Algeria Distorts Inaccurately Translates Kerrys Speech on Presidential Election

first_imgFez- Two days after US Secretary of State, John Kerry‘s visit to Algeria, Washington issued a communiqué saying that Kerry’s statement at the opening of the US-Algeria Dialogue during his first visit to Algeria earlier this week was distorted. Following the speech delivered by John Kerry, Algeria’s official news agency released a report in which it stated that the United States “expresses its satisfaction with the electoral process in Algeria.”But the US State Department was quick in issuing a communiqué in which it denied that Kerry made such a statement, adding that his speech was distorted and inaccurately translated, which gives the impression that the United States endorse the electoral process and prejudges the transparency of the presidential elections. “There has been some erroneous reporting on Secretary Kerry’s remarks at the Opening Plenary Session. You have the full English transcript of what Secretary Kerry said. However, we would like to provide for you the State Department’s French translation of Secretary Kerry’s statement that is being incorrectly reported,” said the statement of US State Department,” said the communique.  The US State Department pointed out that Kerry’s original statement that has been inaccurately translated is: “Lastly, you have an election coming up here in Algeria two weeks from now. We look forward to elections that are transparent and in line with international standards, and the United States will work with the president that the people of Algeria choose in order to bring about the future that Algeria and its neighbors deserve.”© Morocco World News. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, rewritten or redistributedlast_img read more

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UN envoy on sexual violence welcomes African commitment to eradicating the vice

31 March 2011The United Nations envoy on sexual violence in conflict today underlined the role of the African leadership in combating sexual violence in the continent, and welcomed the commitment expressed by the African Union (AU) to ensure that the problem is eradicated. “The scourge of sexual violence traverses all of geography and history. But without the political leadership of Africa, we will not succeed in eradicating this international crime,” said Margot Wallström, the Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict.“It is essential that the commitment expressed by the AU Peace and Security Council also translates into concrete actions,” Ms. Wallström said in a statement two days after addressing a session of the AU Peace and Security Council dedicated to the issue of women and children affected by armed conflict.She also welcomed the AU’s decision to appoint a Special Representative on Women, Peace and Security and pledged her support for the envoy, who will serve as a point of contact to strengthen AU-UN partnership on the issue.“Some practical areas for such cooperation include ensuring that sexual violence is reflected consistently in curricula of the major peacekeeping training institutes in Africa, and in the training programmes of all African troop-contributing countries,” said Ms. Wallström.She lauded the decision to deploy advisers to AU peacekeeping and political missions to ensure that women, peace and security concerns are consistently reflected in monitoring and reporting, mediation efforts, and in peace processes and agreements, and commended the AU’s support for the appointment of more women as Special Representatives and its support for women’s involvement in peace processes.“In order to ensure concerted action, I strongly encourage the UN Security Council and the AU Peace and Security Council to include conflict-related sexual violence as an item on the agenda of their annual meeting,” Ms. Wallström added. read more

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Worlds postal workers can help bridge digital divide says UN agency chief

“Today, the post office is so much more than the place you go to send or receive a letter or parcel; it is also a hub for electronic and financial services,” Universal Postal Union (UPU) Director General Edouard Dayan stressed in a message for World Post Day, celebrated annually on 9 October, the day the UPU was founded in 1874.Thus the postal sector plays an important role in achieving the goals of the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS) to be held in Tunisia next month.“The Post is present everywhere, even in the remotest corners of many countries, and serves as a key point of access to the outside world. Its doors are open to all, without discrimination, making it a fundamentally universal phenomenon, a force for integration,” Mr. Dayan said, stressing the important role the postal sector plays in the new information society.The world postal network is pushing back the physical, digital and financial frontiers through the effective use of new technologies, thus helping to build national economies and reducing poverty around the world, he added.Mr. Dayan, a veteran French postal official, took over the leadership of the Berne-based 190-member UPU in January, declaring his vision of an efficient, innovative, united and open organization, ready to use the tools of the new age.Each year, 5 million employees process and deliver 424 billion domestic letter-post items, some 6 billion international items and more than 4.4 billion ordinary parcels. read more

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Visiting scholars settle in at Brock

Lucia Porcu or Tolga Torun chat at the We Welcome the World reception.Neither Lucia Porcu or Tolga Torun had been to Canada before when their planes touched down a month ago. Now, they navigate Brock University like pros.The visiting PhD candidates – Torun from Bilecik University in Turkey, Porcu from Granada University in Spain – said when they first got to Brock, the campus seemed “complicated” to get around.“The first day, it seemed so big,” Porcu said.Now they are among 17 visiting scholars who have become part of the fabric of the university, all honoured at Brock International’s We Welcome the World reception at Pond Inlet on Oct. 25.Porcu and Torun study marketing communications. Porcu is researching integrated marketing communications, while Torun researches the impact of marketing communications in virtual communities like Facebook and MySpace. Both came to Brock to work with Philip Kitchen, new Dean of Business and recognized expert in the field.“He’s a very good professor. He’s had a very important impact,” said Torun, who describes Kitchen as “a guru” in marketing communications.Torun, who will be at Brock until February 2011, calls Canada a “nice place to live.” Porcu, at Brock until December, describes it as quiet compared to bustling southern Europe.Their visit has been more than just academia. They’ve already toured Niagara Falls and Niagara-on-the-Lake. Travel plans before they head home include Toronto, Montreal and New York City.Brock’s current visiting scholars include professor and graduate students from as far as Pakistan, Egypt, China, Iran and Columbia. Among them are:Jurgen Kramer, a professor from the University of Dortmund in Germany teaching courses in Joseph Conrad and Later Victorian LiteratureSalwa Helmy Aly Youssef, a PhD candidate from Beni Suef University in Egypt who is researching human rights educationRui Li, a PhD candidate from Central University of Finance and Economics in China who is researching earnings consistency and riskiness related to executive compensationYutae Seo, a graduate student from Myungji University in Korea, who is working with Mathematics professor Thomas Wolf to research the game GoRussell Lawson, a professor from Bacone College in the U.S., is a Fulbright Visiting Research Chair in Transnational Studies. He will give his inaugural lecture, “The Messengers,” at 4 p.m. on Oct. 29 in Pond Inlet.Get The Brock News delivered to your email. read more

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RBC Capital Markets says Glencore International fast track into the FTSE 100″

first_imgRBC Capital Markets forecasts a near doubling (+98%) of Industrial Activities EBITDA over the coming three years, one of the strongest near-term growth profiles amongst the diversified miners. Glencore’s Industrial asset base is diverse, but EBITDA generation is focused on just five key assets. Kazzinc, Prodeco, Katanga, Mopani, and the Xstrata stake account for 90% of this EBITDA growth contribution through 2013E. “Aside from the five key Industrial assets, the Marketing business is the other key contributor to Glencore, accounting for 38% of group EBITDA last year. Despite forecasting Marketing EBITDA growth of 31% year over year in 2011, our future EBITDA forecasts still do not surpass that generated in 2008 ($3.2 billion). With low visibility in the marketing model we remain conservative on our forecasts, despite Glencore having indicated a strong start to 2011E in trading.“Kazzinc optionality could provide further funding in 2012E We think one of the more interesting near-term aspects of the Glencore story lies with the transformation in the Kazzinc (KZ) stake. $2.2 billion of IPO proceeds are to be allocated to a 42.3% stake purchase, bringing Glencore’s stake in KZ to 93% by year-end 2011E. Glencore may also consider a spin-off of KZ’s Altyntau gold assets as early as 2012E. This fundraising could not only prove significantly value-accretive for Glencore, but it could also raise funds for further industry consolidation.“We have valued Glencore at £6 per share, with a Sector Perform, Average Risk rating. With the inclusion of Glencore in the FTSE 100 (as of the close on May 24), we expect index buying to continue in coming months. We think the stock could trade as high as £6.10 during this period; however, for the stock to trade significantly (+10%) above its current price we think the sector will also need to rerate. Glencore is likely to remain one of the more topical mining investments over the coming 18 months.last_img read more

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ERI wins two desalination contracts for major mining plants in Chile

first_imgPX Pressure Exchangerä (PXä) devices from Energy Recovery Inc (ERI), a global leader in the design and development of energy recovery devices and pumps for desalination and other industrial processes, have been selected for two separate large-scale desalination projects in Chile. The Copiapó Valley project, located in northern Chile, will be built by ACCIONA Agua and is owned by Grupo CAP. The second project, awarded by an undisclosed firm, will also use ERI’s industry-leading PX devices to maximise availability and decrease costs. Both projects are expected to be built in 2012.The desalination projects are designed to secure an adequate supply of water for mining operations. Acciona’s selection of ERI’s PX devices ensures the highest energy efficiency and operational availability while producing water of the best quality, all of which are critical, as projects are subject to strict environmental, financial, and quality standards.The Copiapó plant, producing 17,000 m3/d of water, is expected to be increased to 52,000 m3/d. “Providing critical fresh water supplies to Grupo CAP for mining operations in this region is a task that requires the most reliable and efficient technology possible, which is why ACCIONA selected ERI’s energy recovery devices,” said Julio Zorrilla, ACCIONA Agua International Construction Director. “In selecting ERI, we trust that the PX technology will eliminate costly, unscheduled shut-downs while ensuring that our costs remain low.”“We are pleased that, to date, ERI has been selected for the vast majority of desalination projects in Chile for mining applications. Our unique PX technology is a perfect fit for this application,” said Tom Rooney, CEO of ERI. “With an uptime of 99.8% and a design life of 25 years, our PX devices will ensure fresh water supplies for the mining operations for decades to come.”last_img read more

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Boring couple win 1 compensation for Street View trespassing

first_imgWhile most people see Street View data collection as a good thing allowing us all to better navigate the world, there are a growing number of people who are turned off by it and see it as an invasion of privacy. In some cases that privacy invasion may be warranted, especially if Street Views vehicles start driving down private roads.Aaron and Christine Boring decided to take action against Google for just such an offence. In 2008 a Street View car drove up their private road and captured images of their property. The couple saw this as an invasion of privacy and stated it incurred a devaluation of their home.The case has been ongoing with most of the charges being thrown out of court due to the information Google captured already being publicly available elsewhere. But the Boring couple persevered and have finally got a ruling in their favor. Google is guilty of a Count II Trespass and the judge has awarded them $1 in compensation.Google’s comment on the ruling is as follows:We are pleased that this lawsuit has finally ended with plaintiffs’ acknowledgment that they are entitled to only $1. We’re not sure how Aaron and Christine feel about this, hopefully they are focusing on the fact they at least won on one count.Read more at TechCrunchMatthew’s OpinionI can’t help but wonder what would happen if someone drove a car on to one of Google’s properties and started taking photos. Would they sue the individual?If the information collected by the Street View car hadn’t been available elsewhere then this could have gone a completely different way. Google may have been facing up to most of the charges brought, and having to pay much more than a dollar compensation.While Google has every right to travel through public areas taking photos, it should respect private land. When we originally reported on this in 2008 Google stated they do not drive on to private land, but that statement was retracted when someone asked an actual Street View driver and they said they were just told to drive and take pictures. Hopefully more clear guidance is given now.last_img read more

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Rapid Revolution the Irishman making waves in the American sports landscape

first_img By Eoin O’Callaghan Share55 Tweet Email Sunday 5 Mar 2017, 10:44 PM “I’m a big Drogheda United supporter and still follow the league. It’s challenging. It takes a lot of time and a real long-term vision to build what they’ve built here. It takes a group of people who are willing to take losses in the beginning because they’re trying to grow the overall capital value of their teams. They’re not looking for immediate success that’s then going to flame out. They understand how to build these things long-term. But there are huge benefits from a commercial perspective. In the city of Denver, there are more than enough businesses that are willing to come in as partners of the clubs that enable us to become part of the community and generate the finances that’s required to run a professional club in the right way.There’s a much more holistic approach over here. We employ more people selling tickets than we do in any other side of the business. We have partnership marketing groups. They’re not out there looking for someone to just give them money – they’re looking to create long-term strategic partnerships. That doesn’t happen back home. I think it’s still about surviving. Now, there are a number of tremendous people working very, very hard to drive the league – I know that.I still believe the best bet is to go down a similar road to domestic rugby. I think Ireland can absolutely support four really top teams playing in a North Atlantic league or whatever it would be. That would be a very good system. Then have the regional academies under that that would lead to a national academy which I know the FAI have undertaken. But it requires people to realise it takes time and that you need to build the facilities. You need to build the development academy. You need to build the communities. It requires upfront investment and the return on the investment would be some years down the line. It is possible. It’s more challenging than it is here. A lot of the ownership groups over here are involved in multiple sports. Maybe it will take a commitment from a group of individuals who are willing to invest, with an understanding of it being a vision, that it’s the path to get there and when their return on investment will arrive”.Smith has had offers from both clubs and organisations to move back to Europe. But he says his focus is the US. On Saturday, the Rapids got their new season off to a good start with a 1-0 win over New England.With Smith behind the scenes, it should be another eye-catching campaign for them.No Lampard, no Gerrard, no Drogba: new season signals seismic change in MLS attitudeMuch more than Robbie Keane and Kevin Doyle: the Irish history in Major League Soccer “He would’ve been aware that I was interested in moving to MLS at some point. He knew I was doing a lot of work from an analytics perspective. The initial call was that they were looking at bringing someone in as Sporting Director and had some different skills – experience with negotiations, analytics, the business side. Initially I was asked to come over and give an assessment and provide a report. That was July 2014 and then it progressed quickly. Weekly phone-calls with the club to try and prepare for what was happening but it was still very loose. I went back again in the August and was pretty much offered the position. I went back over again in December and was up and running in January 2015. So it happened pretty quickly. The big thing for me was, having known Tim so long, I had a lot of faith in what he was going to build. When he talked to me about the long-term plan, it was something I was very excited about. I had always been interested in this side of the business and it was like the perfect storm – everything came together really nicely. I’m thrilled with the decision. I’ve been back to Europe quite a few times and it’s never really tempted me that much, to be honest. It’s an exciting time to be part of soccer in the US”.Smith has a wide, intimidating remit. He’s responsible for the soccer operations of a club from top-to-bottom. There’s the development of the academy. There’s the senior MLS squad. The coaching staff. The scouting staff. The science and analytics department. He admits it can be very challenging, owing to the volume of work across various aspects of an elite sports organisation. But there’s also the wholly unique Major League Soccer environment.Unfairly, the league is constantly compared to other . But it’s a complex place – still in its infancy, developing an identity and with a mesmerising litany of quirks and idiosyncrasies. Firstly, MLS is single-entity: the league – not the clubs – controls player registrations and contracts. There is a salary-cap. But there are three Designated Players per team who are exceptions to it. There is a draft for younger players, as per other US sports. There is no promotion or relegation. And there are no ‘transfers’, as such. Any trade that happens is done under the supervision of the league and can involve some relentlessly confusing MLS-specific jargon like ‘allocation money’, ‘TAM’ or Generation Adidas. No player deal is ever as straightforward as ‘X signs for Y for Z million’. Even for seasoned MLS reporters, the finer details of the business side of the league are as clear as mud.So, when Smith arrived in MLS, he did so in the off-season – when squad turnover is at its peak, contracts need fresh negotiation and finalising recruitment is a pre-requisite. He needed a crash course in the local language.“There’s a lot going on here”, he says.The understatement leads to inevitable laughter.“It’s a very, very interesting and challenging system. But my background has helped. In Ireland I introduced the Salary Cost Protocol as part of my role with the FAI and had done a lot of investigations into salary caps in various parts of the world as part of that. I followed that up by working on Financial Fair Play with Uefa so I had a very good idea of what was going on and had been following the American system anyway. But it’s only when you get inside and really see the complexity that it all comes into focus. It’s a challenge but a wonderful opportunity too. In salary cap system, theoretically, everyone has the same amount of money to invest. Yes, there are the DPs and certain variants there but, for the most part, we’re all playing on a relatively even foothold. But you have to know where you can gain certain advantages”.One area the Rapids have pinpointed in their search for advantages is analytics. Smith has a long-held fascination with it but acknowledges that it’s just another part of a process. Ignoring everything else and merely focusing on crunching data will end in tears. Still, he’s a numbers nerd, hence the invite from Sloan. And the recent numbers have been good for Colorado.In Smith’s debut season, they endured a dismal campaign. They were the worst team in the Western Conference and second-worst overall. A baptism of fire, certainly. Smith was heavily involved in Colorado signing Tim Howard last year – the goalkeeper proving crucial in their run to the Western Conference final. Source: David ZalubowskiBut, in 2016, there was a complete turnaround. They missed out on the top spot in the West by just two points. They had the best defensive record in the league. They knocked out the LA Galaxy in the conference semi-finals only to lose to eventual MLS Cup winners Seattle in the decider.Data certainly played its part in the Rapids’ upturn.“My interest in it stems from baseball”, Smith says.“I was over in Cape Cod in 1999 on a J1 visa and started to follow the Red Sox. But when you come back to Ireland, the only way you can follow them is in the box scores. Then I started to wonder if it could be translated to soccer. At the time, it couldn’t because there wasn’t enough data but as the whole Moneyball explosion came, people started to understand there was potential there to reap benefits from having more information about what was happening on the field.At the Sloan conference, our panel was discussing what the next big stat will be and when we’re going to get it. The next big metric. And I don’t believe that metric is coming. In baseball, they have a stat called WAR which enables all players to be compared regardless of position. It’s a very easy, nice, all-encompassing number that allows you to compare players. But that’s not going to happen in soccer. The key for us is to use analytics as a tool – as part of how we go out and identify players and what players can fit our system best. That comes from having an over-arching philosophy, a game-model, a clear understanding of what the coaches want players to exhibit in each position and then an ability to determine what metrics most closely correlate with success in those attributes. It’s still at the very, very early stages and has to be used in the right way. If you think data is everything, I’m not sure you’re going to get the best use out of it.One risk is gauging how a player deals with transitioning from one league to another. A former Premier League sporting director once told me about signing a goalkeeper whose numbers were incredibly impressive. But, in a better league, he faced less quantity of shots but more quality. Inevitably, he conceded more goals and made fewer saves. The original numbers were a reflection of a specific environment. So, they were essentially redundant when placed in the context of a different league.Inevitably, the software has moved on since. And such an issue is well-known these days.“From a data perspective, we’re looking at building comparability models”, Smith says. Rapid Revolution: the Irishman making waves in the American sports landscape Padraig Smith has been in Colorado for the last two years as the franchise’s sporting director. Short URL Mar 5th 2017, 10:44 PM 5 Comments Wonderful experience talking ⚽️ analytics with @mixedknuts @daniel_stenz @hendrik & @andrew_wiebe yesterday on #SSAC17 soccer panel pic.twitter.com/94A05BYemS— Padraig Smith (@padraigsmith) March 4, 2017center_img 28,671 Views http://the42.ie/3272140 Source: Padraig Smith/Twitter PADRAIG SMITH HAS just been a panelist at MIT’s much-vaunted Sloan Sports Analytics Conference when we chat.He was part of a group discussion entitled Juggling Expectations: The Emergence of Soccer Analytics. Alongside him were Ted Knutson – the owner and founder of Statsbomb and a former Head of Player Analytics at Brentford and Midtjylland – and Hendrik Almstadt, ex-Arsenal and Aston Villa and now Player Relations Director at the PGA European Tour.The big leagues.“A lot of smart people”, Smith says.“A lot of good, stimulating conversation”.It was his debut as a contributor and he’ll certainly be invited back. Smith, in a very short time immersed in the North American sports landscape, is busily making a name for himself.In November 2014, the Meath native was hired by Major League Soccer side Colorado Rapids as their Sporting Director having previously spent three years with Uefa’s Financial Analysis Group and, before that, a similar stint with the FAI as Internal Compliance Office.“I had known Tim Hinchey (Rapids’ president) for some time – ever since his days with Derby County”, he says. Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article Let’s go @DroghedaUnited …hopefully Fabio has another cup winning performance in him! #FAICupFinal— Padraig Smith (@padraigsmith) November 3, 2013 Source: Padraig Smith/Twitter Colorado Rapids’ manager Pablo Mastroeni. Source: Ted S. Warren“It’s not an exact science yet. You need a far deeper pool of players who have played across multiple leagues so you can really extrapolate and get a better understanding of how that transition will go. There’s still trial and error with this and that’s where the value of subjective scouting becomes so important and understanding the differences in leagues. Certain leagues will exhibit a tactical flavour that’s different from MLS. The Norwegian league is different from the Dutch league which is different from the Belgian league. They all have their own tendencies. So, it’s understanding what you’re looking for. For us, it’s understanding what Pablo (Mastroeni, the Rapids’ manager) wants, understanding what players best fit what he wants and then identify the subjective attributes we see when we scout and the objective performance metrics we can analyse with data and then find and build a profile of a player we think will excel in the system Pablo plays.We’re developing our own proprietary player evaluation system, that’s also a scouting tool. So it looks to combine both objective and subjective measures. And we’re developing an algorithm that will give us a ranking on that basis. We obtain information from a lot of different sources and it’s about refining that and building your own model that allows you to best use that information”.The Rapids are owned by Stan Kroenke, who has a wide portfolio of sporting interests as part of his KSE group. What that means is that Smith and his colleagues have a litany of resources at their disposal and a litany of brains to pick. Source: Richard Vogel“We’re part of such a large sporting group with Arsenal in the Premier League, the Colorado Avalanche in the NHL, the Denver Nuggets in the NBA, we have the Mammoth who play in the lacrosse league”, he says.“In our headquarters downtown, we have a KSE analytics department. We have a full-time analyst with the Rapids but also have this access to a level of expertise that no other club in MLS has, in my opinion. We can bounce ideas off these guys. We can take models they’ve built – particularly in the comparability area – where they’ve investigated how a player can translate from the Canadian amateur league to the NHL. It may not be completely appropriate but it gives us a starting point that’s very useful. And it’s great to sit with these guys and think about things in a different way and not be focused on the prevailing wisdom in soccer. We like to try and think outside the box and examine different areas to see if we can gain marginal advantages we think will be hugely beneficial to us”.It’s all a reminder of where MLS is and how far its come.The perception is of a hokey, half-hearted place filled with fading veterans well past their sell-by date and with the majority of squads made up by a litany of well-intentioned but very limited players. Certainly, the league has had its misguided moments. But in recent seasons, it has emerged as a solid, dependable product.In the past four years, there have been four different champions. The bulk of the US and Canadian national teams now ply their trade in MLS. Some expensive high-profile talent have struggled – namely Steven Gerrard and Frank Lampard – and were quickly cut. The fanbase has grown smarter and is now acutely aware that the sprinkling of stardust is not a tangible long-term strategy.For years, experience was crucial to MLS teams and they were regularly flooded with players in the twilight of their careers. But there has been a shift. Supporters are now more excited at the prospect of young, exciting talent like Jordan Morris and Jack Harrison than some bloated, ageing import. And so are the franchises.“If you look at the average age of the teams now, it’s well below 30″, Smith says. Jordan Morris, who plays with the Seattle Sounders, is well-regarded and an exciting young prospect. Source: Ted S. Warren“We’re in a space now where, outside of the top-5 leagues in the world, we can compete financially with anyone else. There’s an attractiveness for players to come over here that’s really helping us identify and recruit better talent. The league has grown immeasurably. The TV deals have exposed other players around the world to what’s going on in MLS. And that entices more to come over. And for younger players, they’re now saying, ‘This is a league of choice for me  – this is where I want to be’. This season will be exciting because of that young talent”.So, is MLS now an attractive proposition for young players? Do they feel their game can genuinely develop in North America? Or does it remain a hard sell? Would they rather toil in England’s lower leagues because it’s expected?“MLS is a viable option”, Smith says.“It’s something players will look at more and more and start to understand that they can develop here, particularly as the coaching has improved. MLS and US Soccer have done a great job in ensuring there are Pro-Licence courses for the coaches and by introducing minimum standards for coaches. That’s been tremendous and there are some fantastic coaches in the MLS structure – and the development academy structure as well.There’s real merit in looking at the collegiate route here as well. It gives players the chance to come through into a professional environment – maybe not at the MLS level but the emergence of the USL has been a real boost. One of the key things I learned at Uefa is the number of players who often go unpaid. And that’s another very attractive thing in the US: there’s certainty of wage. That’s something that not all professional footballers in Europe can say. There’s also the lifestyle element – it’s a wonderful place to live – and all of that put together will make it increasingly attractive for young players to move here”.Still, it’s a challenging place. Certain off-field factors can throw even the most seasoned veteran.“The travel and the climate are the ones that get you the most”, Smith says. Steven Gerrard wasn’t the only high-profile player to find MLS a lot tougher than he expected. Source: Ringo H.W. Chiu“During this season, we’ll play a game here in Colorado on a Saturday, travel to Chicago to play on a Wednesday, then travel to Philadelphia to play the following Saturday. You’re crossing two different time-zones. You’re dealing with different climates in both areas. There’s a possibility you can be playing in what’s known as ‘The Oven’ – that’s Houston – in the middle of July with 100% humidity. Here in Colorado, we’re a mile above sea level – that’s an incredible challenge for players to walk into. We believe it takes about a year for a player to come over and truly integrate into US football. Some guys, like Nicolas Lodeiro with Seattle, can come in and hit the ground running – that will happen too. But in general, if you want to judge a player over here who’s coming in from Europe particularly, it’s only fair to give them time – whether that’s six months, 12 months – they need to acclimatise”.Smith has been in Major League Soccer for two years now. It’s a place that has had its difficulties but struggled on, found a strong identity and now continues to develop each year.Could the League of Ireland learn anything from the MLS approach?“I think about it all the time”, he admits.last_img read more

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Pochettino hails Spurs heroes after 31 win

first_imgTottenham boss Mauricio Pochettino heaped praise on his players following today’s 3-1 win over Leicester City.Davinson Sanchez netted an early opener for Spurs after being set-up by Christian Eriksen with the Danish playmaker later getting on the scoresheet himself in the 33rd-minute of the match.Son Heung-min then scored a stoppage-time third goal after Jaime Vardy had briefly put Leicester back into contention.The 3-1 win moves Spurs back to within five points of leaders Manchester City in third-place in the Premier League.“It’s a good time with the circumstances [to win]. I think my players are heroes. I repeat because our effort was amazing,” said Pochettino, according to Sky Sports.“Again we are there, we are fighting and showing great character. Like this afternoon it maybe wasn’t our best performance, and it’s impossible during 10 minutes to be at the same level, but we’re still in it.”The Argentine coach insists Son was unfairly booked as he didn’t dive in the area from Harry Maguire’s challenge.He added: “It wasn’t simulation first of all. It was a little bit unlucky.“During the game the referee was good but we didn’t have luck in that situation because that was a clear penalty.“Son, when he scored the third goal, he showed how he is with his character, personality and capacity to run more than 90 minutes.Harry Maguire, Manchester UnitedLiverpool legend Nicol slams Harry Maguire’s Man United form Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Steve Nicol believes Harry Maguire has made some “horrendous mistakes” recently, and has failed to find his best form since joining Manchester United.“It was a fantastic effort from him, great quality finishing and I was so happy for him because it was the key moment to feel a big relief after the whole game.”Pochettino also provided an update on Eriksen’s future at Spurs following another superb performance today.“We’ve spoken a lot about that, now we need to keep going, for him to continue performing in his best and of course I told you before he’s such an important player for us,” He added on Football London.“We’ll see what happens. I think I’ve used a few metaphors in the past about Christian, remember related with my family and my dog.“He needs to feel freedom to take his decisions. I think keeping going, so happy with him and we’ll see what happens in the end.”Spurs will next host German giants Borussia Dortmund at Wembley for the first leg of their last-16 Champions League clash.Another huge three points in the bag! 💪#COYS pic.twitter.com/oSBjLa9gL5— Tottenham Hotspur (@SpursOfficial) February 10, 2019last_img read more

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POLICE LOG for April 20 Serious Car Crash With Injuries Car vs

first_imgHopkins Street is closed to through traffic due to a serious motor vehicle crash just before the #Billerica Line. Seek alternate routes. #WilmingtonMA pic.twitter.com/D4Gp5PLWrj— Wilmington MA Police (@WilmingtonMAPD) April 20, 2018—(DISCLAIMER: This information is public information.  An arrest does not constitute a conviction.  Any arrested person is innocent until proven guilty.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip?Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedPOLICE LOG for September 5: Train Conductor Helps Locate Missing Puppy; Rented Trucks Not Returned To UHaulIn “Police Log”POLICE LOG for July 27: OUI Arrest; Woman Brings Caged Bird To Town BeachIn “Police Log”POLICE LOG for July 25: Wilmington Man Arrested For OUI; Men Carrying Sledgehammers Down Street; Turkeys Causing TrafficIn “Police Log” WILMINGTON, MA — Here are highlights from the Wilmington Police Log for Friday, April 20, 2018:A Fitz Terrace caller reported a male party was fishing on private property. Police responded and moved the man along. (8:03am)A vehicle stroke a pole on Grove Avenue. No injuries noted. RMLD notified. (1:45pm)Police was flagged down by passerby complaining there was a dog on town beach. Police advised the dog owner and moved them along. (5:49pm)A walk-in party reported she was the victim of a fraud. (5:52pm)A bad 2-vehicle crash, with injuries and an entrapment, took place between a black 2005 Honda Civic and blue 2008 Toyota Prius at Hopkins Street and Dorchester Street. One driver was unconscious, the other was entrapped. Road was shutdown. A mailbox was damaged due to the accident. A dog, which was in one of the vehicles, was transported to the vet. Tewksbury, Billerica and Burlington Fire Departments also responded and/or provided mutual coverage. Police filed an immediate threat against the operator of the Honda and faxed the paperwork to the RMV.  (6:30pm)—last_img read more

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WATCH Congress leader in Telangana gets into fist fight with local worker

first_imgEmbarrassing moments are piling up by the dozen for political parties as the fifth phase of the Lok Sabha elections is just around the corner.The most recent incident took place on May 11, Saturday, in Telangana when Congress MP Hanumantha Rao got into a fight with a local Congress party leader, Nagesh Mudiraj, and their entire scuffle was filmed. Hanumantha Rao is a senior Congress leader in Telangana and also served as a Union minister. #WATCH Telangana: A scuffle broke out between Congress leaders V Hanumantha Rao and Nagesh Mudiraj during the protest by opposition parties today in Hyderabad against state govt over the issue of state board intermediate results. pic.twitter.com/lyUsD8ZDKU— ANI (@ANI) May 11, 2019They were allegedly fighting over the seating arrangement on the stage and the argument led to blows. The fight then escalated to such an extent that the duo began to drag each other off the stage and to the ground. They only stopped when other leaders came in between and physically put an end to the fight.The incident happened during a meeting organised by the Opposition parties to rally against the TRS government and the irregularities of the results of the state board examinations which led to the suicides of 22 students. The opposition parties included Telugu Desam Party, Left and Congress.The TRS government had set up a committee last month to look into the IT firm which was involved in the publication of the exam results. Many students had resorted to suicide after their intermediate exam results showed that they had failed the exams.last_img read more

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Celebrities face up to 3year ban heavy penalty for misleading ads in

first_img[Representational image]Creative CommonsThe new Consumer Protection Bill is no good news for celebrities — they will be made accountable for misleading ads and will have to pay dearly for the offence.  The Consumer Protection Bill, 2018 proposes that the celebrities endorsing misleading ads should be made to pay penalty up to Rs 50 lakh and serve a ban from making an endorsement of any product or service of up to three years. However, the bill did not include an earlier recommendation by a Parliamentary Standing Committee to impose jail term for deceptive endorsements.The bill, which seeks to replace the 31-year-old law in force now, was introduced by Consumer Affairs Minister Ram Vilas Paswan in the Lok Sabha.The bill is awaiting clearance by Parliament. The main thrust of the new Consumer Protection Bill is to eliminate the false and misleading advertisements. A Central Consumer Protection Authority (CCPA) is also proposed in the bill.  If it is clear to the CCPA that a particular advertisement is false or misleading, the authority may issue directions to endorsers, advertiser, publisher and traders and manufacturers to stop or make changes. Also the CCPA have the right to impose a penalty of up to Rs 1 million on endorsers and manufacturers. If subsequent violation happens penalty will be of up to Rs 5 million.The authority will also have the power to ban endorser of false or misleading ads from making an endorsement of any product or service for a period of one year, the subsequent violation will attract a ban of up to three years.”No endorser shall be liable to a penalty if he has exercised due diligence to verify the veracity of the claims made in the advertisement regarding the product or service being endorsed by him,” the bill said, reports PTI.The Parliamentary Standing Committee that reviews the Consumer Protection Bill, 2015, had suggested strict penalty and jail term for endorsers of misleading ads. Although, the government did not accept the recommendation of jail term and has instead proposed ban of up to three years. In case of those publishing misleading ads, the Bill empowers CCPA to slap a penalty of up to Rs 1 million. Although, no penalty will be levied if publishers prove that the ad was published in the ordinary course of their business.”No defence shall be available to such person if he had previous knowledge of the order passed by the CCPA for withdrawal of or modification of such advertisement,” the bill said.last_img read more

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Indias largest cookiemaker Parle may cut up to 10000 jobs amid economic

first_imgFacebook/Parle GParle Products Pvt Ltd, a leading Indian biscuit maker, might lay off up to 10,000 workers as slowing economic growth and falling demand in the rural heartland could cause production cuts, a company executive said on Wednesday.A downturn in Asia’s third-largest economy is denting sales of everything from cars to clothing, forcing companies to curtail production and raising hopes that the India government will unveil an economic stimulus to revive growth.A sharp drop in Parle’s biscuit sales means the company may have to slash production, which may result in layoffs of 8,000-10,000 people, Mayank Shah, category head at Parle, said in a telephone interview from Mumbai.”The situation is so bad, that if the government doesn’t intervene immediately … we may be forced to eliminate these positions,” he said.Parle, founded in 1929, employs about 100,000 people, including direct and contract workers across 10 company-owned facilities and 125 contract manufacturing plants.Shah said demand for popular Parle biscuit brands such as Parle-G had been worsening since India rolled out a nationwide goods and services tax (GST) in 2017, which imposed a higher levy on biscuits costing as low as 5 rupees, or 7 cents a pack.The higher taxes have forced Parle to offer fewer biscuits in each pack, hitting demand from lower-income consumers in rural India, which contributes more than half of Parle’s revenue and where two-thirds of Indians live.”Consumers here are extremely price-sensitive. They’re extremely conscious of how many biscuits they are getting for a particular price,” Shah said.Parle, which has an annual revenue of above $1.4 billion, held talks over the past year with the government’s GST council as well as former Finance Minister Arun Jaitley, asking them to review tax rates, Shah added.Once known as Parle Gluco, the Mumbai-headquartered company’s flagship biscuit brand was renamed as Parle-G, and became a household name in India through the 1980s and 1990s. In 2003, Parle-G was considered the world’s largest selling biscuit brand.The slowdown in India’s economic growth, which has already led to thousands of job losses in its crucial automotive industry, was accelerating the drop in demand, Shah said.Market research firm Nielsen said last month India’s consumer goods industry was losing steam as spending in the rural heartland cools and small manufacturers lose competitive advantages in a slowing economy.Parle is not the only food product company to have flagged slowing demand.Varun Berry, managing director of Britannia Industries Ltd (BRIT.NS), Parle’s main competitor, said earlier this month that consumers were “thinking twice” about buying products worth just 5 rupees.”Obviously, there is some serious issue in the economy,” Berry had said on a conference call with analysts.Shares in Britannia were down 1.5%, as of 0620 GMT, having fallen as much as 3.9% earlier on Wednesday.last_img read more

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Texas Transportation Nonprofit To Advocate For Toll Roads

first_img Share An advocacy group troubled by scarce funding to ease traffic congestion in Texas’ metro regions is taking on tea party activists who oppose toll roads.The Dallas Morning News reports that business groups, local elected officials and highway industry interests have formed Texans for Traffic Relief. The group targets commuters to raise awareness about the lack of funds needed to ease traffic in North Texas, Houston, San Antonio and Austin.The nonprofit plans to educate commuters on toll roads, projects that relied on private companies or government toll agencies to put up capital or take on debt for up-front construction costs. Drivers’ tolls are then used to repay those costs over time.The tea party has opposed both tolls and what it says is excessive state debt.___Information from: The Dallas Morning News, http://www.dallasnews.comlast_img read more

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Tonight AFROs First Edition with Sean Yoes Friday August 18

first_imgListen at WEAA Live Stream: http://amber.streamguys.com.4020/live.m3uA review of some of the top news stories of the week directly from the pages of the AFRO, with managing editor Kamau High, including breaking details on the resignation of top Trump adviser Steve Bannon. Plus, The Mod Squad, Taya Graham and Stephen Janis of The Real News Network report on law enforcement and politics.These stories and much more on AFRO’s First Edition with Sean Yoes, Monday through Friday, 5-7 p.m.last_img

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Hill Earns CoSIDA Hall of Fame Honor

first_imgBy Mark F. Gray, Special to the AFROEd Hill was an understated spokesman for Howard University. In 30 years as sports information director for the Bison athletic program, Hill was more than a disseminator of information about the games students played. He was a mentor, instructor, confidant and friend for scores of young men and women who have played pro sports and ascended to prominent roles in the sports media industry.His professional life was highlighted when the College Sports Information Directors Association (CoSIDA) inducted him into their hall of fame during the annual convention at Gaylord Resort at National Harbor.Former Howard University Sports Information Director Ed Hill (2nd from left) with members of the 2018 CoSIDA Hall of Fame class following induction ceremonies at the Gaylord Hotel in Oxon Hill, MD (photo by Mark Gray).“You couldn’t have written a better script,” Hill told the AFRO. “Hall of fame, Washington, D.C., all of my friends, family, and mentors here to share in this moment, it doesn’t get any better than this.”Hill, who retired at the end of the 2016-2017 athletic season, never wanted the spotlight. He mastered the art of putting the shine on the accomplishments of players and teams who made history. However, he did take one last victory lap through the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference where he was honored by the schools in the league. Hill was treated as royalty by his MEAC brethren in a manner befitting a retiring pro athlete.On every campus, when Howard visited for their annual basketball games, the already minted MEAC hall of famer was showered with gifts and platitudes during his own special night. Ultimately it was his peers in the conference who lobbied for Hill’s place in CoSIDA history. It was as important to them, as it was for Hill, to make sure when he was honored amongst the all-time greats in his profession.“I’m quite proud to have Ed Hill as a longtime colleague and friend,” said former South Carolina State SID Bill Hamilton. “We pushed hard and lobbied vigorously to make sure that he would be honored in his own backyard, so his family and friends could share in his moment with him.”During the ascension of Black College football into the mainstream of college sports during the late 1980s and early 1990s, Hill’s marketing acumen brought credibility to Howard’s program. His two best marketing campaigns were for Howard quarterbacks Jay “Sky” Walker and Ted “Sweet Flight” White. Both signal callers led the Bison to HBCU national championships and played in the NFL. Their visibility was increased by clever designs of media guide covers and the reliability of Hill to consistently provide quality information, making it easier to get coverage from conventional media.Hill’s career began as a sportswriter with the Winston Salem Chronicle which gave him a perspective on how to develop relationships with sports journalists. He was relentless in providing information and accommodating the press despite the lack of space in facilities that remain less than state of the art at Greene Stadium and in Burr Gymnasium. Despite Howard’s lack of resources Hill’s professional resilience continued.Beyond his acumen in media and public relations, Hill’s mentoring and guidance helped mold many of today’s most prominent sports journalists at major networks and media relations professionals from his cramped work office space inside Drew Hall. Today that mentoring carries on into the streets of D.C.“We’re facing a lot of problems and I’m hoping to coalesce with other people to make a difference,” said Hill.last_img read more

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Govt alarmed over functioning of toll plazas by pvt players including R

first_imgIn a major breach of contract, the government has raised serious concern over the functioning of ‘toll plazas’ operated by private players including Reliance Infrastructure Ltd. for suppressing the ‘escrow accounts’.The total volume of the ‘irregularities’ was found to be around Rs. 903 crore, which was raised but was not deposited in the escrow accounts as per agreed terms by the private players. The ‘escrow account’ is a temporary pass through account held by third party during the process of a transaction (of toll collection) between the two parties. It was learnt that on March 10, 2010, the NHAI had an agreement with the M/s PS Toll Road Pvt. Ltd of Reliance Infrastructure for the development, maintenance and management of National Highway No. 4 (approx. 140.35 km). Also Read – Need to understand why law graduate’s natural choice is not legal profession: CJIIn the agreement it was decided to augment the existing road of nearly 140.35 km on the Pune-Satara section of National Highway No. 4 in Maharashtra to six-Lane under Design, Build, Finance, Operate and Transfer (DBFOT) basis.However, it was found that despite incomplete work ‘as per the Concessionaire Agreement (CA) with the NHAI,’ the company continues to collect toll from October 1, 2010 to March 2014. Sources said, during these periods they managed to collect more than Rs. 500 but ‘surprisingly’ diverted nearly half of the amount (till August 2012) and invested it in Reliance Liquid Fund (RLF), which is against the CA. Also Read – Health remains key challenge in India’s development: KovindIt was found that on September 1, 2014, M/s PS Toll Road Pvt. Ltd in a letter to the NHAI’s Project Director claimed that work has been completed on the on the Pune-Satara section. A senior official of the company Nagendra Rai in his letter to NHAI mentioned, “We would like to inform that the old toll plaza structure has been completely removed and the surface treatment has been completed.”But, on September 9, 2014, the General Manager (Tech), NHAI, Rajesh K. Kaundal in a reply letter, to the company mentioned that, “It is seen that concessionaire has submitted the compliance after a period of about nine months and that to it is incomplete action on the part of concessionaire, as removal of old toll plazas structure is yet to be done. In view of above it is requested to take immediate action on removal of the structure without loss of further time.”last_img read more

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How do we keep our invoices from landing in clients bulk mail

first_img Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals min read Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. Bulk e-mail folders and “false positives” for spam filters are the bain of an honest company’s existence. It makes it so hard to get e-mail delivered to anyone.The best way to do this is to ask your clients to “white list” the e-mail address that the invoices come from. They can do this with the help of the IT department or, for smaller companies, the hosting company will be able to help create rules in their e-mail software to eliminate this problem.You might also want to look into an online invoicing system in which an actual invoice isn’t delivered, but a link to an online invoice is. Hope this helps,Lena August 14, 2008 Register Now »last_img read more

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Meet Vieworks Most Advanced Xray Solution at RSNA 2018 Booth 3711 South

first_imgFind more news and videos from AAPM. Conference Coverage View all 396 items Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Find more SCCT news and videos Women’s Health View all 62 items Find more SCCT news and videos Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more SCCT news and videos Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:27Loaded: 0.00%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:27 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Find more SCCT news and videos Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Sponsored Content | Videos | Digital Radiography (DR) | November 12, 2018 Meet Vieworks’ Most Advanced X-ray Solution at RSNA 2018, Booth 3711 (South Hall) Technology Reports View all 9 items Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. VIVIX-S 1417N is a multi-purpose portable flat panel detector for addressing busy workflow in medical facilities. Get more information on our advanced detectors and software lineup at www.vieworks.com.Watch the VIDEO here. Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Information Technology View all 220 items Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.center_img Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Recent Videos View all 606 items Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Find more news and videos from AAPM. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Sponsored Videos View all 142 items last_img read more

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Breeders are torn On the one hand most want thei

first_imgBreeders are torn. On the one hand, most want their growers to succeed and recognize that allowing too much production or production in competitive regions is problematic. Yet, most make their money by allowing additional plantings.It is more than the volume of planting that is at stake; it is the very role of proprietary genetics and branding that is under discussion. A producer in a country with a license for a desirable variety and the right to use a brand name may learn that a nearby country, with identical or overlapping seasons, is getting into grapes. This producer is not worried though. He has the desired variety and brand.What this shipper wants is to use the variety and the brand as a kind of moat protecting his market share. He wants to be able to say to a retailer who is threatening to move to the new producing area, ”Well, you can buy grapes there, but you can’t buy the variety and brand that your customers love because they do not have a license.”The breeder, though, is very likely to think that its variety has an X% market share and it wants to maintain that market share. So, if a new producing area is being planted, the breeder will want to plant there too.Retailers have a similar issue. They not only want to carry tasty produce, but they also want to carry items that will give the retailer an advantage in attracting and retaining customers over other retailers. In the past, this has typically taken the form of short-term exclusives when a variety is just coming into mass production or a geographic exclusive or class of trade exclusive.But, perhaps, retailers might want to own desirable varieties and use them to anchor private label programs. Indeed, Costco, with chicken, and Walmart, with beef, have recently decided to experiment with setting up their own supply chains. Is it so crazy to think that produce could follow this model in the future?These are just a few of the issues confronting the modern table grape industry. There are other issues, of course, such as bringing robots into harvesting and packing, and there are many trade issues too. My family used to export quite a few grapes to the UK from California. Now Mexico and Egypt have replaced California in the early season in the UK. Peru has replaced California in the late season market. Peru has duty-free status and California pays significant duties. An issue with Brexit: during the EU season, the duty is 17%, so if the UK is out of the EU, what will happen? Will the UK continue to treat Spain and Italy more favorably than California? Why would they do that?In North America, Sun World recently announced that it was broadening its roster of licensed importers and, in fact, it was doing so at the request of its southern hemisphere licensees. So, now, Camposol Fresh U.S.A., Inc., The Oppenheimer Group, Dayka & Hackett LLC, Divine Flavor International LLC, Dole Fresh Fruit Co., Fresh Flavor International, Inc.; North American Produce Buyers Limited CCPC, Summit Produce, Inc., Vanguard Direct LLC, and, William H. Kopke Jr., Inc./Southern Fruit Import Co. are all licensed to import and market the Sun World varieties such as AUTUMNCRISP, MIDNIGHT BEAUTY and SCARLOTTA SEEDLESS.It is not surprising that producers would like more choice. After all, these producers already have importers they work with; they have varieties from several sources and would like to work with one importer. Plus, some of these importers have loyal customers difficult to access if you don’t work with them.Choice is considered a good thing. But there is a question to be answered here: Will having multiple importers raise or lower prices? We don’t know the answer to that. Perhaps having a roster of powerful importers can push through volume and that will lead to higher prices. Some would argue, though, that having multiple importers means they will undercut each other to get the business and that having just one importer would maximize pricing.One of the “Big Four” breeders recently sent a notice to its licensees explaining that, although in the past it was “very flexible and accommodating” when it came to the use of trademarks and the interpretation of quality standards. But now, the breeder is going to “provide more guidance and structure.” How, exactly, will this be carried out?If product is sub-standard, no breeder wants it under its branding. So the breeder may recommend it be sold as a generic seedless grape. But some varieties have distinctive taste profiles, and consumers will object if they buy some generic black grape and find out it is licorice-flavored.The issues are many, and the stress is palpable. When we launched PRODUCE BUSINESS magazine back in 1985, we committed to an identity — that our role would be to “Initiate Industry Improvement.” To help the industry wrestle with issues such as these, we are launching a new event, the Global Grape Summit and co-locating it with The London Produce Show and Conference. The idea, as with our Global Cherry Summit, is to gather the best and the brightest thought- and practice-leaders of the global grape trade to share information, ideas and build a brighter future for the industry.It is our great pleasure to unveil the agenda for the first annual Global Grape Summit.It is an assemblage of speakers never seen before, and the attendees are thought- and practice-leaders from across the global grape community.In attendance — and contributing a crystal ball to the event — will be four major grape breeders: Sun World Innovations, SNFL Group, IFG and ARRA Varieties. Each breeder will bring cutting-edge knowledge of what the future holds for grapes.Attendees are coming from all corners of the globe to learn, reinforce old relationships and establish new ones. All will participate in defining the future of the global grape industry. If you participate in this industry on the buy, sell or supply chain side of things, you will want to be in the room where it happens. Plus, after the Global Grape Summit, the delegates will be #CelebratingFresh along with the entire industry during the Opening Reception for The London Produce Show and Conference.This will surely be a fantastic marketing event, which includes displays from more than 25 grape marketers from around the world.So come to London, join the Global Grape Summit and The London Produce Show and Conference for a one-two punch that will transform your business and set you up, personally, for greater success.Here are the websites:Global Grape SummitThe London Produce Show and ConferenceYou can register on either website or right here.If you have any questions or need any help don’t hesitate to email us here.Come to London, Come be a part of building the industry of tomorrow. Come be in the room where it happens. London gears up for Global Grape Summit tomorrow … Global Grape Summit wrap-up part two: Consumer res … Peruvian table grape industry growth to be analyze … From the pages of Jim Prevor’s Perishable PunditThe success of the produce industry — whether judged in financial terms, or the ability to increase consumption, or the sustaining of the agricultural economy with the environmental and social benefits that flow from all this — hinges on individual crops being successful.This is especially true of the largest and most important crops, such as table grapes, which are always a Top Five fruit in terms of sales to consumers and a crop experiencing an explosion of innovation — both in varieties and business models.Yet, as is always the case, the same innovation that offers hope and optimism for the future of the category threatens the established order of things and thus the supremacy of established interests.We wrote recently about the decision of Sun World International to divest its growing operation and refocus on its Sun World Innovations unit — a sure sign that at least one savvy player sees the value-add in the industry as coming from genetics, licensing, branding, etc.Now, long term, of course, it is unlikely that this business can succeed if the growing community does not prosper. In the same article, we pointed out some deep concerns of the California grape growing community:1) California’s minimum wage law raising the cost of production.2) Worldwide over-production of grapes.3) Mexico on the front end and Peru on the back end, eliminating the once profitable shoulder seasons.4) Many new varieties not delivering on a promise of better taste, but still costing in royalties and licensing fees.5) Consolidation on the buying end of the business, allowing for great pricing pressure to be put on producers.6) Spain and other producers competing for Asian business that once was exclusively a market for California grapes.Of course, many of these concerns are global. In Spain, they worry about Morocco; in Chile they worry about massive plantings in Peru, etc., etc.Clearly the advent of proprietary genetics has been a game-changer. Indeed, when one looks closely at regions or countries that have bad seasons, you often see a bifurcation in the market — that those with superior varieties did much better with direct retail sales, while older non-proprietary varieties struggled to find a place in the market, sometimes winding up being cuffed to terminal markets with concomitant pricing pressure.Yet the role that proprietary varieties will play is still uncertain. Phil Macy, Category Buyer for Grapes and Stone Fruit at Sam’s Club, has positioned himself as an advocate for the new varieties. Pat Burlinguette, Fresh Foods Buyer at Costco Wholesale Canada, has been slower to the party. Not so many years ago, speaking on grape varieties, she explained, “If I could get a good Thompson Seedless and Crimson 52 weeks a year…that’s all I would need.”Today, Pat and much of the industry have come to embrace many new varieties.It is, however, hard to know the actual importance of varieties in this decision-making process.There is a kind of selection bias leading to new varieties. After all, the newer plantings and better growers are both heavier to newer varieties. If buyers aren’t ‘variety-specific’, they will tend to get product from older vineyards and the varieties that are out of favor. It happens when you get a buyer who ‘will take anything’. Then shippers have a tendency to push the limit, fool themselves that ‘this is what the customer wants’ and kill the goose that lays the golden eggs.So, some shipper winds up slamming too many vintage reds down some buyer’s throat, and the buyers start to change their way of thinking.So today, many buyers have their lists of preferred varieties — not all new — a list of varieties they will take if they have to do so from companies that have the varieties these buyers really want, and varieties — old and new — that these buyers do not want at all.In this continuum of acceptance — required, preferred, indifferent, discouraged, prohibited — many buyers are evolving into identifying an acceptable group of varieties, among which they are indifferent — price, quality, service, loyalty become the factors. They are also evolving into identifying a prohibited group of varieties.This is all very problematic for the grape industry. In theory, proprietary varieties could be the answer to change the power structure between consolidating retailers and, in this case, grape growers.If everyone has a Thompson seedless, buyers can play one vendor off another and drive the price down. If the buyers must have a particular variety and that variety has been restricted, the grower has much more power.Occasionally a really unique variety comes up and, indeed, retailers complain about the producers and marketers in control of such varieties, demanding potentially illegal tying arrangements in which the power of the seller is so great he can demand that the buyer purchase other products in order to secure the desired product.Mostly though, the grape industry has not been successful at getting the consumer loyalty that would compel retail loyalty. This is not to say that many retailers don’t have strong preferences. They may do their own taste tests or just prefer to work with certain producers. The licensing model that is prevalent in the grape industry has led to massive and global investment in new varieties. But it is weaker on the branding side than, say, the Driscoll’s model on berries — so retailers tell us they feel compelled to stock Driscoll’s — but are much more flexible on grapes.center_img May 30 , 2019 You might also be interested in ‘What does it take to win with new grape varieties …last_img read more

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