensure compliance.According to Lawrence B. Smith, 64, of Duala General Market on Bushrod Island in Monrovia, since the weekend he had not seen any of MOT’s Transport Inspectors at bus stations.“I want MOT and MOCI representatives, especially the Assistant Ministers and directors, to come and see things for themselves at our bus and parking stations,” Mrs. Davis said.When contacted, the Director of the Transport Inspectorate Division, Joseph K. Roberts, explained that the MOT has withdrawn the inspectors due to the uncooperative attitude of police officers to effect arrest and enforcement.Director Roberts explained that the MOT cannot place its inspectors at risk when the LNP has the responsibility to enforce transport fare regulations.He also disclosed that a communication has been submitted to his bosses for their intervention and that of the LNP’s Director General, Col. Chris Massaquoi.For their part, LNP officers at some bus stations and street corners, who asked not to be named, on Tuesday categorically denied the MOT inspectors’ claim that police officers are not cooperating.  Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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High turnout on Saturday morning for Letterkenny Parkrun – Pic Special

first_imgA large number of runners took part in this week’s Letterkenny Parkrun. Congrats to Helen McCloskey who ran her 27th Parkrun today.Helen has just retired from her post as Chief Medical scientist of the Microbiology Laboratory at Letterkenny University Hospital where she worked for past 36 years.McCloskey is now a regular Saturday morning Park runner and volunteer and is aiming for 50th Parkrun milestone. The organisers would also like to thank all those who contributed on May 18.Letterkenny Parkrun is free to enter with parking free until 11am. The 5k starts at 09.30 and you can walk, jog or run and then enjoy a tea or coffee in the vestry afterwards.Everyone is welcome.Photos from Peadar McDaid below. High turnout on Saturday morning for Letterkenny Parkrun – Pic Special was last modified: May 18th, 2019 by Shaun KeenanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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What we learned in the Warriors’ blowout loss to the Bucks

first_imgThey succeeded.Milwaukee took the first of two regular-season meetings between the teams 134-111 Thursday, opening up a lead as large as 29 points on the defending champions.Giannis … Well, that’s about as poorly as the Warriors have played in the last five years.And they did it on their home court, no less.With no Draymond Green in the linuep, the Warriors were run off the Oracle Arena court Thursday by a hungry and talented Bucks team that was aiming to make a statement.last_img

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TelePresence: meetings without travel

first_img14 October 2009South African telecommunications operator Neotel has launched the first TelePresence facility in Africa, making a virtual “public room” available for businesses to interact with their global counterparts.TelePresence, which uses Cisco technology, integrates advanced audio, high-definition video and interactive elements to deliver “a virtual meeting experience that feels real”.Neotel says it has introduced the value-added service in response to continued global economic pressures resulting in organisations looking for ways to cut down on overseas corporate travelling in particular.“The launch of this TelePresence facility is in line with Tata Communications’ global strategy to launch more of these facilities across the globe this year,” Neotel MD Ajay Pandey said in a statement late last month.By working closely with Tata Communications, Neotel is able to tap into their global network, providing South Africans with true global connectivity.“We see this as a wonderful opportunity to enable our customers’ businesses by providing them with access to a solution that will streamline operations and reduce travel time and associated costs,” Pandey said.Reducing business costsIn a recent report, research firm Gartner predicted that, due to the current world economic crisis, high-definition based video meeting solutions would negatively affect the global travel industry.Locally, businesses are looking to reduce operational costs and are reducing their travel budgets significantly, says Neotel.TelePresence creates the perception that the different parties are sitting in the same room, having a face-to-face meeting, without having to travel to the meeting.“This means the effective use of this technology will save time and money,” said Pandey. “The business case associated with TelePresence is phenomenal.”SAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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South African English is lekker!

first_imgSouth Africans speak English, but that doesn’t mean you’ll always understand us. Our “robots” are nothing like R2D2, “just now” doesn’t mean immediately, and “babbelas” is not a shampoo. Here’s an informal guide to our weirder words.“Bunny chow” is a curry served in a hollowed-out loaf of bread. It is usually eaten with the fingers, not a knife and fork. (Image: Brand South Africa)South African English has a flavour all its own, borrowing freely from Afrikaans, which is similar to Dutch and Flemish, as well as from the country’s many African languages. Other words come from Indian, Malay and colonial Portuguese influences.Note: In many words derived from Afrikaans, the letter “g” is pronounced in the same way as the “ch” in the Scottish “loch” or the German “achtung” – a kind of growl at the back of the throat. In the pronunciation guides below, the spelling for this sound is given as “gh”.Aabba: Carry a child secured to one’s back with a blanket. From the Khoi-San.amasi: [pronounced “um-ah-see”] A popular drink of thick sour milk. From isiZulu. An alternative name is maas.apartheid: [ap-art-hate] Literally “apart-ness” in Afrikaans, apartheid was the policy of racial separation, and the resulting oppression of the black majority, implemented by the National Party from 1948 to 1990.Read more: A short history of South Africaag: [agh] Generally used at the beginning of a sentence, to express resignation or irritation, as in: “Ag no man! What did you do that for?”Bbabbelas: [bub-buh-luss] A hangover.bagel: [bay-gell] An overly groomed materialistic young man, and the male version of a kugel.bakgat: [buck-ghut] Well done, cool, awesome.bakkie: [buck-ee] A pick-up truck.bergie: : [bear-ghee] From the Afrikaans berg, “mountain”, originally referring to vagrants who sheltered in the forests of Cape Town’s Table Mountain and now a word for anyone who is down and out.biltong: [bill-tong] This South African favourite is dried and salted meat, similar to beef jerky, although it can be made from ostrich, kudu or any other red meat.Read more: South African cuisinebioscope: A cinema or movie theatre, originally a defunct international English word that has survived longer in South Africa because of the influence of the Afrikaans, bioskoop.biscuit: In South Africa a cookie is known as a “biscuit”. The word is also a term of affection, as in, “Hey, you biscuit”.bliksem: To beat up, hit or punch; or a mischievous person.blooming: [blimmin] A variation on “very”, as in, “That new bakkie is blimmin big.”bobotie: [buh-boor-tee] A dish of Malay origin, made with minced meat and spices, and topped with an egg sauce.boerewors: [boor-uh-vors] Literally, “farmer’s sausage”. A savoury sausage developed by the Boers – today’s Afrikaners – some 200 years ago, boerewors is South African food at its most traditional.boet: [like “book”, with a t] A term of affection, from the Afrikaans for “brother”.boma: [bow-mah] An open thatched structure used for dinners, entertainment and parties.bonsella: Surprise gift, something extra, or a bribe. From isiZulu.born frees: South Africans who were born into a democratic South Africa – that is, after 1994.bosberaad: [borse-bah-raad] A strategy meeting or conference, usually held in a remote bushveld location, such as a game farm.bottle store: liquor store, off-licence.braai: [br-eye] An outdoor barbecue, where meat such as steak, chicken and boerewors are cooked, served with pap and bredie.bredie: [brear-dee] A traditional South African mutton stew, first brought to the country by Malay immigrants. It now refers to any kind of stew.bru: [brew] A term of affection, shortened from Afrikaans broer, meaning “brother”. An example would be, “Hey, my bru, howzit?”bunny chow: Delicious and cheap food on the go, bunny chow is curry served in a hollowed-out half-loaf of bread, generally sold in greasy-spoon cafes.bushveld: [bush-felt] Taken from the Afrikaans bosveld [“bush field”], the bushveld is a terrain of thick scrubby trees and bush in dense thickets, with grassy groundcover between.Ccafe: [kaf-ay, kaff-ee or kayff] The ubiquitous small neighbourhood convenience store, often found on street corners and stocking cigarettes, cold drinks and newspapers.chill bru: Relax, my mate. Take it easy.china: To most people, China is the world’s most populous country, but to a South African it can mean something entirely different. China means “good friend”, as in, “This oke’s my china”. It’s one of the few Cockney rhyming slang words to survive in the country, coming from “china plate” = “mate”.chommie: Friend, from the English, “chum”.cooldrink, colddrink: This is the common term for a soda, such as Coca-Cola. Ask for “a soda” in South Africa, and you will receive a club soda.Ddassie: The rock hyrax, a small herbivore that lives in mountainous habitats and is reputed to be the species mostly closely related to the elephant. The name comes from the Afrikaans das, meaning “badger”.Read more: South Africa’s wildlife wondersdeurmekaar: [dee-oor-muh-car] Afrikaans for confused, disorganised or stupid, as in, “He’s a bit deurmekaar“.dinges: [ding-us] A thing, thingamabob, whatzit, whatchamacallit or whatsizname, as in, “When is dinges coming around?”doek: [like book] A head scarf worn to protect a woman’s hair.dolos: Interlocking blocks of concrete in an H-shape, with one arm rotated through 90º. The dolos is a South African invention used to protect seawalls and preserve beaches from erosion. The name comes from the Afrikaans word for the knuckle bones in an animal’s leg. The plural is dolosse.Read more: South Africa’s wave-breaking dolossedonga: A natural ditch resulting from severe soil erosion. From the isiZulu for “wall”.donner: [dor-nuh] Beat up. From the Afrikaans donder, meaning “thunder”.dop: [dawp] An alcoholic drink: “Can I pour you a dop?” It can also mean failure: “I dopped the test.”dorp: A small town on the platteland.droewors: [droo-uh-vors] Dried boerewors, similar to biltong.dummy: A baby’s pacifier.dumpie: A South African beer served in a brown 340ml bottle.Durbs: The city of Durban.Read more: Head for the Durban beachfrontdwaal: [dwarl] Lack of concentration or focus: “Sorry, I was in a bit of a dwaal. Could you repeat that?”Eeina: [ay-nuh or ay-nar] Ouch! Can also mean “sore”.eish: [aysh] Used to express surprise, wonder, frustration or outrage: “Eish! That cut was eina!”FFixed up: Used to mean “that’s good” or “sorted”. Example: “Let’s meet at the restaurant.” The reply: “Fixed up.”flog: No whips implied. South Africans use flog to mean “sell”, as in, “I think it’s time I flogged this old car.”frikkadel: [frik-kuh-dell] A traditional meatball.fundi: [foon-dee] Expert. From the Nguni, umfundisi, meaning “teacher” or “preacher”.fynbos: [fayn-baws] “Fine bush” in Afrikaans, fynbos is a vegetation type unique to the Cape Floral Region, a Unesco World Heritage Site. Made up of some 6 000 plant species, including many types of protea.Ggatvol: [ghut-foll] Taken from Afrikaans, this means “fed up”, as in “Jislaaik, my china, I’m gatvol of working in this hot sun.” Translation: “Gee, my friend, I’m fed up with working in this hot sun.”gogga, goggo: [gho-gha or gho-gho] Insect, bug. From the Khoikhoi xo-xon.gogo: [goh-goh] Grandmother or elderly woman, from isiZulu.graze: Eat.Hhang of: Very or big, as in, “It’s hang of a difficult”, or, “I had a hang of a problem”.hanepoot: [haa-nah-poort] A sweet wine made from the muscat blanc d’Alexandrie grape cultivar.hap: [hup] Taste, bite, as in, “Take a hap of this”.hey: This popular expression can be used as a standalone question meaning “pardon” or “what”, as in, “Hey? What did you say?” Or it can be used to prompt affirmation or agreement, as in, “It was a great film, hey?”homelands: The spurious “independent” states in which black South Africans were forced to take citizenship under the policy of apartheid. Also known as bantustans.howzit: A traditional South African greeting that translates roughly as “How are you?”, “How are things?”, or simply “Hello”.Iindaba: [in-daa-bah] A conference or expo, from the isiZulu word meaning “a matter for discussion”.inyanga : A traditional herbalist and healer.is it: [as one word: izit] An expression frequently used in conversation and equivalent to, “Is that so?”Jja: [yaa] Yes.jawelnofine: Literally, “yes, well, no, fine”, all scrunched into a single word and similar to the rhetorical expression, “How about that?”jislaaik: [yis-like] An expression of outrage or surprise: “Jislaaik, I just saw Elvis!”jol: [jawl] A versatile word with many meanings, including “party”, “disco”, “having fun”, or just “thing”.Jozi: [jo-zee] The city of Johannesburg, South Africa’s largest city, which is also known as Joburg or Joeys.just now: If a South African tells you they will do something “just now”, they mean they’ll do it in the near future – not immediately, as in, “I’ll do the dishes just now.”Kkasie: [kaa-see] Shortened form of lokasie, “location” in Afrikaans, the older word for township. Refers to the low-income dormitory suburbs outside cities and towns to which black South Africans were confined during the apartheid era.khaya: [k-eye-ya] Home. From the Nguni group of languages.kif: Cool, neat, great or wonderful. From the Arabic kayf, meaning enjoyment or wellbeing.knobkierie: [k-nob-kee-ree] A fighting stick with a knob on the business end. From the Afrikaans knop [“knob”] and the Khoi-San kirri or keeri, meaning “stick”.koeksister: [kook-sister] A traditional Malay and now also Afrikaner sweet, made from twisted yeast dough, deep fried and dipped in syrup. The right-wing enclave of Orania in the Northern Cape even has its own statue to the koeksister. The word comes from the Dutch koek (“cake”) and sissen, meaning “to sizzle”.koki: [koh-key] A coloured marker or felt-tip pen.koppie: [kor-pie] A small hill.kraal: An enclosure for livestock, or a rural village of huts surrounded by a stockade. The word may come from the Portuguese curral [“corral”], or from the Dutch kraal, meaning bead, as in the beads of a necklace – kraals are generally round in shape.kugel: [koo-gell] An overly groomed materialistic young woman, from the Yiddish for a plain pudding garnished as a delicacy. A bagel is the male variety.kwaito: [kw-eye-toe] The music of South Africa’s urban black youth, a mixture of South African disco, hip hop, R&B, ragga, and a heavy dose of house music beats.Read more: Kwaito: much more than musickwela: [kw-eh-la] A popular form of township music from the 1950s, based on the pennywhistle, a cheap and simple instrument taken up by street performers. The term kwela comes from the isiZulu for “get up”, though in township slang it also referred to the police vans, the kwela-kwela. It is said that the young men who played the pennywhistle on street corners also acted as lookouts to warn those drinking in illegal shebeens of the arrival of the cops.Read more: South African musicLlaatlammetjie: [laart-lum-et-chie] The youngest child of a family, born [mostly by accident] to older parents and many years younger than its siblings. The word means “late lamb” in Afrikaans.laduma!: [la-doo-mah] A popular cheer celebrating goals scored at soccer matches, from the isiZulu for “it thunders”.Read more: Soccer in South Africalappie: [luppie] A cleaning cloth.lekgotla: [lek-ghot-lah] A planning or strategy session.lekker: [lekk-irr with a rolling r] Nice, good, great, cool or tasty.MMadiba: [muh-dee-buh] An affectionate name for former President Nelson Mandela, and the name of his clan.Read more: Nelson Mandelamake a plan: devise a way to overcome difficulties. “Leave it to me, I’ll make a plan.”mal: [mull] Mad, from Afrikaans.mampara: [mum-puh-rah] An idiot, a silly person. From the Sotho languages.mampoer: [mum-poo-er] Extremely potent brandy made from peaches or other fruit, similar to American moonshine. See witblitz.Marmite: Trade name of a dark-coloured spread made from vegetable extract and used on bread or toast.mealie: [pronounce mih-lih] Maize or corn. A mealie is a maize cob, and mealie meal is maize meal, the staple diet of South Africa, which is mostly cooked into pap. From the Afrikaans mielie.moegoe: [moo-ghoo] A fool, buffoon, idiot or simpleton.mossie: [morse-ee] Common name of the Cape sparrow, also applied to the house sparrow, and sometimes used to refer to any small undistinguished wild bird.muti : [moo-ti] Medicine, typically traditional African medicine. From the isiZulu, umuthi.Read more: Joburg’s king of muti museumMzansi: [m-zun-zee] A popular word for South Africa.Nnaartjie: [nar-chee] The South African word for tangerine, Citrus reticulata.nappy: A baby’s diaper.nca: Fine, beautiful. Pronounced with a downward click of the tongue.ne: [neh] “Really?” or “is that so?” Often used sarcastically.now-now: Shortly, in a bit, as in, “I’ll be there now-now.”Ooke, ou: A man, similar to “guy” or “bloke”. The word “ou” [oh] can be used interchangeably.Ppap: [pup] The staple food of South Africa, a porridge made from mealie meal (maize meal) cooked with water and salt to a fairly stiff consistency, stywepap being the stiffest. “Pap” can also mean weak or tired.papsak: [pup-suck] Cheap box wine sold in its foil container, without the box.pasop: [pus-orp] An Afrikaans word meaning “beware” or “watch out”.pavement: South Africans walk on pavements and drive cars on the road [at least that’s the idea]. The pavement is the sidewalk.piet-my-vrou: [peet-may-frow] The red-chested cuckoo, Cuculus solitarus. The name, an approximation of the bird’s call, literally means “Peter my wife” in Afrikaans.platteland: [plutt-uh-lunt] Farmland, countryside. Literally flat land in Afrikaans, it now refers to any rural area in which agriculture takes place, including the mountainous Cape winelands.potjiekos: [poi-chee-kors] Traditional Afrikaner food, generally a rich stew, cooked in a three-legged cast-iron pot over a fire. The word means “little-pot food” in Afrikaans.puffadder: A viper or adder of the species Britis arietans. From the Afrikaans pofadder.Rrand: The South African currency, which is made up of 100 cents. The name comes from the Witwatersrand (Dutch for “white waters ridge”), the region in Gauteng province in which most of the country’s gold deposits are found.robots: Traffic lights.rock up: To arrive somewhere unannounced or uninvited. It’s the kind of thing friends do: “I was going to go out but then my china rocked up.”rooibos: [roy-borss] Afrikaans for red bush, this popular South African tea made from the Cyclopia genistoides bush is gaining worldwide popularity for its health benefits.rooinek: [roy-neck] South Africans of British origin, from the Afrikaans for red neck, but without the connotations given the term in the US. It was first coined by Afrikaners decades ago to refer to immigrant British, whose white necks were particularly prone to sunburn.rubbish bin: Alternatively dustbin or dirt bin. Garbage can.Ssamoosa: [suh-moo-suh] A small, spicy, triangular-shaped pie deep-fried in oil. Originally made by the Indian and Malay communities, samoosas – known as samosas in Britain – are popular with all South Africans.sangoma: [sun-go-mah] Traditional healer or diviner.sarmie: Sandwich.scale, scaly: To “scale something” means to steal it. A “scaly person” is not to be trusted.shame: Broadly denotes sympathetic feeling. A South African admiring a baby, kitten or puppy might say, “Ag shame!”, to emphasise its cuteness.sharp: Often doubled up for effect as sharp- sharp! , this word is used as a greeting, a farewell, for agreement, or just to express enthusiasm.shebeen: A township tavern, illegal under the apartheid regime, often set up in a private house and frequented by black South Africans. The word is originally Gaelic.shongololo: Large brown millipede, from the isiZulu ukushonga, meaning “to roll up”.sjambok: [sham-bok] A stout leather whip made from animal hide.skebenga: [ska-beng-gah] Gangster, crook, criminal. From the Nguni word for gangster. See also skelm or skollie.skelm: [skellem] A shifty or untrustworthy person; a criminal.skinner: [skinner] Gossip, from Afrikaans. A person who gossips is known as a skinnerbek: “Jislaaik, bru, I’m going to donner that skinnerbek for skinnering about me.” Translation: “Gee, my friend, I’m going to hit that guy for gossiping about me.”skollie: [skoh-li] Gangster, criminal, from the Greek skolios, meaning crooked.skop, skiet en donner: [skorp, skeet en donner] Action movie. Taken from Afrikaans, it literally means “kick, shoot and beat up”.skrik: Fright. “I caught a big skrik” means, “I got a big fright”.skrik vir niks: Scared of nothing.slap chips: [slup chips] French fries, usually soft, oily and vinegar-drenched, bought in a brown paper bag. Slap is Afrikaans for “limp”, which is how French fries are generally made here.smaak stukkend: Love to bits. In Afrikaans smaak means “like”, and stukkend means “broken”.smokes: Cigarettes.snoek: [like book] A popular and tasty fish, often eaten smoked. A snoek braai is a real South African treat.sosatie: [soh-saa-tee] A kebab, often lamb on a stick.spanspek: [spun-speck] Cantaloupe, an orange-fleshed melon. The word comes from the Afrikaans Spaanse spek, meaning “Spanish bacon”. The story goes that Juana Smith, the Spanish wife of 19th-century Cape governor Harry Smith, insisted on eating melon instead of bacon for breakfast, causing her bemused Afrikaans-speaking servants to coin the word.spaza: Informal township shop.spookgerook: [spoo-ahk-ghah-roo-ahk] Literally, in Afrikaans, “ghost-smoked”. Used jokingly, the word means “mad” or “paranoid”.stoep: [stup] Porch or verandah.stompie: A cigarette butt. From the Afrikaans stomp, meaning “stump”. The expression “picking up stompies” means intruding into a conversation at its tail end, with little information about its content.stroppy: Difficult, unco-operative, argumentative or stubborn.struesbob: [s-true-zz-bob] “As true as Bob”, as true as God, the gospel truth.Ttakkies: Running shoes or sneakers. “Fat takkies” are extra- wide tyres.tannie: [tunny] An Afrikaans word meaning “auntie”, but also used to refer to any older female of authority.taxi: Not a metered car with a single occupant, but a minibus used to transport a large number of people, and the most common way of getting around in South Africa.to die for: An expression popular in the affluent suburbs of Johannesburg and Cape Town, denoting enthusiastic approval for an object or person: “That necklace is to die for.”tom: Money.toppie: Old man.townships: Low-income dormitory suburbs outside cities and towns – effectively ghettos – to which black South Africans were confined during the apartheid era.Read more: Soweto, heartbeat of the nationtoyi-toyi: A knees-up protest dance.tsotsi: A gangster, hoodlum or thug – and the title of South Africa’s first Oscar-winning movie.tune grief: Cause trouble.Uubuntu: Southern African humanist philosophy that holds as its central tenet that a person is a person through others.Read more: An ubuntu Buddhist in IxopoVveld: [felt] Open grassland. From the Dutch for “field”.velskoen: [fell-skun] Simple, unworked leather shoes.vetkoek: [fet-cook] “Fat cake” in Afrikaans, vetkoek is a doughnut-sized bread roll made from deep-fried yeast dough. Mainly served with a savoury mince filling, it is artery-clogging and delicious.voetsek: [foot-sak] Go away, buzz off.voetstoots: [foot-stoots] “As is” or “with all its faults”. The term is used when advertising, for example, a car or house for sale. If the item is sold “voetstoots”, the buyer may not claim for any defects, hidden or otherwise, discovered after the sale. From the Dutch met de voet te stoten, meaning “to kick”.vrot: [frot] Rotten or smelly.vuvuzela: [voo-voo-zeh-lah] A large, colourful plastic trumpet with the sound of a foghorn, blown enthusiastically by virtually everyone in the crowd at soccer matches. According to some, the word comes from the isiZulu for “making noise”.Wwindgat: [vint-ghut] Show-off or blabbermouth. Taken from the Afrikaans, it literally means “wind hole”.witblitz: [vit-blitz] Potent home- made distilled alcohol, much like the American moonshine. The word means “white lightning” in Afrikaans. See mampoer.Yyebo: Yes. Used to show agreement or approval. From isiZulu.Brand South Africa reporter. Additional information sourced from Wiktionary, Wikipedia and the Rhodes University Dictionary Unit for SA English.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

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Ohio cancels live bird shows due to avian flu risk

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest In an aggressive move designed to help protect Ohio’s $2.3 billion poultry industry from the avian flu that has so negatively impacted other poultry-producing states, today the Ohio Department of Agriculture canceled all live bird exhibitions this year. The ban includes county and independent fairs, the Ohio State Fair, and all other gatherings of birds for show or for sale, including auctions and swap meets. Similar bans have been enacted in other poultry states. So far, Ohio is virus-free and the move is intended to continue that status.Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) — also called the avian flu — is an extremely contagious virus that primarily affects domestic poultry and is believed to be spread by wild, migrating birds. The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) first confirmed the virus in the U.S. beginning in late 2014. Since that time more than 44 million birds at more than 197 locations have been affected.“This was a difficult decision because it means young people can’t show their birds at fairs, but it’s in the best interest of an industry that literally thousands of Ohio families and businesses depend on and which provides billions of dollars to our state’s economy. The right move isn’t always the easy move, but this is the right move, especially when you see just how devastating the virus has been to other big poultry states like Iowa and Minnesota. Ohioans need to do all we can to ensure that we protect our industry and that we help avoid a costly spike in the price of important foods like chicken, turkey and eggs,” said David T. Daniels, Ohio Department of Agriculture Director.Ohio is the second largest egg producer in the country and home to 28 million laying chickens, 12 million broilers, 8.5 million pullets and 2 million turkeys. Ohio’s egg, chicken and turkey farms employ more than 14,600 jobs and contribute $2.3 billion to the state’s economy. Ohio’s role in national poultry production is even greater considering the loss that other major poultry states are experiencing.“One of the ways avian influenza spreads is by direct contact with contaminated materials coming from other infected birds. This means that exhibitions, auctions and swap meets where birds are co-mingling pose a high risk of unintentionally spreading this disease. Until we can be sure that there has been no transference from the wild bird population migrating through the state, we need to do all we can to minimize the exposure for our domestic birds,” said State Veterinarian Dr. Tony Forshey.Similar concern about the potential spread of disease that can happen when birds are brought together for shows and sales has caused Ohio’s neighboring states of Indiana, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and Michigan to make the decision to cancel shows for at least the 2015 fair season. Of those states, only Indiana has had a flock test positive for HPAI.The Ohio Department of Agriculture is working closely with the state’s poultry producers and the USDA APHIS to provide training and to closely monitor the health of poultry in the state. Detailed plans and protocols are in place to allow for a quick and coordinated response in the event HPAI is detected in Ohio. Human health and food safetyDespite the severity of the outbreak in birds, no human infections have been associated with HPAI and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention considers the risk to people from these viruses to be low. Federal and state law already ensures birds and poultry products that are affected by HPAI are prohibited from entering the food chain.Consumers should continue to employ standard food safety practices. Cooking poultry, including game birds, to the proper temperature and preventing cross contamination between raw and cooked food are always recommended to protect against viruses and bacteria. Recommendations for local fairsThe department is working with county and independent fair boards to identify options that will keep youth who are already raising poultry from losing their opportunity to have a fair project. The recommendations include amending the deadlines for students to switch projects and allowing the use of props or photos in place of live birds.“The experience of raising a live animal to show at the fair builds character and teaches responsibility. We don’t want to deprive anyone the opportunity to complete their projects. For that reason, we are working with Ohio State University Extension to send out guidance to the fair boards and 4-H committees urging them to be creative and find a solution that will allow their young people to still have a fair experience, even if they cannot bring their project to the fairgrounds,” said Director Daniels. Biosecurity recommendations for poultry ownersDr. Forshey is reminding all bird owners, whether commercial producers or backyard enthusiasts, to continue to practice good biosecurity, prevent contact between their birds and wild birds, keep birds inside as much as possible, and report sick birds or unusual bird deaths to their veterinarian immediately.Good biosecurity practices for poultry owners include the following:Monitor flocks for unusual signs of illness such as “snicking” (sneezing), a 1 percent or more decrease in egg production, or an increase in mortality. Other signs to look for are wheezing, lethargy, and depression.Practice personal biosecurity and avoid contact with sick/dead poultry or wildlife. If contact occurs, wash your hands with soap and water and change clothing before having any contact with healthy domestic poultry and birds.Keep unauthorized visitors from having contact with poultry, a good practice whether or not there is a disease threat. Authorized persons should be required to wear protective clothing and shoes before entering a commercial poultry house.Avoid contact between your birds and wild birds whenever possible due to the migratory nature of HPAI. These virus strains can travel in wild birds without them appearing sick.Clean and disinfect farm vehicles or equipment before moving them on and off your property.Sick birds or unusual bird deaths should also be immediately reported to the Ohio Department of Agriculture’s Division of Animal Health at 1-614-728-6220 or through USDA APHIS’s toll-free number at 1-866-536-7593. Additional information on biosecurity from USDA APHIS for backyard flocks can be found at http://healthybirds.aphis.usda.gov or by visiting www.ohioagriculture.gov.last_img read more

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