Website of the week: www.helpatwork.net

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Article This week’s website of the weekHelp at Work carries a technology warning – telling users to look elsewhereif you want ‘a leading edge technological experience, with loads of video,sound and flashy stuff’. Such no-nonsense sentiments will do much to endear thesite to Luddites and busy HR professionals alike who’d rather cut straight tothe info than wait for a big graphic to download. Help at Work, launched byColin Gauntrey, who has worked in training and development for all of hiscareer, is founded on the principles of experiential learning and situationalcoaching and aims to help individuals progress and develop in their workinglives. It also has a corporate offering, which takes the form of a bespoke sitebased on the Help at Work principles that aim to assist a company with the trainingand development of their staff. The backbone of the main site is a set ofguides, some of which are free and some accessible to members for an annual feeof £45, but there are plenty of opportunities to get a taste of the site beforeyou commit. All information is bite-sized, easy-to-access, and the tone islively and highly pro-active. Its three most popular information guides at themoment are: ‘I don’t enjoy what I’m doing’, ‘I can’t get people to co-operatewith me’, and ‘My boss is a bully’. Comments are closed. Website of the week: www.helpatwork.netOn 17 Sep 2002 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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NBA owes Moinian $7.5M in rent for Fifth Ave store

first_imgJoseph Moinian and the NBA Store at 545 Fifth Ave. (Google Maps, iStock)UPDATED, Jan. 15 2020, 4:15 p.m.: Talk about a foul: The NBA Store at 545 Fifth Avenue, which has remained closed throughout the pandemic, now owes $7 million to its landlord, the Moinian Group.The dispute is the basis of a lawsuit, first filed in New York State Supreme Court in June, by the landlord against NBA Media Ventures. At the time the suit was filed, the NBA owed the landlord nearly $1.9 million in back rent. But now, seven months later, that number has spiked to $7 million.While Moinian claims that the store has broken its lease by not paying rent, the store claims that the Covid-19 pandemic has made it impossible to operate.“Like other retail stores on Fifth Avenue in New York City, the NBA Store was required to close as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. Under those circumstances, we don’t believe these claims have any merit,” said NBA spokesman Mike Bass. “We have attempted, and will continue to attempt, to work directly with our landlord to resolve this matter in a manner that is fair to all parties.”But the store was struggling prior to the pandemic, incurring losses of $20 million since it opened in 2015. In an May email to Moinian that was submitted as part of the lawsuit, the league’s senior vice president of global partnerships, Hrishi Karthikeyan, said “our continued ability to operate the Store is only sustainable inasmuch as there is a discernible path to profitability.”“We did not open the Store to serve as a promotional vehicle for the NBA,” Karthikeyan wrote.The NBA signed a 20-year lease for the store in 2014. It takes up over 25,000 square feet within the building — which also counts Knotel and Best Buy as tenants — and has 76 feet of frontage along Fifth Avenue.“It’s unclear why the NBA has not opened their doors, even during the busier holiday season, while the neighboring retailers have been open since retail restrictions were lifted. The NBA is a multi-billion-company and yet they seem to think the law does not pertain to them,” said Edward E. Klein, managing partner of the Klein Law Group, which is representing the developer. “While we wait for the NBA to make good on their outstanding rent balance, we are hopeful that at the very least, the matter will be rectified through the court.”As of May, the store’s $625,000 monthly rent made up 20 percent of the location’s base rent, according to data from Kroll Bond Rating Agency. A notice to cure was delivered to NBA Media Ventures May 19.Under the terms of the lease, NBA Media Ventures owed $7,500,000 per year in rent, with that figure increasing to $8,437,500 starting next year. It will eventually reach a maximum of $10,678,710.96 per year until the lease expires.The Fifth Avenue retail corridor between 42nd and 49th streets has been suffering due to the pandemic: According to REBNY’s most recent retail report, the average asking rent fell 16 percent year-over-year, and in the period since the NBA signed its lease, rents have fallen 40 percent.UPDATE: This story was updated to add a statement from a lawyer for Moinian Group. Contact Sasha Jones Read moreNBA to open store in Joseph Moinian’s 545 Fifth AvenueInside the hardball legal tactics retail landlords are using against tenantsPop-ups offer potential lifeline to luxury streets Email Address* Full Name* Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlinkcenter_img Message* Share via Shortlink TagsFifth Avenue RetailReal Estate Lawsuitslast_img read more

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Oxford tops league table again

first_imgVice-Chancellor John Hood said: “Oxford’s top position is the result of the commitment and enthusiasm of our outstanding scholars and students, assisted by committed administrative and support staff.” Oxford University has come top of The Good University Guide’s national league table for the sixth time in seven years. More from The Independentcenter_img The University also came first in the subject tables for Geology, Middle Eastern and African Studies, Music and Politics.last_img

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House Speaker Bosma Announces Committee Chairmanships, Leadership Appointments

first_imgHouse Speaker Bosma Announces Committee Chairmanships, Leadership AppointmentsDECEMBER 3, 2018    By Eddie DrewsTheStatehouseFile.comINDIANAPOLIS—A lot of new faces will be chairing committees in the Indiana House of Representatives in the session that starts Jan. 3.Due to a large number of House Republicans who opted not to seek re-election this year, there are eight committee chairmanship and six leadership changes among the appointments announced Thursday by House Speaker Brian Bosma, R-Indianapolis.The new committee chairmanships include: Rep. Wendy McNamara, R-Evansville, Courts and Criminal Code; Rep. Tim Wesco, R-Osceola, Elections and Apportionment; Rep. Jerry Torr, R-Carmel, Judiciary; Rep. Holli Sullivan, R-Evansville, Roads and Transportation; Rep. Dan Leonard, R-Huntington, Rules and Legislative Procedure; Rep. Ed Soliday, R-Valparaiso, Utilities, Energy and Telecommunications; Rep. Ron Bacon, R-Chanler, Interstate and International Cooperation; and Rep. Sharon Negele, R-Attica, Ethics.One committee that will remain under the same leadership is the budget-drafting Ways and Means Committee. But Bosma appointed Rep. Todd Huston, R-Fishers, to be co-chairman as Rep. Tim Brown, the Crawfordsville Republican who has chaired the committee for several years, continues to recover from a severe September motorcycle accident.“I am grateful for the opportunity to take on this responsibility, and Speaker Bosma and Representative Brown’s trust in me to step into this role,” said Rep. Todd Huston, R-Fishers, in a statement. “As Tim’s recovery progresses every day, I look forward to working with him and the committee throughout the session as we tackle the state budget and other issues impacting Hoosiers.”Indiana Democratic Party Chairman John Zody expressed concern about one of the changes: Bosma’s appointment of Negele to head the ethics committee. Democrats have called for an ethics committee investigation into Bosma’s alleged sexual encounter with a Statehouse intern more than 20 years ago.“It’s like an alleged culprit picking their jury and judge,” said Zody. “If you think it looks like Speaker Bosma stacked the Ethics Committee with loyalists to bury an ethics complaint against him, you’re not wrong.”Negele was unable to be reached for comment, but as the beginning of the session approaches, Zody said Republicans are simply trying to run out the clock on the issue.FOOTNOTE: Eddie Drews is a reporter for TheStatehouseFile.com, a news website powered by Franklin College journalism students.Print Friendly, PDF & EmailFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Earth, Wind & Power, All Brothers Band, Organ Freeman, & Allen Toussaint Tribute Will Play Tonight In NOLA

first_imgDuring the daze between both weekends of New Orleans Jazz Fest, the celebratory energy remains, as many musicians stay down in the Big Easy to play shows and see the rest of their musical brethren. On Tuesday, May 2nd, The Nth Power will bring together a slew of special guests to re-create their Earth, Wind, & Fire tribute known as “Earth, Wind & Power.” They’ll be joined by the second-ever performance of the All Brothers Band, made up of the dual-brother attack of Oteil and Kofi Burbridge and Neal and Alan Evans, up-and-coming funk act Organ Freeman, as well as a tribute to Allen Toussaint by members of Turkuaz, Sister Sparrow & The Dirty Birds, Electric Beethoven, & Nigel Hall Band. Tickets are currently available here.Watch The Nth Power’s ‘Earth, Wind & Power’ Perform “Devotion” At Brooklyn Comes AliveWith The Nth Power putting together a stellar ensemble for this tribute to Earth Wind & Fire, it is without a doubt going to be an amazing performance. There will be plenty of that funk and soul to keep your body moving into the late-night hours with an incredible cast of musicians including Rashawn Ross (Dave Matthews Band), Skerik, Weedie Braimah, Lyle Divinsky (The Motet), Drew Sayers (The Motet), Erica Falls (Galactic), Paul Robinson, and Farnell Newton, as well as Kofi and Oteil Burbridge.Oteil Burbridge (Dead & Company, Allman Brothers), keyboardist and flautist Kofi Burbridge (Tedeschi Trucks Band, Derek Trucks Band), keyboardist Neal Evans (Lettuce, Soulive) and drummer Alan Evans (Soulive, Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe) are making their second-ever appearance as “The All Brothers Band,” with their first being at last year’s Brooklyn Comes Alive. The Brothers collaborated for an EP earlier this year, though they’ve yet to present this project for public ears. We can expect smooth layers of funk and jazz with these players, but there’s really no telling what they might have in store.Organ Freeman provides some serious toe-tapping jives, fueled by the trio of guitarists Erik Carlson, drummer Rob Humphreys and organist Trevor Steer, hard at work. Like many bands comprised of tight-laced musicianship, Organ Freeman emerged from an intensive music program called the Musicians Institute of Hollywood. Steer explains that the group “initially formed the group as more of an opportunity to experiment than a serious project while we were all students, and continued on as a creative outlet while we all played out as freelance musicians. It wasn’t until years later when we were presented with the chance to do a record that the band sort of morphed into what it is today.”The tribute to Allen Toussaint, known as the “Allen Toussaint Jukebox,” will feature a full set of music from his prodigious career. The band will consist of Shira Elias and Michelangelo Carubba from Turkuaz, Sasha Brown from Sister Sparrow & The Dirty Birds, Todd Stoops from Electric Beethoven, and Eric Vogel from the Nigel Hall Band, and it will take place in the cozy confines of The Den.Tickets for this special late-night performance are currently on sale here.– SHOW INFO –Artist:    Earth Wind & Power / All Brothers Band / Organ Freeman / Allen Toussaint JukeboxVenue:   Howlin’ Wolf – 907 S. Peters Street – New Orleans, LA 70130Date:      Tuesday – May 2nd, 2017Price:     $27.50adv / $35dosAges:      21+Tickets:  Purchase here If you’ll be down in New Orleans for Jazz Fest this year, don’t miss out on all of the awesome late night music options taking place across the city. Learn more about all of the amazing music you can catch at this link.last_img read more

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Radiohead & Hans Zimmer Release “Blue Planet II” Collaboration

first_imgRadiohead and legendary film composer Hans Zimmer have teamed up to score the soundtrack for the BBC’s natural history series Blue Planet II. The collaboration, which they call “(ocean) bloom,” is a reinvention of Radiohead’s 2011 King Of Limbs “Bloom.” Today, the track reveals itself in a five-minute prequel to the Blue Planet II series. The track, featuring new vocals by Thom Yorke, was inspired by the sounds of the sea, and recorded by the BBC Concert Orchestra. Radiohead’s original “‘Bloom’ was inspired by the original Blue Planet series so it’s great to be able to come full circle with the song and reimagine it for this incredible landmark’s sequel,” explains Yorke in a recent press release.“It sort of seeped into my subconscious. I found myself dreaming of these creatures quite a lot,” Yorke explained in a BBC interview. “When we came to do all those weird recordings for The King of Limbs, it must have been in there. It started with Colin [Greenwood’s] bassline and ‘Open your mouth wide.’”Zimmer, who composed the scores for The Lion King, Gladiator, Pirates of the Caribbean, The Dark Knight Trilogy, Inception, Interstellar, and so many more added, “In a funny way, I was trying to be respectful and not ruin the song, if you know what I mean. If somebody hands you somebody else’s work, there’s responsibility and respect that comes with it.”James Honeyborne, executive producer of the documentary, said the collaboration is “an incredibly powerful companion to the scenes we’ve spent [four] years capturing.” The new series will once-again feature Sir David Attenborough as the narrator, and will include footage of newly discovered and never-before filmed creatures, including a new species of crab with a hairy chest – “nicknamed the ‘Hoff crab’” after Baywatch star David Hasselhoff.You can listen to the full, uninterrupted track here at the 51:22 mark. You should also watch Hans Zimmer and Thom Yorke’s “(ocean) bloom” in the new prequel to Blue Planet II below:last_img read more

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Chris Kuroda & Phish’s Lighting Team Break Down Their 2017 Rig, YEM Vocal Jam Secrets [Podcast]

first_imgWith a landmark year of Phish now in the books, one of the most talked-about subjects in the Phish Universe has been the band’s new light rig. After using a setup with fixed spotlights and a mechanically-manipulated multi-part LED screen, Lighting Designer/Director Chris Kuroda and his team broke out an entirely different rig in 2017. They nixed the screens, and devised a new design that put smaller sections of the rig on individual sets of ropes with pulleys, allowing them to shift formations, create marionette-style dynamic paths, and more. The new lights have been a huge hit with fans, many of whom feel that this iteration of the rig is Phish’s best ever.In a newly-released interview with The Light Side podcast, hosted as always by experienced lighting designer and experienced audio engineer Luke Stratton (Dopapod, Thievery Corporation), Chris Kuroda and his team–including Associate Designer and Programmer Andrew Giffin, and Lighting Crew Chief Terry Smith–dig deep into the inner workings of Phish’s light rig. Recorded at Front-of-House and backstage inside Madison Square Garden during the band’s historic 13 night Baker’s Dozen residency, the new podcast interview delves into Gif and Terry’s “origin stories,” the inner workings of programming the lighting and automation systems for the light rig, and Kuroda’s secret tricks for lighting the “You Enjoy Myself” vocal jam, a particularly Phish-y segment where he is known to do some of his most mesmerizing work. The new segment is the second part of the two-part interview conducted this past summer (Listen to part 1 here).The Light Side is available at lukestrattondesigns.com/thelightside and on iTunes, Google Play, and Sound Cloud.You can listen to Part 2 of The Light Side’s two-part interview with Phish’s lighting crew below via The Light Side’s SoundCloud page:You can also revisit the first part of the interview here:[Cover Photo via The Light Side]last_img read more

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Getting a handle on inversion

first_imgIn recent years, a number of U.S.-based corporations with significant international holdings have shifted their headquarters overseas in an attempt to lower their tax bills. At 35 percent, the U.S. nominal corporate tax rate is highest among member nations in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The maneuver is known as tax inversion. Officials in the Obama administration have described it as unpatriotic, and are weighing an executive action aimed at limiting the economic benefit. Harvard Business School’s Mihir Desai is an expert on tax policy, international finance, and corporate finance. His work has explored the design of tax policy in a globalized setting, the links between corporate governance and taxation, and the internal capital markets of multinational firms. Desai, the Mizuho Financial Group Professor of Finance, is also a professor at Harvard Law School, and a research associate in the public economics and corporate finance program of the National Bureau of Economic Research.Desai spoke with the Gazette via email about the factors driving the practice of tax inversion, and also provided links to research around the topic.GAZETTE: What is a tax inversion?DESAI: “Simple” inversion involves taking a typical corporate structure and inverting it — a U.S. parent company and its subsidiary in a low-tax jurisdiction switch positions. Such a transaction largely leaves U.S. operations and foreign operations unchanged, but changes the nationality of the parent company. Such transactions can have two tax-related benefits. First, the U.S. employs a worldwide tax system on its citizens and corporations so that income earned globally is subject to tax, after credits for foreign taxes paid, in the U.S. As such, an inversion promises to remove future non-U.S. income from U.S. taxing jurisdiction so that foreign income only faces local taxes. Second, the new transaction may enable corporations to remove income from the U.S. more readily than they did before, via intracompany financings. In a study of the initial wave of these transactions co-authored with Jim Hines, we found that both motives were operative.The more recent spate of these inversions (PDF) is more complex and more substantive. After the enactment of anti-inversion legislation in 2004, corporations must find a foreign partner with an appropriate domicile and merge with them, in the process changing their domicile to the partner’s domicile, in order to access these benefits. Recent transactions have involved some of our largest companies, reflecting the growing incentives to undertake such transactions.GAZETTE: What is spurring the trend in inversions? The New York Times reported that 22 companies have announced an inversion since 2011, why?DESAI: The growing frequency and magnitude of these transactions are a manifestation of the changing incentives facing U.S. corporations. On two critical dimensions, the U.S. corporate tax regime is a significant outlier — we employ a worldwide regime and our statutory rate is amongst the highest in the OECD. In the last five years, our exceptionalism has become more pronounced as the U.K. and Japan switched away from a worldwide system. The U.K. cut their rate by 10 points and the third quiver of Abenomics [economic policies advocated by Japanese prime minister Shinzō Abe] features corporate rate reductions. In short, the rest of the world has moved significantly to lower their rates and moved away from the worldwide regime while we haven’t. Aside from these policy changes, there are secular changes in the nature of global firms which also drive these transactions. For example, non-U.S. markets are more important than ever and firms employ more intellectual property (which can easily be relocated) than before. Finally, corporations have figured out how (PDF) to splinter their headquarter functions across multiple jurisdictions, ensuring that they can have many homes.These transactions are just the most visible manifestation of these underlying changes. Our current corporate tax regime has led to distortions throughout the incorporation, investment, and financing decisions of corporations. First, U.S. corporations have enormous cash balances that are largely overseas (because taxes are only due upon repatriation), locking out funds that could be used for domestic investment. Second, U.S. corporations become targets of mergers that are motivated by relocation incentives, increasing the possibility that higher-wage headquarter jobs are relocated. Third, enormous resources are directed toward non-value-creating tax arbitrage activities. And entrepreneurs and venture capitalists can anticipate the burden of being a U.S. corporation and exercise their flexibility at inception to avoid these consequences.Most importantly, the incentive to invest in the U.S. is reduced. Given that rising wages for American workers is the clear economic priority today, reforming this system to encourage more domestic investment, which makes our workers more productive, is the most important policy priority. While it is tempting to characterize corporate tax reform as a sop to big business, we know that the burden of the corporate tax is borne by shareholders, workers, or customers. And much of the available evidence points to the majority of the burden being borne by workers, a result that is intuitive when one compares the relative mobility of capital, labor, and products. The excellent work done by my colleagues Michael Porter and Jan Rivkin on U.S. competitiveness also highlights how important tax reform is to advancing the desirability of the U.S. as a destination for investment.GAZETTE: How does what companies in developing nations pay in taxes actually compare to what companies pay in the United States? Is it accurate to say that the United States has the world’s highest corporate tax rate?DESAI: The current system is the worst of all worlds — we have a very high statutory rate (the rate faced by the last dollar of profit) by comparison to the OECD and an average rate (the rate reflecting taxes paid relative to income) that is within the norm of the OECD. The high statutory rate leads to perverse income relocation incentives and can distort investment decisions on the margin while we actually collect amounts that are significantly less than promised by those statutory rates. Similarly, we employ a worldwide regime that is byzantine in its complexity, but we actually raise little revenue from it. Other than allowing for dueling political rhetoric that is somewhat grounded in fact — e.g., “U.S. corporations face some of the highest (lowest) rates in the world” — this system has no winners.GAZETTE: President Obama has called companies that use inversion “unpatriotic.” Could you envision a type of backlash against these corporations by U.S. consumers?DESAI: While I share the frustration over these transactions, the use of the term “unpatriotic” always makes me cringe, given its historic use. Jawboning them into staying may well be effective in the short run, particularly for consumer-facing companies. But, it does little for improving the underlying situation more broadly.The political turn that is required is the one that occurred in the U.K., where the departure of several corporations led to significant reform founded on the idea that firms that succeed globally are a source of national economic well-being. Being home to such companies has important economic benefits and, moreover, penalizing their foreign operations is not consistent with the economic facts. In work co-authored with Fritz Foley and Jim Hines, we show that firms expanding abroad also expand domestically, undercutting the common intuition that global expansion by firms comes at the expense of domestic interests. While there will always be examples of harm done to domestic interests, it does not appear to be the case on average, and indeed, one can quickly intuit why working for a globally successful company (or university, for that matter) expands the opportunity set of workers and managers. Domestic headquarters, R&D activity, and export activity can all benefit from firms that are flourishing abroad. So the broader political issue (PDF) is to avoid a new form of protectionism and to embrace the idea that being home to globally successful organizations is a good thing.GAZETTE: Can you foresee reforms to address these issues? What kind of corporate tax reform would be desirable?DESAI: In the very short run, there will be a great temptation to pass legislation that targets these specific transactions by disallowing mergers unless the foreign partner is much larger and/or the resulting merged entity is managed abroad. As I indicated in recent testimony (PDF) to the Senate Finance Committee, such efforts give rise to unintended consequences. By “increasing the bar” on the transactions that will qualify as mergers, such laws — as with the anti-inversion legislation in 2004 — may simply lead to more substantive transactions with consequences that are adverse to American interests.  Additionally, my colleague Steve Shay has suggested there are regulatory actions that one could take without legislation that would help, particularly toward the threat of our tax base eroding.There is a fair amount of consensus about where we should end up, so I’m optimistic that we’re close to significant reform.  It is important to acknowledge that the better long-run solution is a movement to a consumption tax base with progressivity implemented in a variety of ways, à la the Graetz Plan (PDF). Given current political realities, my proposed changes stay within the frame of the current corporate tax and are revenue-neutral.First, switch to a simple territorial regime (where income only faces local taxes) from the current worldwide regime. As described above, the current system is generating little revenue and causing numerous distortions. Moreover, taxing only profits earned within one’s borders, rather than globally, has a sound theoretical justification. Worldwide regimes with credits for foreign taxes paid were historically motivated by the intuition that foreign direct investment involves one-for-one substitution between domestic and foreign destinations and that productivity differences across firms don’t exist. Under these conditions, a worldwide regime ensures that investment is only guided by pretax factors. In fact, several decades of scholarship on multinational firms has highlighted that heterogeneity in firm productivity is central and the research mentioned above suggests that foreign and domestic activity can be complementary. With these conditions, it becomes much more desirable that tax systems leave the identity of owners unchanged to ensure that the most productive firms flourish, a result ensured if local taxes are the only taxes faced by firms.  Efforts to incorporate alternative minimum taxes within territorial regimes should be avoided as they are effectively backdoors to a worldwide system.Second, drop the corporate rate to 16 to 18 percent to ensure that we are within the norm of OECD rates for the foreseeable future. Such a reduction will sharply limit unproductive profit relocation activity motivated by large statutory rate differences. Of course, these first two changes will cost us tax revenue. The corporate tax is not a great tax relative to other fiscal tools, but I still think it’s important to fund these changes within the context of business income. Two additional changes will accomplish that in a productive way.Third, corporations that pay the corporate tax (so-called C-Corps) now represent less than half of all business income, down from over 80 percent in the late 1980s. There has been tremendous growth in pass-through entities as legal and financial engineers have figured out ways a) to shoehorn partnerships into the requirements for publicly listed companies and b) to divide corporate income into operating income and property income to avail themselves of pass-through entities. As a result, corporate taxes are increasingly paid only by publicly listed multinational companies and there is a large untaxed business base. Charging a relative modest tax on these entities would level the playing field across organizational forms and raise considerable revenue.Fourth, aligning the way firms report profits to capital markets and tax authorities would both raise considerable revenue and restore credibility to the corporate tax system. We have a parallel universe for reporting profits to tax authorities which, unsurprisingly, means that it is not uncommon for some of our best-known firms to routinely report large profits to capital markets while reporting limited profitability to tax authorities. Ultimately, the economic position of shareholders and tax authorities are the same — they are claimants on pretax corporate profits. Ensuring a relatively common notion of profits that piggybacks on the considerable advances made by the accounting profession will raise revenue and make it less likely that corporations are seen to be paying limited taxes while reporting considerable profits to shareholders.As I said, I’m optimistic — these inversion transactions will hopefully highlight just how broken things are and that’s the first step in getting to a better system.last_img read more

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New Conference and Event Center at Champlain College

first_imgBURLINGTON, Vt.–Champlain College in Burlington has established a new Conference and Event Centera one-stop shop that coordinates a full range of services and amenities for conferences and group events. The new center puts a special emphasis on educational and corporate training events with coordinated use of the College’s high-tech facilities.An experienced professional planner coordinates events on campus at any time of year, including the summer months. Facilities serve 5-500 people, with convenient proximity to downtown Burlington.”The Champlain College campus provides a combination of amenities and setting that just can’t be found anywhere else at rates that are extremely competitive,” said Linda Wheeler, who has been named the director of the new center. The College has earned awards for its creative and successful blending of Victorian-era mansions and high-tech academic and residential buildings. The campus also offers million-dollar views of Lake Champlain and the Adirondack Mountains.Services include wireless meeting and conference rooms with electronic and interactive whiteboards and a variety of multimedia software and equipment. Campus lodging includes the Main Street Suites and Conference Center, with suites of four single bedrooms, a kitchen and bath, and a common living room. State-of-the-art academic facilities feature the latest technologies, while catering meets the highest culinary standards.Champlain Colleges Conference and Event Center can be reached at [email protected](link sends e-mail), www.champlain.edu/eventcenter/(link is external) or call (802) 651-5957 or toll-free at (866) 872-3603.last_img read more

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Laura Dagan named to Champlain College Board of Trustees

first_imgLaura P. Dagan, the president, CEO and chairman of Dwight Asset Management Company in Burlington, has been named to the Board of Trustees at Champlain College.Dagan, a resident of South Hero, Vt., is an active member of the Vermont Business Roundtable, Institutional Investors US Institute, Old Mutual Top Leadership Group, the Stable Value Investment Association and the international and Vermont CFA Institutes. Volunteer activities include serving as the treasurer of the Humane Society of Chittenden County.Dagan is a Chartered Financial Analyst. She graduated from the Advanced Management Program at Harvard Business School and she earned her bachelor’s degree at Bucknell University.She joins the board of a private, baccalaureate college that offers professionally focused programs balanced by a strong core curriculum. Founded in 1878, Champlain College is a leader in educating students to become skilled practitioners, effective professionals and global citizens.last_img read more

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