Alabama Shakes Honor Prince With Dedication At Nashville Performance

first_imgBeloved rock n’ soulers the Alabama Shakes performed at the Ascend Amphitheatre in Nashville, TN two nights ago, April 21st. Of course, the performance came just hours after the news of Prince’s death broke, closing an unforgettable chapter in music history. Just last year, the worlds of Prince and the Alabama Shakes collided, as Prince invited the Shakes to his Paisley Park mansion for a performance. He even sat in with them and played a roaring guitar solo on the bluesy song “Gimme All Your Love.”Naturally, when the Shakes set up to perform the blues number, they dimmed the lights to a haunting shade of purple, and allowed for Brittany Howard to speak about the lost legend. “We lost another great treasure today,” she said. “It was very unfortunate, and very sad news when we heard it. I’d like to dedicate this song right here to Prince, because this is a song that he played with us. I just want to let him know we love him, we miss him, and God bless him. May he rest in peace.”While the band didn’t join so many others in playing Prince’s music, they certainly felt the loss just as strongly as any other. Check out some fan-shot videos from the performance below:Don’t Wanna FightI Ain’t The Same[Via The Tennessean]last_img read more

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Analyzing rainfall

first_imgBy Sharon OmahenUniversity of GeorgiaJerry Walker thinks Georgia does a great job controllingemissions. And he should know. Twenty-five years ago he set up amonitoring site that analyzes chemicals in the state’s rainfallthat contribute to acidic rain.Now an emeritus professor with the University of Georgia, Walkerset up the first long-term wet-deposition monitoring site inGeorgia in 1978. The site was at a UGA College of Agriculturaland Environmental Sciences farm in Pike County.Now one of six in Georgia, the site is part of a 250-site networkrun by the National Atmospheric Deposition Program. Many sourcesfund the NADP, including state agricultural experiment stations,universities, industries and federal agencies.Analyzing the nation’s rainThe sites collect rain and snow samples across the nation.Scientists analyze them weekly for their chemical makeup. Thelower a substance’s pH, the more acidic it is.”By measuring and analyzing the rain, we can determine itslong-term effects on agricultural crops, forest and theenvironment,” Walker said. “The monitoring system allows us totrack the chemistry of storms and evaluate potential impacts ofnew sources of emissions.”John Melin, an engineering program specialist, has collected therain samples at the UGA site from the beginning. Every Tuesdaymorning, Melin and site operators across the nation collect,weigh and measure the pH of samples from their sites. Then theymail a subsample to the national office in Champaign, Ill., forfurther analysis.”Acid rain was a big concern in the 1970s,” Walker said. “But youhave to realize that normal rain has a pH level of 5.6, so it’salways a little on the acidic side. That’s because the carbondioxide in the air creates carbonic acid, which dissolves intothe rain.”Levels vary from state to statePure water has a pH of 7.0. In 2000, the most acidic rain in theUnited States had a pH of 4.3, according to the U.S.Environmental Protection Agency.In 2001, southwestern Ohio’s pH was 4.4. The Pike County, Ga., site’s pH was 4.8, Walker said. “It’s really hard to compare pHlevels, as they vary. It could be 4.3 in Pennsylvania and 5.5 inCalifornia.”Acid rain is worse in the Northeast and Midwest than in Georgia,he said.”That’s because of the emission of gases from the power plants… burning coal for fuel,” he said. “This creates a lot ofsulfur dioxide, which leads to sulfuric acid in the rain.”Scientists have confirmed that sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxidesare the main causes of acid rain. The EPA reports that two-thirdsof all sulfur dioxide and one-fourth of all nitrogen oxides inthe United States come from electric power generation.In Georgia, an estimated 26.7 percent of the sulfur emitted byutility units is returned through precipitation, Walker said.Plants benefit from the sulfur”Scientists have long recognized the importance of this elementto plant growth,” he said. “In some locations, sulfur is added todeficient soils.”Walker said he’s pleased with his 25 years of monitoringprecipitation in Georgia. “Our state panned out a lot better thanI thought it would in the beginning,” he said.”But that’s because we’ve made changes,” he said. “We’ve addedcontrols to our smoke stacks and decreased our auto emissions.Georgia’s a lot better off than some other states. So it’s notall doomsday like you often hear.”The goal of the national program is to pinpoint problems andrecord long-range trends.”The program’s data shows that, in general, things are better nowthan they were when the monitoring program was first started,”Walker said.To view the program’s findings, visit the NADP Web site(nadp.sws.uiuc.edu).last_img read more

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Mikel Arteta plans to build Arsenal midfield around Houssem Aouar

first_imgMikel Arteta plans to build Arsenal midfield around Houssem Aouar Houssem Aouar is Arsenal’s top target for the rest of the transfer window (AFP via Getty Images)Mikel Arteta is planning to build his Arsenal midfield around Houssem Aouar, according to reports.The 22-year-old has established himself as one of the best young midfield prospects in Europe following his performances for Lyon.Aouar has attracted interest from Juventus, Real Madrid and Manchester City.But according to ESPN, Arsenal have made Aouar their priority target for the remainder of the transfer window.ADVERTISEMENTThe report claims that Arteta views Aouar as a key part of the midfield trio he plans to use in a 4-3-3 system with Arsenal.Arsenal have already had an bid for Aouar rejected by Lyon as the Gunners offered cash plus Matteo Guendouzi. Advertisement Comment Arsenal have offered Matteo Guendouzi to Lyon but the French club refused (Getty Images)‘We spoke on the phone. Houssem Aouar is really appreciated by Arteta. There have been some discussions for Matteo Guendouzi who is also a good player. ‘He was mentioned during the discussion, but this is not the profile we need, we were very clear. If it is like that, it does not interest us at all… it is, and we stopped.’Arsenal are currently unable to match Lyon’s valuation, although their transfer will now be boosted following Emiliano Martinez’s £20m move to Aston Villa on Sunday.More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing ArsenalArteta, meanwhile, has said this week that he is keen to bolster his squad even further before the end of the transfer window.‘We are still active in the market, we are looking at different options,’ said the Arsenal manager.‘I would say we are active in the market for players in and out, at the moment the squad balance is not the ideal we want to achieve so there is still some work to do.‘Some positions are overbooked, I said some others, in terms of specific qualities that we need, they are still not there.‘We have to bear in mind the complication with this transfer market and the complexity and the timing, because you can see that clubs are behaving in many different ways and it is a little bit uncertain how this will work in the next few weeks.’Follow Metro Sport across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.For more stories like this, check our sport page.center_img Lyon are demanding €60m (£55.5m) for Houssem Aouar (Getty Images)Lyon, however, are not interested in a deal that includes Guendouzi and are demanding a €60 million (£55.5m) fee.AdvertisementAdvertisementSpeaking earlier this week, Lyon’s sporting director, Juninho, confirmed Arsenal’s first offer for Aouar had been turned down.‘I get along very well with their sporting director [Edu],’ Juninho said. Metro Sport ReporterSunday 13 Sep 2020 5:54 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link17.7kShares Advertisementlast_img read more

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Many have concerns following Trudeau’s oil tanker moratorium, including MP Bob Zimmer

first_imgWhile environmental groups continue to celebrate the widely anticipated death of the Northern Gateway Pipeline, many Western Canadian oil patch executives remain critical of the Trudeau government’s announcement last week to follow through on an election promise and ban crude oil tanker traffic on the BC North Coast.They argue the lack of export pipelines forces Canadian oil producers to accept a steep discount for oil they can only sell to American refineries, potentially making the US the big moratorium winner, if Northern Gateway does goes the way of the Edsel.However, while he’s also concerned Northern Gateway could be lost, Prince George-Peace River-Northern Rockies MP Bob Zimmer believes the negative impact could go beyond that, and depending on the moratorium scope he suspects the Americans could once again find themselves engaged in some rather interesting talks with a group of Trudeau Liberals:- Advertisement –last_img read more

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