Manchester United beat Ajax 2-0 to win Europa League

Share on: WhatsApp FT Man. Utd 2 Ajax 0: Silence, applause as Man Utd and Ajax honour Manchester victimsStockholm, Sweden | AFP |  Paul Pogba and Henrikh Mkhitaryan scored as Manchester United defeated Ajax 2-0 in Wednesday’s Europa League final in Stockholm, a match played out against the emotional backdrop of Monday’s terror attack in Manchester.France midfielder Pogba opening the scoring with a deflected 18th-minute strike before Mkhitaryan added a second just after half-time as United secured the only major trophy missing from their honours.With an average of 22 years and 282 days, the Ajax side selected by coach Peter Bosz was the youngest to ever start a major European final. Mourinho bet the house on Europa League glory Though he denied it, Manchester United manager Jose Mourinho gambled the club’s season on the outcome of Wednesday’s Europa League final against Ajax in Stockholm.Having missed out on Champions League qualification via the Premier League, he knew United must beat Ajax at the Friends Arena to secure a return to Europe’s elite competition. ***Players from Ajax and Manchester United observed a minute of reflection prior to Wednesday’s Europa League final in memory of the victims of Monday’s terror attack in Manchester.The two teams stood around the centre circle at Stockholm’s Friends Arena with their heads bowed during a brief period of silence, United’s players sporting black armbands, before fans of both sides burst into applause. Twenty-two people were killed and dozens injured after a suicide bomber targeted concert-goers leaving a performance by the American pop star Ariana Grande at Manchester Arena.“We tried our best to focus on the game. It is our job,” United manager Jose Mourinho told BT Sport before the match. “Not with the same happiness, the happiness that a great moment like this normally brings.” Ajax (4-3-3)Andre Onana; Joel Veltman, Davinson Sanchez, Matthijs De Ligt, Jairo Riedewald; Davy Klaassen (capt), Lasse Schone, Hakim Ziyech; Bertrand Traore, Kasper Dolberg, Amin YounesCoach: Peter Bosz (NED)Manchester United (4-3-3)Sergio Romero; Antonio Valencia (capt), Chris Smalling, Daley Blind, Matteo Darmian; Paul Pogba, Ander Herrera, Marouane Fellaini; Juan Mata, Marcus Rashford, Henrikh MkhitaryanCoach: Jose Mourinho (POR)Referee: Damir Skomina (SLO) Mourinho made his priorities clear in recent weeks by resting players for league fixtures, claiming United’s injury problems left him with no choice.“It was not a gamble. It was a simple decision,” said Mourinho, who picked a team with an average age of 22 years and 284 days for Sunday’s season-ending 2-0 home win over Crystal Palace.“When we lost players in a period of 17 matches in seven weeks, it was the impossible job. It was not a gamble, just a consequence of our situation.”Mourinho won the UEFA Cup, as the Europa League was previously known, with Porto in 2003, but the two-time Champions League winner was publicly dismissive of the competition – until this time.Starting line-ups: read more

Read more

Tulane player stable after surgery on spine

first_imgby Emily Wagster PettusTULSA, Okla. (AP)—Loved ones and teammates of a Tulane University football player who fractured his spine while making a tackle will face an agonizing wait to learn how serious the injury is and whether it will leave him paralyzed.Senior safety Devon Walker was in stable condition and recovering in an intensive-care unit after a three-hour surgery to stabilize his spine at St. Francis Hospital, said Dr. Greg Stewart, Tulane’s director of sports medicine. DEVON WALKER(AP Photo/Tulane University) “These kind of injuries take 24, 48, sometimes 72 hours to fully declare themselves,” Stewart said before the surgery. “We don’t know what the long-term implications and outcomes are going to be.”Stewart said he was with Walker on the field, in the ambulance and at the hospital after the injury Saturday. He said Walker was put into a cervical collar and couldn’t see much of what was happening, so Stewart explained what was going on. Walker was talking with doctors as he was being treated, Stewart said.Walker’s parents had traveled to Oklahoma to be with their son, and they were “doing as well as can be expected,” Stewart said.“They’re like the rest of us—hopeful and prayerful.”Stewart was back in New Orleans on Sunday, as were Walker’s teammates. He said Tulane’s athletic director and the football team’s trainer remained in Oklahoma with Walker.Walker’s injury occurred on the final play of the first half, hours after Tulane opened the Conference USA portion of its schedule against Tulsa. Tulsa was leading 35-3 and facing a fourth-and-2 with the ball at the 33-yard line on Saturday when the Golden Hurricane called timeout. Tulane then called timeout.When play resumed, Tulsa quarterback Cody Green tossed a short pass to Willie Carter, who caught it at about the 28, and turned upfield. He was tackled around the 17-yard line, with defensive tackle Julius Warmsley and Walker sandwiching him and apparently smashing their helmets together.Medical personnel from both teams tended to Walker as he lay on the field. FOX Sports reported a hush went over the crowd at H.A. Chapman Stadium as Walker was attended to, and that several coaches were in tears as he was taken away in an ambulance. Spectators bowed their heads as someone on the field led the stadium in prayer.Dr. Buddy Savoie said during a postgame news conference that Walker never completely lost consciousness and was breathing on his own.“He was stable when we transported him,” Savoie said. “I do not think, based on the information we have, his life was ever in danger.”Walker is a senior majoring in cell and molecular biology. His brother, Raynard, told The Associated Press on Saturday that their mother was watching the game on television when her son was injured.Tulane head coach Curtis Johnson said after the 45-10 loss that while Walker was on the field, Johnson told Walker that he was praying for him and that help was on the way.He said the mood among players was somber and called the day his most difficult ever.“It was tremendous that they finished the game, as I thought about just saying ‘Hey look, let’s not do anything else. Let’s just get on the road and go.’”last_img read more

Read more

Horse Racing Tips

first_imgHorse Racing TipsCAYMANAS TRACK LIMITED TIPSTERS’ COMPETITION Racedate : 23/12/2015LAGUNA POINT ABOGADO LAGUNA POINT LAGUNA POINTLORD EQUUS LORD EQUUS SIR RAJA BABA SIR RAJA BABABLUE DIXIE BLUE DIXIE BLUE DIXIE BUBBLING KITTENHE’S A DIAMOND HE’S A DIAMOND SMART TRAIN SMART TRAIN#COOL U BOOTS #SURE MAN DR DEAREST WHO’S BOSSYMESSITHEGREAT MESSITHEGREAT MESSITHEGREAT MESSITHEGREATCRUCIAL VALOR CRUCIAL VALOR CRUCIAL VALOR CRUCIAL VALOR#CHEERS GENUINE FRIEND #CHEERS PRINCESS SHEMIKAFIRE ALARM COMMANDING AVIATOR FIRE ALARM FIRE ALARMWAR CHIP #JAVINE #WAR CHIP #TERRA MARIQUELAGUNA POINT RED EAGLE ABOGADO ABOGADOLORD EQUUS LORD EQUUS LORD EQUUS LORD EQUUSBUBBLING KITTEN BUBBLING KITTEN BUBBLING KITTEN BUBBLING KITTENSMART TRAIN SMART TRAIN HE’S A DIAMOND HE’S A DIAMONDTRACKING DANIEL DR DEAREST GIRSHOM GIRSHOM#MESSITHEGREAT MESSITHEGREAT MESSITHEGREAT MESSITHEGREATRICHIE’S PIK #CRUCIAL VALOR CRUCIAL VALOR CRUCIAL VALORPRINCESS SHEMIKA PRINCESS SHEMIKA #ROVING STAR ROVING STARSWEET DIMENSION FIRE ALARM #FIRE ALARM FIRE ALARMWAR CHIP #WAR CHIP WAR CHIP WAR CHIPABOGADO #RED EAGLE FREE RANGE LAZZASIR RAJA BABA LORD EQUUS LORD EQUUS LORD EQUUSBUBBLING KITTEN BUBBLING KITTEN BUBBLING KITTEN BLUE DIXIESMART TRAIN #IDON’TKNOW SMART TRAIN SMART TRAINGIRSHOM COOL U BOOTS #TRACKING DANIEL #WHO’S BOSSY#MESSITHEGREAT MESSITHEGREAT MESSITHEGREAT MESSITHEGREAT#CRUCIAL VALOR CRUCIAL VALOR CRUCIAL VALOR LITTLE PRINCECHEERS CHEERS CHEERS CHEERSFIRE ALARM FIRE ALARM FIRE ALARM #COMMANDING AVIATORWAR CHIP FASTANDFLASHY #PROVIDER TERRA MARIQUELAGUNA POINT LAZZASIR RAJA BABA #SIR RAJA BABABLUE DIXIE BUBBLING KITTENSMART TRAIN HE’S A DIAMONDCOOL U BOOTS GIRSHOM#MESSITHEGREAT #MESSITHEGREATYOUR EXCELLENCE RICHIE’S PIKCHEERS CHEERS#FIRE ALARM FIRE ALARMCANTARE WAR CHIPlast_img read more

Read more

Crested Cranes eye semi finals spot in COSAFA

first_img Tags: 2018 COSAFA Women’s championshipcrested cranesfaridah bulegatop The Cranes have managed four points from a possible six so far (Photo by FUFA Media)COSAFA Women’s Championship 2018Uganda vs ZimbabweWolfson Stadium, Port ElizabethMonday, 17-09-18PORT ELIZABETH – The Uganda Crested Cranes will be out for all three points when they take on group L leaders Zimbabwe in the COSAFA Women’s championships on Monday afternoon.Faridah Buleg’s side goes into the fixture knowing that only a win will guarantee them a spot in the last four of the competition.The Cranes seat second in Group C with four points from two games and with Cameroon and Botswana who occupy second in the other groups having three points each, victory will see Uganda qualify for the semis either as group leaders or the best runner-up.However, it will not be an easy task against a side that has won both its opening two games of the competition in Zimbabwe.The South Africans defeated both Namibia and Swaziland and will head into the game against Uganda knowing a point will be enough to see them through.In the last game against Namibia, Cranes coach-Faridah Bulega made five changes to the side that had defeated Swaziland on opening day and it remains to be seen whether more adjustments will be made today.Uganda defeated Swaziland 4-3 in their first game before they were held 0-0 by Namibia on Saturday.The top team from each of the three groups moves on into the semi-finals while the best second-placed side amongst the three runners-ups also qualifies to the last four.The other group C game see Namibia who have one point take on Swaziland (0 points) at the same time at the Gelvandale Stadium.Comments last_img read more

Read more

Raiders’ Swearinger, Jordan active and will face Bengals

first_imgOAKLAND — New additions D.J. Swearinger and Dion Jordan will be put to work immediately as both men are among the 46 players who are active and can play Sunday against the Ciincinnati Bengals at the Coliseum.Swearinger, a safety, was signed after starter Karl Joseph was lost for the season with a foot injury as he went up to intercept a pass on the final play of a 26-24 win over the Los Angeles Chargers at the Coliseum. Jordan will bring depth and hopefully some more pressure from the edge. …last_img

Read more

Tracking elephants across Africa

first_imgThe satellite collars used to track theelephants are produced in South Africausing global positioning units outfitted withextra protection to survive the rigours ofelephant life.(Image: University of MassachusettsAmherst)Staff reporterAcross Africa, elephants are frequent visitors to farms and villages as they roam the landscape searching for food and water – often bringing them into conflict with humans. Now a team of researchers including Tanzanian Alfred Kikoti and Mike Chase of Botswana are tracking the animals’ movements through southern and eastern Africa using satellite collars in an effort to understand their ecology and help prevent these conflicts.The project is run by the department of natural resources conservation at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, where Kikoti is a doctoral student and Chase completed his doctorate in 2007.“Elephant populations have been increasing in Botswana and Tanzania since the late 1980s, when protection measures banned the international ivory trade,” says Curtice Griffin of UMass Amherst. “But human populations are also rising. Elephants graze in areas used by cattle and some raid farm fields, where they do a lot of damage in a short time. People have been killed when they try to chase elephants away or encounter them unexpectedly at night.”The research team recently founded Elephants Without Borders (EWB), a nonprofit group dedicated to understanding elephant ecology and behaviours and developing elephant conservation programs. EWB is launching a major fundraising campaign in 2008 to build the World Elephant Conservation Centre.Chase and Griffin have tagged nearly 50 elephants in northern Botswana and Namibia, a vast area of the Kalahari Desert. “Elephants aren’t staying in the parks,” says Griffin. “We have followed them from Botswana into Zimbabwe and Zambia, and they are moving across the Caprivi Strip of Namibia into Angola, where tens of thousands of elephants roamed before being decimated by 25 years of civil war.” As they recolonise southern Angola, the elephants move through mine fields without triggering the mines. Griffin suspects that their keen sense of smell helps them avoid the mines.Kikoti and Griffin have also fitted 20 elephants with satellite collars in northern Tanzania. “The problem of human-elephant conflict is worse in Tanzania,” says Griffin. “There are more people and farms. Elephants compete for water with Maasai cattle in the dry shrublands and raid large farms on the western slopes of Mount Kilimanjaro.The satellite collars used to track the elephants are produced in South Africa using global positioning units outfitted with extra protection to survive the rigours of elephant life. Periodic downloads of satellite GPS data via e-mail lets Griffin check on the herds from Massachusetts. Data are used to understand the seasonal movements of elephants and identify important corridors used as they make their way across the African landscape.Elephants for developmentChase and Griffin have documented some of the largest seasonal movements of elephants in Africa, and shown that the corridors used by elephants can be narrow and hemmed in by villages and roads, which elephants try to avoid. Communities and governments are encouraged to keep these ancient elephant paths open and establish wildlife conservation corridors free of huts and farms. This information is also important for community development.“Although having elephants near your village can be risky, they bring in tourists who bring in revenue,” says Griffin. “This is especially important in arid regions where there are few other sources of income. When communities realise they can earn money from tourists coming to see the elephants, they are much less likely to harm them when conflict occurs.”Attaching collars to elephants is a dangerous job. “We dart them with tranquilisers from a helicopter, and we usually dart the matriarch, the old female herd leader,” says Griffin. “If she is down, the rest of the herd stays away while we put on the collar. If we dart another herd member, the matriarch will sometimes circle back and try to kill us.” Elephants stay in breeding herds of about 18, so collaring one member lets the team monitor the entire herd.Collars are also attached to bull elephants. “When a bull is darted, the rest of the bulls could care less,” says Griffin. “In their search for mates, bulls have different movement patterns and indulge in risky behavior like traveling far from water. Bulls are fairly laid back compared to females with calves, but when they are in musth, a state of heightened breeding condition, they can be aggressive and dangerous.”Griffin regularly leads student trips from UMass Amherst to Africa, and will be returning in the summer of 2008 for an 18-day safari. This research has been supported by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and other donors. EWB works closely with governments and communities in Africa as well as private conservation organisations such as Conservation International, the African Wildlife Foundation and the Grumeti Fund.Related articlesElephant culling a ‘last resort’Useful linksElephants Without BordersUniversity of Massachusetts AmherstConservation InternationalAfrican Wildlife InternationalGrumeti Fundlast_img read more

Read more

Oh captain, my captain

first_imgHandsome Thamsanqa Matsane is theSouth African Navy’s newest commandingofficer. Commander Matsane is piped aboardthe SAS Queen Modjadji.(Images: Dean Wingrin) The SAS Charlotte Maxeke was Matsane’sprevious posting.(Image: South African Navy) MEDIA CONTACTS • Captain Jaco Theunissen  SAN public relations  +27 12 339 4349 RELATED ARTICLES • Maritime piracy under the spotlight • Two centuries of SA military history • SA to host military workshop • Voyage’s end for Agulhas • Rooivalk gets its wingsJanine ErasmusSouth Africa recently celebrated the appointment of its first black submarine commander, Handsome Thamsanqa Matsane, who took the helm of the SAS Queen Modjadji just before the end of April.The South African Navy (SAN) has just three submarines to its name, which makes the commander’s achievement all the more note-worthy. The ceremony took place at the Simon’s Town naval base on the Cape peninsula.Matsane (34) joined the SAN in 1998 and shone at the Saldanha Military Academy on the country’s west coast, graduating as the best mathematics student. With a BA in military science in hand, he served as a combat officer on the fleet support ship SAS Drakensberg and the Valour-class frigates SAS Isandlwana and SAS Spioenkop.Navy life above the waves was abandoned when he joined the submarine squadron in 2007 and rose rapidly through the ranks, overcoming the many challenges faced by submariners and taking up the position of executive officer aboard the submarine SAS Charlotte Maxeke.South African heroines, past and presentWith the SAS Queen Modjadji and the SAS Manthatisi, this vessel is the third of SAN’s Heroine class of submarines.All Type 209/1400 vessels, developed by German ship builders Howaldtswerke-Deutsche Werft, the three commemorate a trio of remarkable South African women.The SAS Queen Modjadji was named after South Africa’s rain queen, who lived in Limpopo province and was believed to have special powers including the ability to control the clouds and rainfall.The SAS Manthatisi is named after the female warrior chief of the Batlokwa tribe of the North West province, who reigned, according to documentation, in the 1820s. She reportedly led an army of more than 50 000 troops during territorial wars.Charlotte Maxeke, who gave her name to the third submarine, was a political activist and founding member of the African National Congress Women’s League.Matsane grew up in Bushbuckridge in Mpumalanga province – far from the sea – and named his grandmother, the venerable Betty Mashabane, as his personal heroine and inspiration.“Although she doesn’t have an education, she would always tell us that ‘education will help you get through’, even in the hard times,” said Matsane.He’s encouraging youngsters who aspire to a naval career to focus on maths and science at school, because many of the top jobs are technical in nature, especially on submarines.Matsane also wants more women to join the navy.“We have women still in training but in total there are only some 15 women in the submarine squadron. We need lots more South Africans, both men and women, to join up.”Not one to shy away from a challenge, Matsane completed the transatlantic Cape to Rio yacht race in 2003 after setting foot for the first time on a sailing ship just six weeks before.His performance was good enough to catch the eye of the Chilean navy, and he was invited to serve for four months aboard the controversial tall ship BE Esmeralda, a training vessel for junior officers, on her journey around the world.Ninety years of the South African NavyThe navy had another reason to celebrate in April, and that is because it turned 90 at the beginning of the month.The national military body was officially established on 1 April 1922 with three ships in its fleet – the Hunt-class hydrographic survey ship HMS Crozier and the two Mersey-class minesweeping trawlers HMS Eden and HMS Foyle were loaned to South Africa by the Royal Navy.The three vessels were returned to the Royal Navy in the 1930s and reverted to their original names, but were later renamed to HMSAS Protea, HMSAS Immortelle and HMSAS Sonneblom to commemorate their service in South African waters.Unofficially, the SAN began to take shape in the 19th century when the Port Elizabeth Naval Volunteer Brigade came into being in 1861, but it was only in 1885 that a more enduring volunteer unit, the Natal Naval Volunteers, was formed in Durban.The unit served in the South African War of 1899 to 1902, and in the Zulu Rebellion of 1906. It later became the reserve unit SAS Inkonkoni, which merged in 1913 with the Cape Naval Volunteers, known later as the SAS Unitie. The two units together formed the South African division of the Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve.In 1946 the fledgling navy, known as the South African Naval Forces, was absorbed into the Union Defence Force. The Union of South Africa was the forerunner to the present-day Republic of South Africa.In 1951 the South African Naval Forces officially became the South African Navy, which meant that ships were renamed from the title of HMSAS – His Majesty’s South African Ship – to simply SAS, or South African Ship.In April 1994, the year that democracy arrived in South Africa, the SAN and the other branches of the South African Defence Force – the army, the air force and the medical corps – became the South African National Defence Force.last_img read more

Read more

10 months agoCarroll admits West Ham let themselves down for Burnley defeat

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Carroll admits West Ham let themselves down for Burnley defeatby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveWest Ham striker Andy Carroll says they let themselves down for defeat at Burnley.The Hammers gave themselves a mountain to climb after falling 2-0 down to goals from Chris Wood and Dwight McNeil before the break – and it was a summit they couldn’t reach even after the introduction of Carroll and Grady Diangana at half-time.“It was very disappointing, a poor game for everyone,” he said. “We’re much better than that and I thought we could have done better from start to finish.“Second half we created a few more chances, but it was disappointing not to get many before then and obviously see them create so many.“Luckily we had Lukasz in net and he’s been great all season. He kept us in it.“I had a couple of chances, it was a great save from Tom Heaton. Cress put a good ball in and he saved it well. I was unlucky there, but overall it’s just a bad day.“We’re a good team and we’ve had a lot of players out injured. When they come back it will be a big boost, but we have a good team and we’ve just got to put this behind us and move on.” last_img read more

Read more

Northern Health expands eligibility of passengers riding Connections bus

first_img“This expansion provides access to services for some of the most vulnerable people in the communities of Northern BC, the elderly and those with mobility issues,” said Minister of Health Adrian Dix. “Including an expanded definition of companions helps support families when their loved ones are receiving care in other communities.” Northern Health says that while the expanded eligibility will help more northern residents, passengers who have scheduled medical appointments will take priority. Fares for travel are not changing, and passengers will no longer be required to book round-trip. PRINCE GEORGE, B.C. — Northern Health announced today that its Connections program is expanding passenger eligibility to include more people who might require assistance with healthcare-related travel in Northern B.C. Northern Health says its Connections service is now open to clients who meet any of three new eligibility criteria. Anyone with accessibility needs or mobility challenges, and anyone aged 60 or over will be able to ride the bus. Seniors were added to the list of allowed passengers after a report from the Office of the Seniors Advocate recently stated that access to transportation is an increasing barrier to the long term health of seniors. Northern Health is also expanding the definition of a companion rider to include passengers who have to travel to support immediate family members who are receiving health care treatment or services outside of their home community.last_img read more

Read more

Chevron seeks NEB licence that could nearly double production at Kitimat LNG

first_imgCALGARY, A.B. – Chevron Canada has applied to the National Energy Board to nearly double the potential size of the Kitimat LNG facility it hopes to build with Australian partner Woodside Energy.In a filing dated Monday and posted on the NEB website, the Canadian branch of California-based giant Chevron Corp. says it is applying for a 40-year licence to export up to 28.23 billion cubic metres of natural gas per year, with commissioning of the facility taking place by 2029.That’s the equivalent of about 18 million tonnes of liquefied natural gas and is nearly double the 10-million-tonne, 20-year licence it was previously granted, which is set to expire at the end of this year. In a statement, the company says the increase in scope comes after a review that focused on improving the project’s “cost of supply competitiveness” relative to other LNG projects around the world.The partners have not made a final investment decision, nor have they set a date to do so, but the expanded project is seen as another hopeful sign for B.C.’s nascent LNG industry after the LNG Canada consortium announced last fall it would proceed with its $40-billion, 14-million-tonne-per-year project, also to be built near Kitimat.The new plan for Kitimat LNG envisions initially building two six-million-tonne production “trains” with the option to add a third later, as opposed to the original two-train proposal.“Chevron’s application to the National Energy Board is a key regulatory undertaking and supports Chevron and Woodside’s desire to deliver a globally competitive Kitimat LNG project that is aligned with global LNG market demand, and which benefits British Columbians, First Nations and all Canadians,” Chevron said.last_img read more

Read more