Future Faces – Henry Slade and Tom Brown

first_imgWould you like to sign up to Rugby World’s excellent weekly email newsletter? Click here. Find a newsagent that sells Rugby World in the UK. Or you may prefer the digital edition on your MAC, PC, or iPad. Henry Slade(Exeter Chiefs)Henry Slade – Exeter ChiefsFirst there was Olympic diver Tom Daley – now Plymouth College has produced another exceptional athlete in Exeter and England U18 fly-half Henry Slade. The 18-year-old is juggling his studies in biology, PE and graphic design with playing rugby for the Premiership outfit’s academy. And he’s firmly on England’s radar: having toured South Africa with the national U18 side in 2010, he was a pivotal figure in the party that swept all before them in Australia this August.Slade kicked 14 points in a 19-8 opening win against Australia Academy U19 and then, after stepping down for a 27-0 win over Australia A Schools, he scored a try and three conversions in a 46-19 rout of Australia Schools in Sydney. All of which delighted England Academy coach John Fletcher. “Henry was very good in Australia,” he says, “and the way he plays reminds me of a young Toby Flood or Rory Clegg.“Whereas before players had to leave the South-West to play Premiership rugby, there is now no need to do so, and the Chiefs have got a lot of good players in their academy. The future of Exeter rugby is good and Slade will push George Ford for the U20s fly-half position.”A great nephew of former Portsmouth footballer Geoff Williamson, Slade’s performances have earned him a call-up to this season’s England U20 Elite Player Squad, announced last month by head coach Rob Hunter.Rugby World Verdict: Slade could help the Chiefs stay in the top flight for years to come. Bea AspreyTom Brown – EdinburghTom Brown(Edinburgh)A good mentor is cricital to a youngster’s development, and 21-year-old Tom Brown struck gold with his. The full-back has been shadowing Scotland’s sole Test centurion, Chris Paterson, since joining the Edinburgh academy, and he made his debut for the senior side last September in the home victory over Leinster.However, as valuable as Paterson’s experience has been, he is a tough nut to crack, so his departure for the World Cup in New Zealand last month gave Brown the chance to show what he can do.  Brown is strong with the ball in hand andgood in contact, but his greatest asset is his pace. He’s a real threat in attack, and can be seen beating defenders all over the park. His skill-set has been noticed by the national selectors, and he has represented Scotland from U17 to U20 level, going to the Junior World Championships in Japan in 2009 and Argentina in 2010. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img For Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 Brown was unavailable for selection at the start of the season due to a dead leg, but Scotland’s National Academy coach Bryan Easson has no doubt that he will soon be a regular feature on Edinburgh’s starting team sheet.“Tom’s a very hard worker and he’s easy to coach,” says Easson. “He’s very popular in the squad  and very easy-going, and he’s easily made the transition to playing in the senior side. His kicking game needs work but he’s aware of this and he has the potential to be involved in the 2015 World Cup.”Rugby World Verdict: A great prospect – Paterson will be looking over his shoulder! Bea AspreyThis article appeared in the November 2011 issue of Rugby World Magazine.last_img read more

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Physical Waratahs storm past Rebels

first_img Tom Carter goes over the line for his second try against the RebelsMelbourne Rebels 19 – 35  WaratahsThree first half tries, including a pair for inside centre Tom Carter helped secure the Waratahs a well deserved away win in a physical 35-19 victory over the Melbourne Rebels at AAMI Park.Nine points from the boots of captain Daniel Halangahu and newcomer Bernard Foley, together with further tries for Sekope Kepu and Bernard Foley either side of the break put the visitors out of sight after just 44 minutes.  Although the Rebels notched up a further two penalties and a converted try, they could not contend with the visitors’ dominant all round performance, that earned the praise of Waratahs Head Coach Michael Foley after the match.“After the disappointment of last week and a six day turnaround, to have  come away with that result was really pleasing,” he said. “The Rebels defence was really good, at times they were able to lift us up and drive us backwards; they tested us at the breakdown but we still stuck at it.”Newcomer Bernard Foley wasted no time getting involved, putting in some early carries and earning good yards, with wings Adam Ashley-Cooper and Tom Kingston taking opportunities with ball in hand.With both sides putting in plenty of big hits, the Waratahs showed their composure, building the phases and testing the home defence with effective use of their ball carrying forwards and good support play. With the Rebel Army believing they had something to cheer, the home side appeared to be staging a fightback.   With the scoreboard at 35-19 in NSW’s favour with less than 10 minutes remaining, the last of the replacements took to the field as the clock counted down to full time, with breakaway Jono Jenkins making his NSW debut for Alcock in an earlier speight of substitutions. A final Halangahu three-pointer sealed the victory, although the Waratahs will be justifiably pleased with the end result and the 80 minute performance, a knee injury in the final quarter to replacement hooker Damien Fitzpatrick could prove to be significant, with the hooker set to undergo scans within the next 48 hours.HSBC Waratahs 35 (tries: Carter 2, Kepu, Foley cons: Halangahu 3, pens: Foley, Halangahu 2) dMelbourne Rebels 19 (tries: Penalty try , cons: O’Connor, pens: O’Connor 4) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS It took only 10 minutes before their pressure was rewarded, their opening try coming as a result of recycled possession, as they worked their way up the pitch.  Earning a ruck in front of the posts, scrum half Sarel Pretorius found inside centre Tom Carter, who sliced through the defence to dive under the posts.Carter added his second 15 minutes later, this time in the left hand corner, after a break from dynamic openside flanker Chris Alcock.  A second Halangahu conversion and a Bernard Foley penalty took the score to 17-6 on the half hour, before a converted try from prop Sekope Kepu, created by a darting break from fullback Foley, extended the visitors’ lead to 22-6 at the end of the first period.Foley further strengthened his case for the No. 15 jersey by scoring a well deserved try of his own on 44 minutes but the Rebels hit back with two more penalties before being awarded with a penalty try in the 65th minute, referee Bryce Lawrence penalising NSW for illegally halting a driving maul. MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA – MARCH 02: Tom Carter of the Waratahs scores his second try during the round two Super Rugby match between the Rebels and the Waratahs at AAMI Park on March 2, 2012 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Scott Barbour/Getty Images)last_img read more

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Rugby World Cup: Canada and USA fighting to qualify

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Scoring on US soil: John Moonlight scored in Las Vegas Sevens and will hope to do so again in the RWC qualifierBy Alan DymockTHE RUGBY World Cup may appear nicely teed up  in the minds of fans from the traditional rugby heartlands, with spectators already looking forward to South Africa playing Scotland, Argentina playing New Zealand and almost any game in the Pool A ‘group of writhing agony.’However, all is not yet decided. Every Pool for the World Cup still needs two qualifiers from around the world and this weekend sees the first leg of Americas 1 qualifier between rivals Canada and USA. The overall winner of the two games in the next fortnight will be the first qualifier for RWC2015 and will go into Pool D with France, Ireland and Italy.Any fierce clash between the neighbours draws a certain amount of attention, but with so much riding on the next fortnight it is likely that North America may splinter like your friends when the question of ‘whose round is it?’ crops up.Canada are currently at 15 in the IRB World Rankings, with USA in at 18. Games are traditionally close between the two teams – in May Canada won 16-9 on home soil and they also won in Canada 28-25, in June of last year – and neither side want to give too much away before this vitally important fortnight.Blast from the past: Chris Wyles in ’09, the year USA last wonHowever, Rugby World managed to gain an insight into Canada’s preparation for the first weekend of brutal action at the Blackbaud Stadium in Charleston, South Carolina, the venue where the Eagles last beat Canada in a competitive match in 2009. The pressure must be great, playing for such a prize. Do you get reminded of what is at stake, or is it an incentive-free atmosphere? “We get reminded. The management put up stats to remind us how close our last few games have been. We know this is not a cakewalk.”Certainly not, but regardless of the games that have gone before or the rankings or the odds, this two-week period will be as unpredictable as it is savage. There could well be less than a beer mat between them by the end of the contest, too. One of the Canadian props revealed: “We had a scrum session yesterday to get ready for the new scrum rules – the binding prior to engagement is getting mixed reviews from our props – and we also had a controlled scrummage last night against the Ontario Blues [a regional select side] to practice our strategy for the US, and practice new scrum laws.”Canada have recently run Japan close and beaten Tonga and Fiji, but lost heavily to Ireland in June. They are aware of how far they have to go to meet the standard of the top tier nations, but much like their sevens side who have become more prominent in the last two season, Canada are ambitious and set on becoming more competitive.Large, in charge: Canadian Cudmore will playOf course, the proof of how far they have come is by getting to the World Cup and playing well when there. So the first task, which is sometimes the hardest, is converting against your most familiar foe.“We have been reviewing film and focusing on the US strengths through daily meetings,” our international prop lets slip. “They are a strong opponent for us who we can’t take lightly, but other than that, there aren’t any secrets. We played them in May and have an idea of what they do: they have strong speed in defence and great lineouts. They run hard on offence, and have weapons outside.” DUBLIN, IRELAND – MAY 18: during the Heineken Cup final match between Clermont Auvergne and Toulon at Aviva Stadium on May 18, 2013 in Dublin, Ireland. (Photo by Stu Forster/Getty Images) last_img read more

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Poll: vote for your coach of the Rugby World Cup

first_img TAGS: Japan A shoulder to cry on: Daniel Hourcade embraces his fly-half, Nicolas Sanchez What about Daniel Hourcade? The passionate Pumas very nearly made it to their first final, playing an exciting brand of rugby. Perhaps you think their head coach is worth your vote. Or, if you feel that the greatest performance was not from a Tier One team, but by one of the unfancied sides, then look no further than Eddie Jones of Japan – what a tournament they had! Whichever way you vote, we will put the results in the next issue of Rugby World magazine. Keep your eyes peeled. Who was your coach of the Rugby World Cup? (Poll Closed) Eddie Jones  42.86%      Daniel Hourcade  25.83%      Michael Cheika  22.9%      Steve Hansen  8.41%      Create Your Own Poll   Who was your coach of the Rugby World Cup?For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS We’re nearing the finish line for this Rugby World Cup but it’s not quite done yet. We still have the small matter of the bronze final between South Africa and Argentina – despite Springboks coach Heyneke Meyer describing the game as “like kissing your sister” – and then the colossal clash between New Zealand and Australia in the World Cup final on Saturday.Whatever the outcome, this tournament has been fun, action-packed and full of heroes. And with that we don’t just mean the players who make the breaks, score the tries and slam into tackles. We also mean the head coaches who have masterminded some of the World Cup’s greatest performances and managed some of those stars who have burned so brightly.You have four options here. Michael Cheika, in the span of a year, has turned around the fortunes of the previously floundering Wallabies, and guided them to a World Cup final. Steve Hansen has taken the immense pressure of the leading the All Blacks in his stride and also pushed them to another final.last_img read more

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England name Eddie Jones as head coach

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS In the club game, Jones’s Brumbies side were the first Super Rugby side outside of New Zealand to lift the title, in 2001 and he had a short, largely unhappy stint at Saracens in 2008/09 as Director of Rugby, with Andy Farrell one of his players.Ten days ago he made a planned return to Super Rugby, taking the reins of the Stormers franchise in South Africa, before England came knocking. Got their man: New England head coach Eddie Jones Well-travelled: Eddie Jones took the Wallabies to the 2003 Rugby World Cup finalJones most recently coached Japan in the Rugby World Cup, shocking the world with an opening defeat of South Africa – a result many believe to be the sport’s greatest upset. Japan went on to become the first World Cup side ever to win three games and not progress from their pool.Jones will perhaps be best known to England fans as the man who led Australia to the World Cup final in 2003, losing to Clive Woodward’s England. He was also assistant to Jake White in 2007 when the Springboks lifted the Webb Ellis trophy. England have named 55-year-old Australian Eddie Jones as their head coach. He becomes the side’s first ever foreign coach.The well-travelled Jones has signed a four-year deal which begins in December. His first match in charge of what could a much-changed England line-up, will be against Scotland in the Six Nations, at Murrayfield on 6 February. He replaces Stuart Lancaster, who parted company with the RFU last week following England’s failure in their home World Cup.Talking on his appointment, Jones said: “I hope to build a new team that will reflect the talent that exists within the English game. I believe the future is bright for England. I’m now looking forward to working with the RFU and the players to move beyond the disappointment England suffered at the World Cup.”Players to coach: Jones believes “talent exists within the English game”Jones’s appointment comes after a short search. Earlier this month RFU chief executive Ian Ritchie had said: “The most important thing is to get the right person. It’s very important we get a head coach of proven International experience. Speed is important, but the right person is more important.” In signing up Jones by mid November he has secured a proven Test coach, quickly.Also making a statement today, Ritchie said: “Eddie is a world-class coach, with extensive experience at the highest level with Australia, South Africa and Japan. We believe that the appointment, which was unanimously approved by the RFU board, is the right one to bring England success in the short, medium and long term.” Eddie Jones has been installed as England’s head coach on a four-year deal and will lead them into the 2016 Six Nations TAGS: Highlight last_img read more

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Analysis: Glasgow Warriors out-think and overpower Leicester Tigers

first_imgAs for Glasgow, they head to Thomond Park where emotions will be raw. The best compliment they can pay fallen Foley is to play like this, with the same intelligent, honest industry that endeared the Munster icon to so many.Pictures courtesy of BT Sport Italian stallion: Leonard Sarto on the gallop for Glasgow Warriors …and hits Russell with a flat pass. Johnson is further out to the right, with props Fagerson and Reid primed to carry:In the event, Russell throws a mis-pass to Fagerson.Watch Brown and Hughes. They are already making their way towards the left-hand touchline in anticipation of a bounce-back pattern:Fagerson, who looks to be a hugely exciting prospect, is again strong in the collision. Johnson and Reid approach to resource the ruck as McCaffrey makes the tackle:And once the ball is recycled, Pyrgos can spin around to his left to see a promising picture. Once more, Leicester’s defence has ‘overchased’, committing too many men around the corner of the breakdown.Glasgow are in three waves, now. Strauss offers himself to Pyrgos on a short line. Further behind is Russell, who has Harley taking the same angle as Strauss. Beyond that, Hogg is circling around behind Harley with Brown and Hughes in the five-metre channel.To pick at the finest detail, Strauss’ line is arguably too acute, eating cutting across Pyrgos and meaning that Genge (marked by the lower yellow rectangle) can cover both men by standing still:When the pass goes past Strauss to Russell, Ben Youngs does extremely well to spoil what looks, even this far out, like a try-scoring chance. The England scrum-half bolts past Strauss on to Russell:Where a pass behind Harley to Hogg might present Glasgow with a three-on-one, Russell is forced to rush and can only throw a looping ball across to Hughes. Fitzgerald is able to leave Harley and drift across with Adam Thompstone:Hughes gathers on the bounce and crosses the 10-metre line. The ball is recycled and Pyrgos feeds the effervescent Gray……who steps off his right foot to head towards a gap and unbalance defenders Cole and Kitchener:This subtlety allows the hulking lock to cross the gainline. Reid, Harley and Fagerson recycle rapidly and Gray places back the ball to give Pyrgos a pristine platform.The scrum-half then notices Leicester’s fringe defenders creeping away from their positions:He throws a dummy and snipes to the verge of the 22:Because Pyrgos has run in a straight line, it is easy for the three forwards that resourced the previous breakdown to follow up and recycle again – known as ‘double-rucking’. When Pyrgos is scragged by the scrambling defence, Reid, Fagerson and Harley swoop.Once more, Glasgow recognise the value of quick ball and the necessity to step into the role of scrum-half. This time, wing Hughes is on hand……and pops from the floor to Gray:Pyrgos is back on his feet to manage the next phase and calls Harley around to the right. Notice Kitchener has identified himself as the guard:But Pyrgos initiates the same pattern that kick-started Glasgow’s first try. He arcs around Kitchener, sucking in bodyguard Dom Barrow, and looks to open up some space to the right of McCaffrey:McCaffrey responds, jamming in to close off the hole……but Harley still makes the 22, where Reid and Fagerson are waiting to hit the ruck. However, Hughes darts in as well……and is first to get over the ball:This time, both guards are set for Tigers. Still they are beaten by a run through the middle:And even if Hughes slips, Glasgow are in behind. Youngs looks to clasp on to the ball, but Fagerson catapults into him……putting him on the floor as Glasgow flood through. Brown is the next to play scrum-half, shipping on to Gray……who feeds Swinson. Note at this point that Hogg is screaming for the ball:Instead of forcing a pass, Swinson powers to within seven metres of the line. Watch Brown, the eventual try-scorer, size up the back-pedalling Leicester defenders:Hogg helps to clear the breakdown, emphasising the all-round awareness of this Glasgow team:And Pyrgos winds up to throw a pass back into midfield. Rather than hitting Fagerson though……he throws a longer, flatter ball to Brown, who has picked a hole between Kitchener and Tom Youngs:The collision is a big one……but Brown rolls off the floor before he is held……and regathers his feet as Raynal signals an advantage to Glasgow:Telusa Veainu and McCaffrey make a tackle before the try-line……but Brown is not to be denied:Glasgow snatched the lead and did not relinquish it, going further ahead before the break with a Pyrgos try before turning the screw in the second half. Aggressive line-speed and canny decision-making brought two interception scores for Bennett and Sarto.Clearly, Leicester’s defensive affairs are in disarray. Scott Hansen was sacked just over a week before this fixture, and that background story manifested itself in chaos. Welford Road has been a haven for Tigers this term and they have the talent to fix things. But with Dan Carter and Racing 92 in the East Midlands on Sunday, similar inaccuracies could produce an embarrassment. On-field action was comprehensively overshadowed by the gut-wrenching loss of Anthony Foley, but an entertaining opening round of European Champions Cup action still provided some thoroughly impressive performances.Glasgow Warriors’ efforts against Leicester Tigers started the weekend in stirring fashion. Their display in a 42-13 thrashing was superb. And fittingly, in a primal, partisan atmosphere, it felt reminiscent of Munster’s ethereal excellence of a decade ago.As with Foley’s famous team, ignited by the aggression of Paul O’Connell and co, Glasgow’s measured muscle up front proved irresistible. There were intricate attacking patterns and slick interplay, but, crucially, these facets came alongside an abrasive edge in the contact area. Scotstoun rocked as Gregor Townsend’s side imposed themselves on the occasion and dispatched Leicester.The match was encapsulated in the first two of the hosts’ five tries, both coming while flanker Ryan Wilson was in the sin bin. The Pro12 outfit did not panic. In fact, the yellow card may have even encouraged them to adopt a narrow, punchy tack. So often able to bully rivals, Tigers were tamed.Try one: Gatecrashing guardsWe begin this passage after a dominant tackle from Leicester has sapped Glasgow’s momentum close to the left-hand touchline. However, scrum-half Henry Pyrgos incites impetus once more.Hoisting the ball away from the breakdown, he curves back on himself as referee Mathieu Raynal polices the offside line:Pyrgos is quick enough to arc around Graham Kitchener in the Leicester guard position and looks to suck in bodyguard Dan Cole. With young tighthead prop Zander Fagerson arriving on the right shoulder of Pyrgos, the gap between Cole and Ellis Genge is under threat.The difficulty for Genge is that Glasgow have also deployed forward runners – locks Tim Swinson and Jonny Gray – outside Fagerson. Behind that, a second wave, organised by centre Sam Johnson, opens up the entire right-hand side of the pitch. Genge is in a dilemma. Should he jam in onto Fagerson or drift out onto Swinson?Genge steps out, offering Fagerson a gap as Cole steps in onto Pyrgos:A simple pass sets Fagerson away as Genge realises his error and jams on the brakes:Kitchener fights back from the guard position and Genge recovers……but Fagerson carries strongly……and makes significant ground. In behind the visitors, Glasgow opt to go wide and Pyrgos locates Johnson, who has moved up into the first-receiver role:Johnson throws a pass behind another wave of forward runners to Mark Bennett:The decoy angles of two back-rowers, Josh Strauss and Rob Harley, serve to slow the line-speed of Owen Williams and Mathew Tait in the Tigers midfield. Wing Tom Brady is around 25 metres infield from touchline:As the angle pans out, we can see that both Stuart Hogg and Leonard Sarto, the eventual scorer of this try, have held their width well – in the same manner as New Zealand have done during this season’s Rugby Championship.A gilt-edged chance is on the cards if the ball can be transferred into space. But Bennett drops the pass:Glasgow stay patient, though. They regroup and Pyrgos organises five phases of narrow forward carries as follows:A two-pass play back infield to the leftA one-pass play to the leftA pick-and-go to the leftA pick-and-go to the rightA one-pass play to the rightOnly at this point, inside the Leicester 22 once more, do Glasgow opt to spread the ball. Pyrgos finds Johnson, who has Hogg, Bennett and Sarto to his right. Again, there is around 20 metres outside of Brady, Leicester’s last man.Pay close attention to Finn Russell and Sarto, the two circled figures in the below screenshot. They are the central protagonists in the final phase of this try:Johnson cuts back against the grain, targeting a gap between Genge and Brendon O’Connor:The Tigers pair combine to make the tackle:Hogg hits the ruck to tacke away Genge. However, O’Connor bounces to his feet to contest alongside Lachlan McCaffrey.As Pyrgos arrives on the scene, O’Connor is grasping for the ball:Gordon Reid is next to reach the breakdown. Pyrgos looks up at referee Raynal, who informs him that O’Connor is competing legally:Pyrgos must wrestle O’Connor to the floor and Reid does the same to McCaffrey. On the right of the below screenshot, a pod of three forwards is preparing to initiate the next phase:Hogg circles back to hit the ruck a second time and Swinson assumes the role of scrum-half, stooping to find Gray, who has Fagerson on his right shoulder and Strauss on his left:Tom Youngs sprints out of the line in pursuit of Gray, but a slip to Strauss allows the number eight to make the most of the space outside of the tackler:Strauss holds firm amid the tackle of Mike Fitzgerald and Kitchener gets over the ball, but Fagerson follows up to resource the breakdown. He helps create quick, clean ball. Looking at the match clock in the top left corner……we can work out that the ruck lasts less than three seconds. Tigers are disorganised and under severe duress.Pyrgos takes the ball and crabs infield slightly. Meanwhile, Sarto bolts towards the left shoulder of Pyrgos. This holds Leicester’s fringe defence, creating a hole as McCaffrey drifts out towards Russell:A sharp pass from Pyrgos flies across the face of Sarto, bypassing Leicester guard Cole and bodyguard Fitzgerald. This isolates McCaffrey opposite Russell:Again, Glasgow have maintained the integrity of their attacking structure. They have two waves again, hooker Fraser Brown offering himself in a primary one with Bennett in behind him and Rory Hughes hugging the left touchline.This stretches Leicester collectively, and McCaffrey individually. He gets disconnected from Fitzgerald and Russell has a gap to dance into:McCaffrey and Fitzgerald do make the tackle, but not before Russell has crossed the gainline with Sarto in support:Brown smashes into Fitzgerald and Sarto is on to the ball before Pyrgos reaches the breakdown…From the reverse angle, we can follow Sarto’s opportunistic thought process.As McCaffrey and Fitzgerald halt Russell, three Tigers defenders – Cole, Ben Youngs and Tom Youngs from left to right as you see it below – curve around from the inside. Kitchener is worth highlighting too, because of his final position as the try is scored:Wary of Glasgow’s options to the left, Cole and the Youngs brothers all pass beyond the ruck without filling the left-hand guard role:Kitchener cannot get across in time and Sarto is simply able to stroll through a vacant fringe and over the line close to the posts:This is a fine example of how, even with 14 men, patience and precision from an attacking side can manipulate a defence. Just minutes later, Glasgow were in the ascendancy again.Try two: Bouncing aroundThe next sequence begins from a set-piece, Brown hitting Swinson at a shortened, four-man lineout. Pyrgos receives the ball off the top… TAGS: Glasgow WarriorsLeicester Tigers A fine win for Glasgow Warriors over their Premiership opponents was defined as they scored two tries while reduced to 14 men. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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Autumn Internationals Week Three: Five things we learnt

first_imgBut whilst Scotland’s core game was solid, it was the creativity that once again caught the eye. Not just creativity with the ball, but also at the set-piece. Their front-ball lineout, for Hamish Watson, was gorgeous and showed how a little bit of thought can catch even the best maul defences off guard.Smart move: Hamish Watson crosses from a lineout move against South Africa (Getty Images)In a modern game where five-metre catch-and-drives have become so hard to stop and therefore ubiquitous, ignoring all of the pods and throwing it short and low is a tactic that more should use.Add to that Huw Jones delivering pirouetting passes/breaking from underneath his own posts and Stuart Hogg carving up the wide channels and Scotland look every inch a top-five team. Next year’s Six Nations will be belting.Related: Watch Scotland’s incredible try against South AfricaExperimental England got what was to be expectedThe displeasure with England’s victory was clear. Clear in the pundits’ voices and the supporters’ chatter. Some feel that a 35-15 victory over Japan isn’t worthy of this England team. But there are two things to consider.Firstly, Japan aren’t really a Tier Two nation anymore, but they’re not Tier One either. They’re a Tier 1.5. This Japanese team scored five tries against the All Blacks a matter of weeks ago, although admittedly against the Kiwis’ second string, and 50-point margins against Japan don’t really happen anymore.What Japan lack in weight and height, they make up for with the precision and speed of passing that you would expect from a country with a Super Rugby franchise.The second thing that we need to remember is this was an experimental England team. New centre combinations, changes in the back three and a new back row don’t exactly make for a cohesive game plan, nor the associated high scoreline.Pass master: Owen Farrell gave England control when coming on (Getty Images)It wasn’t until Owen Farrell came on that England had any fluidity in midfield and why would they? George Ford, Alex Lozowski and Jack Nowell have never played together before – Nowell has never played Test rugby at centre.England selected an experimental team and got an experimental scoreline. It was to be expected.Stop kick-off times overlappingAs the on-field aspects of rugby march forward at a terrifyingly professional rate, on occasions the administrative side of the game still appears very amateur. Quite why the Scotland v South Africa and Ireland v New Zealand games overlapped is naive at best, stupid at worst.High rise: Scotland v South Africa lineout action (Getty Images)Rugby matches never run to time, it is the nature of the sport. With injuries and the increased use of the TMO, 80-minute rugby matches are anything but. So, to play the two biggest games of the weekend so close together makes no sense. Corner stop: Wales’ Liam Williams dives over to score against Tonga (Getty Images) It’s not just an issue about respecting supporters; it’s commercial suicide. The whole point of Channel 4 buying the Ireland rights was so that people watch their adverts. But with Scotland within six points of the Boks, no neutrals saw the first eight minutes of the Ireland game and probably missed the first two commercial breaks. Half an hour between high-profile matches should be the norm from now on.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. It was a momentous weekend of Test rugby – here are Paul Williams’s reflectionscenter_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Wales the most improved Tier One teamIt may seem paradoxical to big up Ireland, as I do below, and say that Wales are the most improved Tier One team in the world. However, Ireland have been playing at an extremely high level for two seasons; Wales’ improvement over the past 12 months has been rapid.Wales’ 74-24 victory over Tonga was their eighth on the bounce and barring a slow 20-minute period, they made light work of Tonga over 80 minutes. Wales have always had a reasonable first XV, but now they appear to have a genuine squad of 30, which is what all of the best nations have always had.Lock stock rising: Jake Ball impressed against Tonga (Getty Images)Wales have six legitimate front-row forwards, six locks, three scrum-halves, three Test standard outside-halves and a back three of six. Even the worries over depth in the centre would have been eased after Owen Watkin’s performance. He was remarkably strong in the tackle, but with a subtlety of hand that not only delivers perfect spiral passes off both sides but has taken pick-pocketing back to a standard not seen since the days of Fagin – his rip and strips against the Tongan’s were brilliant.Dan Biggar’s performance at ten means that Wales now have a situation where one of the genuine Test level outside-halves may not even be travelling on the bus. Add this to the performances of Jake Ball and a back-line that burned more people than an 16th century witch trial (31 in total) and you have a depth of squad that pro rugby in Wales has never had.Ireland dominate the All BlacksOne victory against the All Blacks could be misconstrued as a fluke, but two victories in two years is a pattern. And it’s a pattern that has made the World Cup a genuine contest.Ireland were awesome against the All Blacks. There is no other word for it. We could trawl through a list of statistics to illustrate their dominance, but to keep the ABs tryless is all you need to know – only the second time a northern hemisphere team has managed it since the game went pro.First 15: Rob Kearney celebrates beating New Zealand in Dublin (Getty Images)The Irish scrum was impeccable; at times they pushed the Kiwis around like they were a trolley in Lidl. Rob Kearney was immaculate under the high ball and defensively the Irish midfield was packed tighter than a six-month-old box of Sugar Puffs – Ryan Crotty was reduced to just five carries.Jacob Stockdale looked like a World Player of the Year in waiting and the Irish locks made Sam Whitelock and Brodie Retallick look like squad players. But it was, as always, Peter O’Mahony for whom the greatest praise must be showered.Every now and again you come across the alpha male of alpha males. The sort of bloke who’s so rugged that you’d let him build your new house, even if he’d never done it before. But O’Mahony goes a level beyond even this. I wouldn’t want my house built by him, I would want it built from him. He is wood and concrete made flesh and the best six playing the game.Well played Ireland, this wasn’t a game-changing performance, this was a sport-altering performance.Related: Peter O’Mahony the hero against All BlacksScotland playing well, but not winningTradition dictates that if a team loses, then all is lost. The team is doomed, the dressing room is septic and the coaches need to be beheaded in the city centre. But that isn’t always the case and it certainly isn’t the case with Scotland. They may have lost 26-20 to South Africa, but it was a good performance.There was near parity at the scrum, lineout, line breaks and defenders beaten, and let’s not forget that these numbers were achieved against a Springbok team who have already beaten the All Blacks this season.last_img read more

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Hotshot: Wales scrum-half Meg Davies

first_imgThis article originally appeared in the June 2021 edition of Rugby World magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Tell us about your move to Exeter… Last year I was at Gloucester-Hartpury and then Susie Appleby (Exeter coach) asked what my plans were. I wasn’t sure whether to carry on with Gloucester, go to college or go home to Cardiff and go to uni.I wanted to play rugby and do education as well, and she offered me an apprenticeship with the Chiefs doing a coaching course at college. It’s the best decision I’ve made.What was it like making your Test debut in the Six Nations? A huge surprise; it’s been a dream since I was young. I was really proud to be part of the team and there were emotions flying everywhere!What are your goals going forward? To continue playing for the Chiefs, and the same with Wales. I need to keep working hard to stay there.What do you do away from rugby? I’m outdoorsy and love kayaking, beach walks…RW Verdict: Davies is learning a lot from experienced Spain No 9 Patricia Garcia at Chiefs. She has put herself in the frame for the World Cup after receiving a late call-up to Wales’ Six Nations squad following Keira Bevan’s injury. The teenager made her international debut during the Women’s Six Nations Megan Davies prepares to feed a scrum during the Women’s Six Nations (Getty Images) center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Wales scrum-half Meg DaviesBorn 19 January 2002 Born Cardiff Position Scrum-half Club Exeter Chiefs Country WalesHow did you get involved in rugby? I started aged eight, at Rumney Juniors. A couple of boys in my class at primary school asked me to come down. When I couldn’t play with the boys any more, at 12, I went to Cardiff Quins. It was my first girls’ team.What did you like about rugby early on? The environment; it’s such a family environment. And you get smashed and tackled but keep coming back. There’s just something about it…I played basketball, hockey and athletics, but rugby stood out to me.What positions have you played? When I was eight, I was in the back row. Then the boys shot up and I was small, so I got chucked in at nine or ten and I’ve mostly played at nine since. I love getting stuck in; I couldn’t stand and wait for the ball,I want to have the ball in my hands. I enjoy scanning and looking for opportunities to snipe. I like to be involved.When did you first get recognised by Wales? At 16 I started to train with the sevens team and I went to Kuala Lumpur for the Touch World Cup in 2019. It was tough because it was really hot – after 20 seconds you couldn’t breathe – but it was amazing. After the World Cup, playing rugby was easy as I could run and run!Any childhood heroes? TJ Perenara and Aaron Smith. I like the way they play and their confidence. I’ve watched them play since I was young and constantly learn.last_img read more

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Burgess Carr, former All Africa Council leader, dies at 76

first_img Rector Martinsville, VA By ENS staff Posted May 14, 2012 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Ecumenical & Interreligious, May 19, 2012 at 10:39 pm Burgess Carr was such a blessing to St. Matthew’s, Snellville, when he chose our parish to be his church home during the last eight or ten years of his life. He was one of the most spiritual men I have ever known and also one of the most humble. Our entire parish loved him and his wife Francesca. Praise to God for his earthly life and his continued life now in heaven. Rector Bath, NC Rector Smithfield, NC People Featured Jobs & Calls Curate Diocese of Nebraska May 15, 2012 at 11:54 am What a fascinating man, “notorious” for his engagement in a call for a moratorium on Western missionaries to allow African churches to find their own way as the continent became independent of colonial control and the churches became independent of missionary society control. On the centenary of the Chicago-Lambeth Quadrilateral, I heard him say that true ecumenical unity was found not in formal structural unification of denominations but instead in praxis. He was always challenging and perceptive. May his soul rest in peace. Leon Spencer says: Katerina Whitley says: Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Washington, DC The Rev.Canon Gordon Okunsanya says: Rick Callaway says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Reverend Rick Britton says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Tampa, FL The Rev. Dr. Matilda E.G. Dunn says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Collierville, TN Ronke Rwagaju (nee Lardner) says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Events Christopher Szarke says: [Episcopal News Service] The Rev. Burgess Carr, a Liberian-born priest who in the late 1980s served as the Episcopal Church’s partnership officer for Africa and who for seven years in the 1970s headed the All Africa Council of Churches (AACC), died May 14 in his sleep, according to an announcement from St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church in Snellville, Georgia.  He was 76.“During his tenure as General Secretary of AACC, he brought a new energy to the work of the Anglican Church in Africa and made a few enemies, including Idi Amin. May his soul rest in peace,” said the Rev. Canon Petero Sabune, the church’s global partnerships officer for Africa, in an e-mail sent to church center staff May 14.In that same e-mail, Margaret Rose, the Episcopal Church’s deputy for ecumenical and interfaith collaboration, said: “Many here at the Church Center knew Burgess Carr when he was on staff here.  In addition to being one of my professors in Divinity School and the preacher at my ordination, he was an executive director of the All African Council of Churches, a great ecumenist and a negotiator of one of the first peace agreements in the Sudan.”Carr graduated in 1958 with a bachelor of science degree in agriculture from Cuttington College, in Suakoko, Bong County, Liberia, and earned a master of divinity degree from Harvard Divinity School in 1961. He was ordained a deacon in 1961 and a priest in 1962 in the Diocese of Liberia, which was a diocese in the Episcopal Church until 1980, when it became part of the Anglican Province of West Africa.Additionally, Carr served as the secretary for Africa with the World Council of Churches; Geneva, Switzerland, from 1967-1970. He was the executive director of Episcopal Migration Ministries from 1990-94; held various teaching appointments over the years at schools including Union Theological Seminary, Harvard Divinity School, Boston University, Episcopal Divinity School, and Berkeley Divinity School at Yale; and was a consultant to The World Bank, the United Nations Development Programme, and the Economic Commission for Africa. In 1972 he served as moderator on the Addis Ababa Agreement on Southern Sudan, which ended 17 years of civil war in Southern Sudan.Carr moved to Georgia sometime in the 2000s and served as vicar of St. Timothy’s Episcopal Church in Decatur, Georgia, for three years.  Carr and his wife, Francesca, had five children.The funeral will be at 10 a.m. Friday, June 1, at the Cathedral of St. Philip in Atlanta. Bishop of Atlanta J. Neil Alexander will preside. May 15, 2012 at 4:25 pm Burgess Carr was a man of deep spirituality that manifests in some in the African Christian experience. To be in his presence meant laughter, and then is his quiet way he would remind us of the roots of our faith: the journey through wilderness, the province of a loving God, the hope in our future healing. He was a gentle giant of our faith. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Burgess Carr, former All Africa Council leader, dies at 76 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Press Release Youth Minister Lorton, VA March 30, 2014 at 1:46 pm I met Burgess Carr when I was a student at Harvard. He taught a course on Two- thirds World Theologies. Informed, insightful and kind, he was a wonderful teacher and guide. He’s gone but not forgotten. Rector Pittsburgh, PA center_img January 15, 2013 at 9:36 am Rev. Burgess Carr was my boss at the All Africa Conference of Churches, at it was known then, and we knew him as the Reverend Canon Burgess Carr. A very hard working, dedicated and inspiring person with a great sense of humour and a kind heart. God bless his wife Frances and their children and God bless the Canon.Ronke Rwagaju (nee Lardner) Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Comments (11) Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT July 23, 2016 at 4:50 pm Amen! Amen! Submit a Job Listing Carolyn Coil says: An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI May 18, 2012 at 10:22 am The Rev. Canon Burgess Carr was a classmate at Cuttington University of my late brother Nehemiah C. Greene and my cousin, the late Archbishop of West Africa and Bishop of Liberia, Geaorge Browne. I grew up viewing Burgess as a brother figure in my life.Shortly following my marriage, he inquired whether it was alright to call me by my middle name, Eeleen which he knew from association with my brother and cousin. Following my ordination, be had a brotherly conversation during which he offered useful advice about the ordained ministry in the Episcopal Church. I thank God for his many and outstanding contributions to his family , friends, the Liberian Church, and the Episcopal Church at large in the United States, Africa, and the world. May his soul and the souls of all the faithful departed rest in perfect peace. Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Neville Callam says: May 15, 2012 at 2:46 pm It is a shock to hear of the death of a brother in Christ and a faithful priest of the Church. He was a true role model of what he preached and worked diligently for, peace and justice for all. He was bold , firm and outspoken on what he believed in. He respected all even those he disagreed with.He will be greatly missed.May his soul rest in perfect peace and light perpetual shine on him.Amen.Our heartfelt condolences go to Francesca and their children. You will all be in our prayers.Message sent from England. Rector Shreveport, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Tags Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector Columbus, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Press Release Service Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Music Morristown, NJ May 15, 2012 at 12:01 pm Burgess Carr was a man of God who served the church and the world. He was a role model for priests, a saint for peace and a native son of Liberia who brought pride to his country. All who knew him were treated with kindness and respect as he shared his faith and trust in God, his humanity, his intellect and his wisdom. I felt privileged to be in his company.Thank God for Canon Carr’s life and ministry. Obituary, Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Hopkinsville, KY May 15, 2012 at 8:03 am So sad to read that Burgess is no longer with us. An erudite and cosmopolitan man, Burgess was a fine facilitator and companion on our visit to South Africa with Presiding Bishop Browning in 1989. One of his sons was also with us. My condolence to the family. Karen Steanson says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL May 30, 2012 at 8:09 pm One of my life’s enduring blessings is having Burgess as my friend and priest in the early ’80s at St. Andrew’s Church during his time at Yale. I remember someone in a class asking him how to tell the difference between right and wrong. His answer: “I always ask myself,” he said, “does this build up community or does it tear it down?” No blather–just a practical and memorable guide. I rejoice in having known him, Francesca and the children. My prayers are with them, as I join you all in giving thanks for his life. Submit an Event Listing Comments are closed. Rector Knoxville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Albany, NYlast_img read more

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Malawi president delivers 100 bags of cement to Anglican church

first_img Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Smithfield, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Malawi President Arthur Peter Mutharika Photo: Malawi Statehouse[Anglican Communion News Service] The congregation at a church in Malawi had a surprise visitor bearing gifts May 29 when Malawi President Arthur Peter Mutharika arrived for the service bringing 1 million Kwacha (approx. $1,400) and 100 bags of cement.Bishop of Northern Malawi Fanuel Magangani was informed the president planned to visit St. Mark’s Anglican Church in Mzuzu as he was in the area. He said, “Most of the time when the head of state comes for worship you are likely to see some changes to the program, but it was different this time. Everything went on as we do when we have a joint Sunday service between our English and Chichewa service. We asked him to greet the congregation just like any other visiting member of the congregation and it was during this time that he announced the gift contributing to the construction of a new church building. He offered to the congregation MK 1,000,000 and 100 bags of cement.”This project at St. Mark’s began some five years ago and the congregation have been fund raising at the same time as continuing to construct the building which is now nearing completion.The bishop said, “This offering is coming at the right time and it will push them further to the finishing of the project. When it is completed we shall indeed worship the Lord in the beauty of Holiness.”Speaking to the congregation the president said that the church contributes significantly to the government’s development endeavors and therefore, it also needs to be supported in its projects.The bishop thanked the president for his visit to the church and the donation, saying it would boost the church’s construction work. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET By Rachel FarmerPosted Jun 2, 2016 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Hopkinsville, KY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Albany, NY Africa, Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Events Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Knoxville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Job Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ center_img Anglican Communion Rector Collierville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Press Release Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Malawi president delivers 100 bags of cement to Anglican church Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Belleville, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Pittsburgh, PA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Tags Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Jobs & Calls Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Washington, DClast_img read more

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