Watch Nikki Glaspie Super Jam Tear Up The Gap Band’s “Humpin’” On Jam Cruise [Pro-Shot]

first_imgThe magical musical experience that is Jam Cruise will be setting sails next January, when Jam Cruise 16 takes over the Norwegian Jade from January 17th through 22nd. After it embarks from Miami, Florida, the cruise will round through Roatan, Honduras, and Grand Cayman during its weeklong circuit. One of the benefits of Jam Cruise and what makes it such a highly anticipated event each year is the intimacy provided by being trapped on a boat in the middle of the ocean with your favorite musicians—the event is chockful of awesome collaborations that are unlikely to go down elsewhere due to the fact that such huge name musicians rarely gather together will open schedules specifically for hanging out and making music.Watch Nikki Glaspie Crush Vocals On “Killing In The Name” With Galactic On Jam Cruise [Pro-Shot]One huge moment from this year’s Jam Cruise was The Nth Power’s Nikki Glaspie’s supergroup dubbed the Nikki Glaspie Super Jam. Today, Jam Cruise released new footage of the super jam getting down on The Gap Band’s “Humpin’.” This sweet collaboration went down on the last day of Jam Cruise on January 24th of this year on the Pool Deck. In the pro-shot video, you can see DJ Williams of Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe and Adam “Shmeeans” Smirnoff of Lettuce holding down guitar duties with Tony Hall on bass. Ivan Neville takes on the vocal duties for the number, with Joey Porter taking over toward the end of the video on talkbox. In addition to Neville and Porter, Nigel Hall also accompanies the duo on keys. You can check out the video for yourself below to get stoked for next year’s Jam Cruise, which is bound to have similarly all-star collaborations across its trip. You can check out this year’s massive Jam Cruise lineup here, and get more information about the event on its website here.last_img read more

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Senate Impeachment Trial Resumes LIVE

first_imgPresident Trump’s Senate impeachment trial resumes at 1 p.m. Eastern Time.House Democrats will continue to present their case that the president should be removed from office.The seven Democrats began their opening statements yesterday with detailed summaries of testimony by current and former administration and foreign service officials.last_img

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Mobile Credit Card Swiping Battle Continues: A Look at 4 Rival Technologies

first_imgYou can get an idea of PAYware’s fees, by checking out reseller’s pricing plans, like this one, which lists setup fees, monthly fees, per transactions fees, etc.  For a more personalized quote, PAYware says t can go here for more info.Typically though, a setup fee of $49 and monthly fees of $20 to $30 apply, as do per transaction fees, which are either taken as a straight amount or a percentage. The reader may be offered for free, depending on the contract length. It’s usually sold for $139. The mobile application used along with the hardware is free.PAYware accepts Visa, MasterCard, American Express and Discover credit and debit cards.ROAMpayROAMpay, another mobile credit card device and app combo, is available for a number of phones, including the iPhone 3G/3GS/4, iPad, several Android devices, BlackBerry phones, select Nokia phones and many others. The Swiper hardware is available for several Android and Apple devices and BlackBerry.Merchants can accept Visa, MasterCard and Discover credit and debit cards, and others. Tags:#e-commerce#Features#mobile#Real World#web Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces sarah perez The above prices are what’s available to low-volume customers – the same customers who may have been considering Square’s reader instead. For high-volumne customers, there are different rates – a $12.95/month service fee; 1.7% for card swiped; 2.7% for key entered and 3.7% for non-qualified transactions, like corporate cards; and a $0.30 per transaction fee.GoPayment also offers no long-term contracts, cancellation, gateway or set-up fees, it says. One account can enable up to 50 users and works on iPhone, iPad, Android, BlackBerry, plus some Palm and Nokia devices.Merchants can accept a number of credit cards with the service, but additional fees apply when accepting cards other than Visa, MasterCard and Discover (like American Express or Diner’s Club cards).There is more than one type of hardware attachment available for use with GoPayment. Intuit partnered with Mophie for its iPhone reader, for example, the makers of iPhone battery-charging solutions like the Juice Pack. There are also Bluetooth-enabled readers and reader/printer combos available.*One important note: GoPayment is only offering a free account and free reader to those who sign up by mid-February, after which prices may revert back, although Intuit isn’t confiriming. Square Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement Related Posts center_img Intuit’s top-competitor (that is, if you go by what tech journalists like to write about) is Square, the startup launched by Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey. Like GoPayment, Square includes both a mobile app and a credit card reading device – a small, square-shaped device whose shape gives the company its name.Like GoPayment’s (temporary) offer, the reader is free and there are no monthly service fees. The swiped transaction fee is 2.75%, a bit higher than Intuit’s 2.7% but its per transaction fees are the same ($0.15/each). For keyed in transactions, the rate is 3.5% + $0.15.Square says there are no gateway, monthly, early termination or hidden fees and you can accept an unlimited number of payments without restrictions on either transaction size or number of transactions. Square deposits your first $1,001 of sales per week into your bank account immediately. Any remaining amount is transferred after 30 days.As a Square user, you can accept any U.S.-issued credit, debit, pre-paid, or gift card with a Visa, MasterCard, American Express or Discover logo.Unlike GoPayments, Square is currently available for iPhone and Android only (select devices only) – not BlackBerry.It should be noted, too, that Square is currently in a patent battle over the origins of its reader and the related patents. The company had previously run into a number of other issues, including production delays to compatibility issues with the iPhone 4.Verifone PAYware MobileLike the above, Verifone’s PAYware Mobile solution is a combination mobile app and optional reader hardware.The service works on any iPhone (3G/3GS/4) device, iPad or iPod Touch, but only manual entry is supported on the iPhone 4, iPad and iPod. The company says it has plans to expand to BlackBerry, Windows Mobile and Android in the future.The PAYware card encryption sleeve works on iPhone 3G/3GS only. This is PAYware’s key selling point, as it touts the end-to-end encryption it offers, which meets the same security standards used by ATMs and Point-of-Sale terminals. Other vendors, it says, support SSL only, a software-based encryption method.PAYWare also says the fees and fee structures will vary and doesn’t list them on its site. Its rates will be based on risk criteria categorized into  “Qualified”, “Mid-Qualified” and “Non-Qualified” tiers, as is standard. Rates will also vary depending on the type of business and whether or not a transaction is swiped or keyed in, also typical. In addition, gateway fees for access to the PAYware Connect gateway are charged, too. What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Square, the mobile payments company launched in 2009 by Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey, is the name most often bandied about in tech circles these days when it comes to talk of credit-card swiping attachments made for iPhone. But Square was never alone on the mobile payments battlefront, and now it has a new competitor backed by a well-known brand name: Intuit.Today Intuit is making its two-year-old premium GoPayment service free – a service which comes with a magnetic stripe reader attachment that hooks onto the iPhone, similar to the one Square offers.Intuit GoPaymentIntuit’s GoPayment’s offering is a combination of a mobile application and, optionally, a magnetic stripe reader that attaches to the phone. Intuit no longer charges the $13/month fee or charges for the reader attachment (previously $219) – it’s all free now*. But to make that possible, GoPayment takes a higher cut of the transactions with its new discount rate fee of 2.7% (before it was 1.7%). For key-entered and non-qualified transactions, the rate is 3.7%. In addition, $0.15 is charged per transaction. These fees are competitive with Square. To use ROAMpay, customers must contact their merchant account provider to see if they carry ROAMpay. If so, they will help you get signed up, which includes locating the appropriate hardware and downloading the $2.99 app from iTunes, if applicable. ROAMpay says this fee applies for any other phone that supports mobile apps, including Google Android devices and phones that offer Verizon Wireless’s Get It Now service. With ROAMpay, your normal payment processing fees apply. You can also use ROAMpay on your PC or Mac.If you don’t have a merchant account, ROAMpay can connect you with its Payment Partners.ROAMpay also promotes its security features – all payment info is double-encrypted as entered on the device and is never fully decrypted until it enters the payment gateway for processing by one of ROAM’s payment platform partners. No sensitive data such as card numbers, magnetic stripe information or security codes are stored on the mobile device. The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technologylast_img read more

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Thanks Congress, But We Need Privacy Laws, Not Banal Social Sharing

first_imgTags:#digital media#Facebook#frictionless sharing#Netflix#privacy#publishing#video apps john paul titlow A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hostingcenter_img Great news! The U.S. Congress just sent a bill to President Obama’s desk that will make it easier to tell your Facebook friends what you’re watching on Netflix. Now when that kid you haven’t spoken to since 10th grade chemistry watches the new season of Arrested Development, you’ll be the first to know about it. Such is the result of the “frictionless sharing” revolution Facebook promised us.But there’s another aspect to this news. A provision in the new law that would have required the feds to get a warrant before snooping through your Gmail account was silently yanked at the last minute. Meet The Video Privacy Protection Act Amendments ActThe Video Privacy Protection Act Amendments Act reverses an anachronistic side effect of the original 1988 law, which prevented Netflix from launching the same type of “frictionless sharing” feature that Spotify and other digital media companies teamed up with Facebook to enable in 2011. It’s frustrating when laws written decades ago have unexpected effects on technology and services whose existence was inconceivable when the laws were drafted. In that sense, it’s a good thing that the law was updated to enable these new companies to do this new thing that is unrelated to what the original law was trying to regulate.But frictionless sharing is a meaningless sideshow compared to the much bigger issue of privacy – especially privacy for cloud-hosted documents and data. And Congress is getting the balance completely backwards.What’s With Gutting Those Privacy Protections?The word “privacy” shows up right in the name of the Video Privacy Protection Act Amendments Act. But by scrapping the warrant requirement in the new amendments, Congress has dealt a very unfortunate blow to digital privacy. The ease with which authorities can access information about citizens via mobile providers and Internet companies is outrageous. There’s a reason that a protection against “unreasonable searches and seizures” was baked into the founding document of our society. Back then, a search meant whatever somebody was carrying in their pockets, or whatever they kept inside their home or workplace. Today, to search my house, the government would need a warrant. But that’s not necessarily the case for my email and data hosted on cloud-hosted service. If anything, privacy protections for personal documents and data stored in the cloud should be even more stringent than what is required to search your home or person. But they’re not. Congress had a chance to fix that – but it punted. It’s great that tech companies can get their way in Washington. Quite often, that will lead to more innovation and a more level playing field. In many cases, the benefits will trickle down to consumers, whose interests are often parallel with those of tech companies. But that’s not always the case. And it’s not the case here. Frictionless Sharing Is Useless For ConsumersIn fact, even apart from the epic fail on the privacy issue, there’s little benefit for real people in The Video Privacy Protection Act Amendments Act. Frictionless sharing was supposed to become a major trend after Facebook rolled out a bunch of integrations with media content providers at its F8 developers conference in 2011. Thank goodness it didn’t.This type of sharing makes total sense for the companies involved. Facebook nabs an even meatier slice of our fractured attention spans and services like Spotify and Rdio see a spike in users as millions of new people are exposed to their branding and invited to consume their content via the biggest social network on the planet. Facebook users, on the other hand, were not enamored with the feature, which throws up a stream of everything they listen to and read, but only from sources that partner with Facebook. It presumes that my friends give a damn if I happen to be on a Radiohead binge, compared to sharing a single song and explaining why it’s meaningful to me. They don’t.The implementation of frictonlessly shared news is even more egregious. When I clicked on a headline that bubbled up via a publisher’s “social reader” Facebook app, instead of being taken to the article (the way links have worked since the Internet was invented), I was instead prompted to install the publisher’s Facebook app. Then Facebook redesigned the implementation and publishers saw their traffic land squarely in the toilet. On December 14, the Guardian discontinued its frictionless Facebook app. Good riddance. Pretty soon, this pointless functionality will work with Netflix too. Oh joy!And meanwhile, the government can continue to read through your Web-based email without a warrant. Original lead image by Kevin Dooley. Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Related Posts last_img read more

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