Scaling Summits

first_imgFifty years later, the man who first stood on the roof of the world lamented how Mount Everest had changed since his historic summit.“It is hardly mountaineering; more like a conducted tour,” Sir Edmund Hillary told reporters in Katmandu in 2003, celebrating the anniversary of his and Sherpa Tenzing Norgay’s historic 1953 climb of the 8,849.8-meter (29,035-foot) summit.“Commercial climbing has developed, with many inexperienced enthusiasts, dozens of aluminum ladders, thousands of meters of fixed rope,” he said.Hillary, a lanky New Zealand beekeeper who became one of the 20th century’s most famous explorers, died Jan. 11 of a heart attack at age 88. He lived long enough to see the Himalayas, once an impossibly isolated region, become a popular destination for anyone with the tens of thousands of dollars it costs to join a commercial expedition to the highest peaks.“I think the whole attitude toward climbing Mount Everest has become rather horrifying. The people just want to get to the top,” he told a newspaper in New Zealand in 2006, after a young British mountaineer died high on Everest after dozens of climbers passed by him and did nothing to help. Tenzing Norgay of Nepal and Edmund P. Hillary of New Zealand in 1953. AP It was different in Hillary’s day.“Hillary was lucky enough to live at a time when Everest was still unconquered,” said Italian mountaineer Reinhold Messner from Bolzano, Italy, in the mountainous South Tirol region.Messner, who soloed Everest in 1980 without supplemental bottled oxygen and became the first person to climb the world’s 14 peaks that are higher than 8,000 meters (yards), lauded Hillary as a man who had “the courage to dare.”Today, he said, mountaineers “have better equipment, we know almost everything, we can even make calls with a satellite phone from Everest’s peak.”But if wealthy dilettantes on commercial expeditions are a modern mountaineering cliche, and thefts increasingly common in crowded Himalayan base camps and even in some climbers’ camps higher above, the serious alpinists are still there.It’s just that, very often, they’re no longer on Everest.“The joy of adventure has been taken away” on Everest, said retired Indian army colonel Narender Kumar, 74, who missed the summit by 200 meters (yards) in 1960.With lighter gear, high-tech equipment and fabrics, more knowledge of the areas, better physical training and reliable bottled oxygen, the frontiers of climbing can be pushed today far beyond what was done in Hillary’s time.“Things that we thought were impossible are being done,” Kumar said.These days, the greatest challenges are often more complex than simply reaching the top. A small circle of serious high-altitude alpinists try going in winter, or solo, or in fast and light teams of two. From the Himalayas to the Karakoram to Patagonia, some are pushing the limits of difficult rock and ice climbing at higher altitudes.The climbing philosophy that Messner pushed – using “fair means,” with no porters and little other backup support, and using no bottled oxygen or ladders to cross crevasses – has become the guiding philosophy to a new generation of mountaineers.The stories that grip climbers in those circles are of a Russian team that summited a brutal unclimbed face of the world’s second-highest peak, K2, stopping only to rescue teammates hit by altitude sickness; a Slovenian who soloed the south face of Annapurna; the Americans who pioneered a new route up Nanga Parbat’s giant Rupal Face, first climbed by Messner; the Russian-American trying to make the first solo winter ascent of Mount McKinley, North America’s highest peak.There are still many challenges out there, including some high unclimbed peaks and forbidding mountain faces in China and India. “People are taking chances with difficult expeditions we couldn’t even imagine,” Kumar said. Edmund Hillary at Scott Base, Antarctica, in January 2007.Some mountaineers have also tried to follow Hillary’s example by becoming conservationists or working on behalf of the often desperately poor Himalayan villagers who live in the shadow of the highest mountains.In Katmandu a small group gathered on the lawn of the Nepal Mountaineering Association’s Katmandu headquarters to remember Hillary and what he’d done here – from his summit of Everest to the schools, hospitals and clinics he’d helped fund and build for Sherpa villages.Ang Rita, who heads the Himalayan Trust, the group Hillary founded in 1962 to help develop the region around Everest, said Hillary’s schools helped thousands of people.“He helped the Sherpa people with education and health, and is responsible for whatever development that has happened in the area,” he said as the sun fell and the Himalayan cold began to bite.“People may remember him as the conqueror of Everest, but I think he would like to be remembered for the work he did for the Sherpa people.”   Related Itemslast_img read more

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Man behind Maggi ban moved out of FSSAI, shifted to Niti Aayog

first_imgFood safety watchdog FSSAI’s CEO Yudhvir Singh Malik, the man behind the ban of global giant Nestle’s popular noodle brand Maggi, was on Tuesday moved out and shifted as Additional Secretary in Niti Aayog.Malik, a 1983 batch IAS officer of Haryana cadre, was appointed to the post of Chief Executive Officer in Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) under Health and Family Welfare Ministry, only in September last year.The Appointments Committee of Cabinet(ACC) headed by Prime Minister Narendra Modi has approved the appointment of Malik as Additional Secretary in the Niti Aayog, an order issued by Personnel Ministry said.He has been appointed in the newly created post by cancelling the appointment of Keshni Anand Arora, his batch mate from the same cadre.It was during Malik’s tenure that samples of Maggi noodle samples were subjected to lab tests which found that it contained added Monosodium Glutamate (MSG) and lead in excess of the permissible limit.FSSAI had on June 5 banned the instant snack that has had a level of global resonance that’s unprecedented for the Indian food regulator.However, the ban was later lifted by the Bombay High Court with the condition that manufacturing and selling would be allowed only after fresh tests.The ACC also approved appointments of Kavita Gupta and Kiran Soni Gupta as Textile Commissioner and Additional Secretary and Financial Adviser in Ministry of Youth Affairs and Sports respectively.last_img read more

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Report: Cleveland Cavaliers Fire Head Coach David Blatt

first_imgLeBron James is surrounded by reporters discussing Ben Simmons.LeBron James Ben SimmonsUpdate: Wojnarowski is also reporting that Cleveland’s next head coach will be assistant Tyronn Lue. Lue and the team have already agree to a multi-year deal.Assistant Ty Lue has agreed to a multi-year deal as new Cavaliers head coach, league sources tell Yahoo Sports.— Adrian Wojnarowski (@WojVerticalNBA) January 22, 2016Earlier: Despite posting a 30-11 record and currently holding the No. 1 seed in the NBA’s Eastern Conference, it’s been reported by Yahoo’s Adrian Wojnarowski that the Cleveland Cavaliers have fired head coach David Blatt. Blatt, who posted a 53-29 record with the team last year, lasted just a season and a half in Cleveland.ESPN’s Brian Windhorst added that there’s been “unrest” in Cleveland’s locker room.Cleveland has fired coach David Blatt, sources tell Yahoo.— Adrian Wojnarowski (@WojVerticalNBA) January 22, 2016The Cavs have fired coach David Blatt, sources confirm. First reported by Yahoo— Brian Windhorst (@WindhorstESPN) January 22, 2016Despite positive comments publicly, there had been unrest growing in Cavs locker room. Frankly, it had been there since almost day one.— Brian Windhorst (@WindhorstESPN) January 22, 2016Despite up and downs, Blatt has had one ardent supporter in Cavs organization and that was owner Dan Gilbert.— Brian Windhorst (@WindhorstESPN) January 22, 2016LeBron James was informed of the decision to fire David Blatt today, he was not consulted on decision sources said— Brian Windhorst (@WindhorstESPN) January 22, 2016James’ fondness for Ty Lue and his desire to be coached by a former player were well known in the organization. As were issues with Blatt— Brian Windhorst (@WindhorstESPN) January 22, 2016Blatt, who came over from Maccabi Tel Aviv ahead of the 2014-2015 season, posted a regular season record of 83-40 in his time in Cleveland.last_img read more

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COSCO Announces Three New Contracts

first_imgzoom COSCO Corporation (Singapore) has released three announcements regarding the contracts awarded to its shipbuilding subsidiary.The Board of Directors of COSCO Corporation announced that the second contract awarded to COSCO (Nantong) Shipyard for the conversion of one semi-completed hull to high end floating accommodation unit, valued at over USD 170 million, is declared effective. The unit is scheduled for delivery in 24 months.In the second announcement COSCO said that COSCO (Dalian) Shipyard has secured a contract valued over USD 180 million from an Asian company to build one jack-up drilling rig. The rig is scheduled for delivery in the 3rd quarter of 2015.Furthermore, COSCO (Dalian) Shipyard has won a contract valued over RMB325 million (USD 53.2 million) from a Chinese buyer to build one 30,000 DWT cargo and training ship. The ship is scheduled for delivery in the third quarter of 2015. My location 此页面无法正确加载 Google 地图。您是否拥有此网站?确定 World Maritime News Staff, October 17, 2013; Image: COSCO Print  Closelast_img read more

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Drunken Captain Fined in New Zealand

first_imgNew Zealand has fined the captain of the 30,700 dwt containership Shansi NZD 3,000 (USD 2,200) for exceeding the alcohol limit for a seafarer.The 53-year-old Anthony Michael Baker, from Devon in the United Kingdom, was reported to Maritime New Zealand on August 4 for sailing the vessel while he was under the influence of alcohol.According to the pilots who were aboard the ship at the time, the captain appeared to be intoxicated and was having trouble docking the vessel.Whangarei Police breath tested the ship’s captain, who blew a test of 1,345 micrograms. The Maritime Transport Act limit is 250 micrograms of alcohol per litre of breath.“The master is legally responsible for their ship and all on board, and must be able to carry out their duties safely,” Neil Rowarth, Maritime New Zealand’s Northern Regional Manager, said.“Alcohol impairs judgment and increases the risk of accidents. Where we find seafarers over the limit, we will take action,” Rowarth added.last_img read more

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Norden Bolsters Middle East Presence with New Contract

first_imgzoomImage Courtesy: Norden Danish shipping company Norden has signed a three-year contract of affreightment (COA) with Qatari chemical firm Qatar Vinyl Company, a subsidiary of Qatar Petrochemical Company.Scheduled to commence in the second quarter of 2019, the agreement is for the shipment of salt from West Coast India to Qatar, where the salt will be used for chemical production.As informed, the contract entails shipment of approximately 500,000 tons annually of salt during the contract period. The transports will be carried out about once a month on Supramax vessels.Norden said that with the new contract it would be able to further optimize the logistical planning while expanding its activities in the Middle East.“The contract increases our flow of tonnage into the Arabian Gulf, which allows us to further grow our activities in the region, in line with our continued growth plans,” Jan Rindbo, Norden CEO, commented.According to Norden, long-running cargo contracts are vital for further growth within its dry cargo business and in line with the company growth strategy.“With the agreement, we are growing our presence in the Middle Eastern region, enabling us to position vessels across the load and discharge port regions, where they can be deployed to fulfill other contracts,” Adam Nielsen, Head of Industrial Bulk responsible for the COA business within dry cargo business in Norden, explained.Norden operates 249 dry cargo and 60 tanker vessels, with some units owned and others chartered. In addition, the company has a total of six ships on order, data on Norden’s website shows.last_img read more

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Province to Host Second Silver Economy Summit

first_imgThe province is hosting the second Silver Economy Summit, focusing on how older Nova Scotians can contribute to the workforce, community and volunteer needs. International and local experts will also discuss how businesses can market and develop new products, and governments can adapt services, to meet seniors’ needs and interests. The summit will be held in Halifax from May 22 to 24. “People are living longer and can contribute so much to their communities, their families and our workforce with the right opportunities and support,” said Seniors Minister Denise Peterson-Rafuse. “If we open more doors for seniors, that benefits everyone — businesses and communities who need their talent and experience, and older Nova Scotians who want to continue living productively and independently for as long as possible.” Nova Scotia has the oldest population of any province in Canada. Each month, about 1,000 people turn 65 years old in the province. “This creates a growing market for Nova Scotia businesses and requires governments to change how they deliver services,” Ms. Peterson-Rafuse said. International experts in business, non-profit, academic and public sectors will host discussions and workshops on several topics that challenge perceptions about aging. “Our business is all about making the connection between the experience seniors have, and the expertise businesses need,” said Rick Emberley, CEO of BoomersWork. “The Silver Economy Summit gives us the venue to explore new ways to maximize this potential with employers, while giving seasoned workers the flexible options they want.” Paula Fitzsimons, one of a number of keynote speakers, will follow up on her session at the first summit in 2010 speaking about developing and implementing public policy around senior entrepreneurship in the European Union. “I am delighted to be returning to Nova Scotia,” said Ms. Fitzsimons. “The second summit is shaping up to be another great event, and I am looking forward to listening and learning from the other speakers and participants.” To register, or for more information, visit www.silvereconomysummit.ca/. The province continues to make life better and more affordable for seniors and their families by supporting seniors’ efforts to live independently, while working collaboratively with communities to create places where Nova Scotians can live and age well.last_img read more

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Need for harsher drunk driving sentences in Labrador MADD

first_imgAPTN National NewsDrunk driving is a major problem in Labrador.Every week a dozen or more impaired driving cases cycle through the courts, but not everyone is happy with the severity of sentences.APTN’s Ossie Michelin has this story.last_img

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TMC forms cell to win over Hindispeaking voters

first_imgKolkata: The Trinamool Congress has formed a cell to win the votes of the Hindi-speaking people in the state. A sizeable number of Hindi-speaking people in the state may potentially be BJP voters.In a calculated move to create a dent in the BJP’s vote bank, the Trinamool Congress has constituted the cell, which will convince people and turn their votes in Trinamool Congress’s favour. Former Trinamool Congress MLA Dinesh Bajaj has been made the chief advisor of the newly constituted Hindi cell. It was learnt that the new committee is going to organise an outreach programme ahead of the Lok Sabha elections. Also Read – Centuries-old Durga Pujas continue to be hit among revellersChief Minister Mamata Banerjee may attend the Holi function and Kavi Sammelan of Marwaris in the Nazrul Mancha on Tuesday. Earlier, Banerjee addressed the conferences of Hindi-speaking people on various occasions. It was learnt that the Chief Minister may read out some of her poems when she will attend the Kavi Sammelan. Mayor Firhad Hakim and some other party leaders may also attend the programme. Some people however are not ready to accept it as a move by Trinamool Congress’ to win votes. They said the Chief Minister Banerjee attend all the programmes organised by various community in the city. “Our Chief Minister has already won the hearts of various communities in the state through her works,” a senior Trinamool Congress leader said. The members of the Hindi cell committee have started sending out invitations to community members after the Chief Minister had reportedly agreed to attend the programme.last_img read more

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Green court raps officials over action plan on noise pollution

first_imgNew Delhi: The National Green Tribunal has rapped the police and the district adminstration over their action plan to check noise pollution in West Delhi and termed the ATR as “inaction report”.A bench headed by NGT Chairperson Justice Adarsh Kumar Goel said the DCP and the SDM are merely avoiding the responsibility and shifting the burden to the Delhi Pollution Control Committee (DPCC) or others. DCP Deepak Purohit and SDM Nitin Jindal, who were present at NGT, informed the tribunal in their action report that an exclusive website and a helpline were being be developed by DPCC. Also Read – After eight years, businessman arrested for kidnap & murderIt had also been asked to undertake programme of awareness and a separate head has been created for the calls relating to noise pollution. “We find that the action taken report (ATR) is in fact ‘Inaction Report. The DCP and the SDM need to be trained for the job for which they have been appointed. They are merely avoiding the responsibility and shifting the burden to the DPCC or others. It is difficult to accept that only DPCC can create awareness or that only DPCC can create website and DCP and SDM are unfit for the job,” the bench said. The green panel directed the chief secretary and the Police Commissioner to monitor the situation and file a report within a month by e-mail. It also directed the DCP and SDM to take steps for starting the website within a month and furnish a compliance report.last_img read more

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Warden who fixed roof of church targeted by lead thieves ends up

Supporters also argued that the decision had been taken by the PCC, or parochial church council, as a whole.The Chancellor said the new roof, which could last for 40 years, could remain as it would be “wasteful” to remove it, but said it “should be inspected and maintained during that period with the greatest care, to avoid the possibility (or ultimately likelihood) that it will start leaking”.  All Saints Church, Pickwell, Leicestershire, England He ordered that Mr Watts should pay the costs of the court proceedings and “may not take a contribution or indemnity from the PCC or from any other church funds. “If he is right in his contention that he was supported thoroughly by the PCC, then the individual members of the PCC are at liberty to make their own voluntary contributions towards his debt,” he said. Advice from heritage groups says that churches who have lead roofs stolen are ideally meant to replace it with the same material, but may also use terne-coated stainless steel.  Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. All Saints Church, Pickwell, Leicestershire, EnglandCredit:Colin Underhill/Alamy Stock Photo Churchwardens established that replacing the lead roof would cost £12,840 plus architect’s fees, compared with the £7,760 cost of using “composite material”. Mr Watts received backing from area dean the Reverend Peter Hooper, who said he was “more than happy” with the replacement roof, though added that he could not condone the decision to install it without permission.  A church warden who fixed the roof after lead was stolen ended up in court because he did not have permission. Martin Watts decided to install plastic in the roof of All Saints Pickwell, in the diocese of Leicester, after thousands of pounds worth of damage was done by thieves who stole part of the roof of the medieval church in September 2016. But Mr Watts failed to apply for the consistory court’s permission, known as a faculty, to let the work go ahead. Mark Blackett-Ord, the chancellor of the diocese, said Mr Watts was the “driving force” behind the decision to install Sarnafil, a roofing membrane made of plastic and other materials, without permission. Now a church court has ruled that he must pay the costs of the hearing after heritage groups said the new roof was “visually objectionable”. The Grade I church dates from the 13th and 14th century and is of “outstanding architectural quality”, the chancellor said.  read more

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Churches no longer legally required to hold service every Sunday as Synod

Admitting that weekly service “is a centuries old tradition”, Rev Broadbent said: “What we have been saying is that this canon does not work, it is out of date and we are operating differently in the countryside now.  Churches will no longer be legally required to conduct a service every Sunday after the General Synod has voted to end a law that has existed since the 17th century. Canon laws, first passed in 1603 and updated most recently in 1964, stipulate that weekly Sunday services must take place in every church.However vicars in rural parts of the country, who have been increasingly responsible for “up to 20 churches” in their area due to the decline in clergy, say they are unable to abide by the law and left with little choice but to break it.In recent years growing numbers of parishes have held one combined Sunday worship where previously each church would have held separate services.Whilst no vicar has been punished for breaking the canon, Thursday’s changes mean that they can now conduct a single Sunday service for several congregations without having to seek written permission.The Bishop of Willesden, the Rt Rev Pete Broadbent, who first suggested the changes three years ago, said it “clears the way for people to be honest.” “It cuts out the bureaucracy. “This change merely reflects what has been practised for the past 20 years.”The two laws that were amended include Canon B11, which requires morning and evening prayer to be “said or sung audibly in every parish church every Sunday”. This has now been amended to “in at least one church” in every group.The second clause, known as Canon B14, previously required Holy Communion to be celebrated “in every parish church”. However, this has been substituted for “in at least one church in each benefice”. The number of multi parish benefices – defined as a group of churches that are looked after by one priest – have grown significantly in the UK in the past 50 years. According to figures from the Church of England’s Growth Research Programme, only 17 per cent of their parishes were in multi parish benefices in 1960. By 2011 this figure had risen to 71 per cent – meaning 8,400 of the Church’s 12,500 parishes are now amalgamated. “As the number of church attendees and stipendiary clergy has decreased over recent decades, parishes have been amalgamated to form multi-parish benefices,” the report stated in 2011. In 2017, it was reported that the Church is increasingly turning to “self supporting priests” with weekday jobs such as doctors, writers, teachers, plumbers or farmers. Accounting for one in six clergy, the number of self-supporting priests increased from 2,091 in 2002 to 3,230 in 2016. The Bishop of Willesden Peter Broadbent The Bishop of Willesden Peter BroadbentCredit:John Cobb If a member of the clergy is believed to have deliberately broken the protocol, they would be made to face a disciplinary panel under the Clergy Discipline Measure that was passed in 2003. However, the Church is not aware of this ever happening.Thursday’s amendments were voted through almost unanimously by 20 Bishops, 92 Clergy and 118 Laity, with only two voting against the motion. The Bishop of Salisbury, Nicholas Holtam, who governs a very rural patch, said: “Morning and Evening Prayer are the heartbeat of a church’s life.“This change is a sensible step which matches resources to reality and gives encouragement to clergy and laity to hold services in one of the churches in a benefice each day.“This will be much appreciated in rural areas where multi-parish benefices are a reality.”A Church of England Spokesperson said: “Sunday worship continues to be central to the Church of England’s ministry. The recent adaptation is designed to make it easier for multi-church parishes who rotate services between a group of churches.“This is often already the case in rural parishes where it is impractical to hold weekly services in every church. This reflects the movement over the past two hundred years of people from the country to cities. According to members of the Synod, the traditional canon law stipulating that weekly services must take place has been regularly broken by priests over the past several decades.  Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

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Grenada criminalises the use of electronic devices at polling booths

(CMC) — The Grenada Parliament today approved an amendment to the People’s Representation legislation that will, among other things, criminalise going into a polling booth on any polling day with any electronic devices, with special emphasis on cellular phones and digital cameras.“No person shall have in his or her possession any electronic device upon entering a polling booth to cast his or her ballot on polling day,” said the amendment to the Representation of the People’s legislation.It recommended that “a person who has an electronic device in his or her possession shall upon entering the polling station on polling day, hand over the electronic device to the returning officer or his or her designate.Anyone violating the law is liable on summary conviction to a fine of EC$5,000 (One EC dollar=US$0.37 cents) or to a term of imprisonment for six months.Leader of Government Business, Gregory Bowen, said the legislation also increases the deposit fee from EC$300 to EC$500 for any person nominated to contest a general election.Government legislator, Anthony Boatswain said that the fee should have been increased to EC$1,000 adding: “I believe we should look at a high quantum, we need to show the seriousness about this exercise”.The amendment, which was approved in a special sitting of the House, also provides for candidates to vote in a constituency where he or she is not registered but is a candidate on the ballot paper.Bowen said that sometimes a candidate contesting a particular constituency may be registered in another constituency and the amendment is to give the person the opportunity to vote where they are contesting.“However, it must be done within the guidelines of the law,” he added.The legislation notes that a person who has been nominated and who intends to vote in a constituency other than the constituency in which his or her name appears on the official list of electors shall complete the necessary documents and return them to the supervisor of elections at least seven days before the election.The legislation must now be approved by the Senate before becoming law.Grenadians will vote in a national referendum on November 6 to determine whether or not to replace the London-based Privy Council with the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ) as the island’s final court. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedGECOM working to ensure persons with disability vote with ease on Election DayJanuary 9, 2015In “Politics”PPP/C GECOM Commissioners speak out about ‘irregularities’May 24, 2015In “Politics”PPP concerned with GECOM’s haste in hiring, training Polling Day staffNovember 3, 2014In “Politics” read more

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Atlas Copco launches Boomer T1 D drill jumbo for challenges of narrowvein

first_imgAtlas Copco has introduced a new face drilling rig for narrow drifts . Based on its well-proven predecessor, the Boomer 104, the new Boomer T1 D offers an impressive array of technical and environmental improvements. Similarly, Atlas Copco associate, Aramine has a new range of narrow vein machines, described in the October issue of International Mining. Narrow drifts or tunnels call for a small and flexible face drilling rig. Since the 1990s, Atlas Copco has filled this role with the Boomer 104. Now Atlas Copco has launched its successor – the Boomer T1 D. This retains the features and capabilities of the well-liked Boomer 104, but now introduces an extensive range of improvements and upgrades, all aimed at improving productivity, safety and operator comfort.The improvements and options include a more powerful and cleaner Tier 3 engine for higher tramming speed and environmental benefits. The boom suspension system reduces stress on the machine, thereby increasing service life and improving operator comfort when driving. A more ergonomic and comfortable cabin with better visibility is an optional extra, and the serviceability has been improved with more accessible service points.The new carrier frame is stronger, has a lower centre of gravity and has an oversized articulation to cope with demanding operating conditions.The first Boomer T1 D was tested at the Lovisa lead/zinc mine in Sweden where it achieved good results compared to the mine’s previous Boomer 104. Operators of the machine praised the improved ergonomics and drilling performance during the trial, Atlas Copco says.last_img read more

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Nutsy said I dont think Luque will be travelling Real Madrid put

first_img Shelbourne’s Joseph Ndo and Owen Heary with Albert Luque of Deportivo during a Champions League qualifier at Lansdowne Road in 2004. Image: INPHO Short URL Follow us: the42.ie ‘Nutsy said: I don’t think Luque will be travelling – Real Madrid put in an £18m bid for him’ Owen Heary chats to The42 about facing Deportivo in the Champions League and his career in the League of Ireland. 5 Comments http://the42.ie/3359533 Shelbourne’s Joseph Ndo and Owen Heary with Albert Luque of Deportivo during a Champions League qualifier at Lansdowne Road in 2004. Share Tweet Email1 MORE GIFTED PLAYERS may have graced the League of Ireland, but when it comes to drive and winning mentality, it is difficult to think of a player superior to Owen Heary down through the years.Beside words like ‘solid,’ ‘reliable’ and ‘leader’ in the dictionary, there may as well be pictures of Heary.Former Cork and St Pat’s boss Pat Dolan went so far as to describe him as the League of Ireland’s equivalent of Kilkenny GAA legend Henry Shefflin.The numerous accolades that Heary earned over the course of a stellar career certainly back up the hype — they include seven League of Ireland titles and two FAI Cups.The Shelbourne legend’s love of football was cultivated from an early age in his native Cabra.“In the estate we had a five-a-side tarmac pitch and we’d be constantly playing football on that every night for hours until the lights went off or you were called in,” Heary tells The42.Back then, all the lads around the estate wanted to be footballers. You’d have your Liverpool fans, your Man United fans, you’d have your road against the other road.“You’d have teams battling against each other, the games would go on, they could be (level at) 10-10, it could be next goal the winner, it would then be 11-10 but they’d just keep going.It was great and the ambition was always to become a footballer later on in life, possibly in England or Ireland.”Heary started off playing organised football for his local side in Cabra when he was “nine or 10″. His friend’s father managed the team.It was also part of a rigorous routine that the football-mad youngster embraced wholeheartedly.You hear people saying players are ‘overloaded’ now,” Heary says. “Years ago, you’d be out playing six, seven hours football a day and then going training that night.“Then (there was) a match — you’d play two or three games in a weekend, and no one was ever talking about ‘overloading’ players.That’s why you say to yourself: ‘How has it come down to coaching now more than natural ability?’ The street footballer is sort of gone.”Heary spent a year playing for Rivermount and was not yet renowned as a tough-tackling full-back.Because I had a bit of pace, they played me up front and with the school team it was the same,” he says.Aside from that one season, he “never really played schoolboy against the Home Farms and the Belvos”.Instead, Heary joined his father’s team while still in his early teens.I was playing in the Phoenix Park against men, which probably stood to me better,” he recalls. “Playing against big physical lads is a lot different to playing against schoolboys.“The one thing was I was able to run and they couldn’t catch me, so that was the good part of it.” Heary cites former Shelbourne manager Dermot Keely as one of the biggest influences on his career. Source: Donall Farmer/INPHOMoving to join a club in England was never really an option to Heary growing up, though “once or twice” there were offers on the table when he had become a senior player.I remember Dermot Keely saying to me: ‘Do you want to go to England or stay here at Shels and sign a new contract?’ At the time, I was quite happy to stay at Shels, because we’d just won a trophy.“There was another time where I signed a contract for him too. My son had just been born and it just wasn’t the right time for me to move over.Straight after the tribunal (with Shelbourne) finished I signed for Bohs (in January 2007) and Ollie (Byrne) comes to me and says: ‘I’m going to sell you to QPR next week.’ I said: ‘It’s a bit late, I’ve already signed for Bohs, you could have done that months ago, rather than bring me to a tribunal.’“There were a few options (to go abroad) there, but it’s something that I never regret, because I was always enjoying my football and that was the crucial thing.”One positive aspect of staying in Ireland was the fact that he broke into senior football far quicker than almost any youngster playing in England would have managed.Heary was just 16 when he made his debut for Kilkenny City against Bray Wanderers in November 1993. In this challenging and uncompromising environment, the teenager held his own, though he admits it was quite the baptism of fire.I remember going down, myself and another lad from the estate, (I was told to) wear a shirt, tie and trousers. I was only 16 years of age, I didn’t have that, so I had to go down in my Da’s (shirt), it was hanging off me.“I went down on a mini-bus to watch the Kilkenny first team play Cardiff. Kilkenny beat them 3-2. At the time I was saying ‘this looks good’. I was in the dressing room for one or two of the games and Jimmy Donnelly was sitting beside me. He’d taken his (false) teeth out, put them on the side and was putting in a gumshield.I remember looking around and thinking: ‘My god, these are men that are going out looking for a war more than anything else.’ It was definitely an eye opener with the tackles and the elbows coming in.“I played a game where I came on as a sub, the ball was coming to me, I sort of ducked (out of a challenge). I remember Johnny Reynor saying to me: ‘If you keep doing that (you won’t last long).’That’s when you knew you were in a man’s team, you had to step up or you’d be moved on.”Heary impressed to the extent that he played 16 times during a season spent at the club, though not everyone was overly enamoured with the promising young footballer.I know one or two of the players who were there at the time saw a 16-year-old taking a senior pro’s position — I remember (one player in particular) wasn’t too happy.“But with the rest of the lads, I was encouraged by them pushing me on. It was a good experience.” Heary made over 100 appearances for Home Farm between 1994 and 1998. Source: © INPHOHeary’s brief spell at Kilkenny ended in 1994, when Liam Tuohy persuaded him to join Home Farm.Kilkenny let all the Dublin lads go and I was the only one asked to stay. I had no way of getting up and down (to games), so Home Farm was the best option for me then.“It was a good experience. I was training there doing a FÁS course during the day and then (football) training at night.It was like a full time set-up for me, you had Stephen McGuinness there, Martin Daly, who became manager as well. It was a learning curve.“It was a good pitch, and I was playing week in week out. The managers from the Premier Division clubs would come down and watch, because we’d be playing on the Sunday. It was a good stage to show off the talents that you had.”After four years and over 100 appearances for Home Farm, Heary was ready to play at a higher level. The defender had impressed to the extent that, in 1998, he earned a move to Shelbourne, who were one of the best sides in the country at the time.I remember Dermot (Keely) actually asked me to sign for Finn Harps when he was manager there when I was at Home Farm. I didn’t go, it was too far.“Then he became manager of Home Farm, and I thought, that’s it, I’m going to be out on my ear here. But he was great, he actually showed me how to defend. He played me as an outside right for Home Farm.When he went to Shels, he didn’t take me at the start. He took Stephen Gifford at right full. Two or three weeks later, he said: ‘Look Owen, would you be interested in coming down? I want you to put pressure on Dessie Baker as an outside right.’ I said ‘no problem,’ I agreed and signed for him.”Heary joined Shelbourne on the back of one of their most memorable and ultimately anti-climactic seasons. Having looked in strong contention for the treble, the season ended in bitterly disappointing circumstances. They lost the league to St Pat’s by a single point and went down to Cork City 1-0 after a closely fought FAI Cup final was replayed. Source: retroloi/YouTubeThe young Dubliner’s arrival coincided with a downturn in the team’s fortunes. Though they finished third, just one place worse off than the previous campaign, league winners St Pat’s finished a full 26 points ahead of them.As a result of this loss of form, Heary was among those whose very presence at the club was questioned. A lesser player might have wilted in these circumstances, yet the youngster stood up for himself.Things didn’t go well at the start,” he recalls. “They were losing a lot of games. I remember Pat Fenlon stepping up when we had a players’ meeting.“He said: ‘You Home Farm lads aren’t good enough to be here.’ I was the only one playing at the time and I answered him back saying we hadn’t had a chance to impress and to show what we could do. To cut a long story short, the other lads were released and I eventually got in (to the team on a regular basis). Nine years later, I was still there.”It was an exceptionally talented side by League of Ireland standards. The Shelbourne team of that era included Tony Sheridan, Greg Costello, Mick Neville, Tommy McCarthy, Pat Scully, Declan Geoghegan, Stephen Geoghegan, Pat Fenlon, Dessie Baker, Richie Baker and Steve Williams.But big changes were on the way. The gifted Sheridan, who had previously shown great promise for Coventry City and had even been linked with a move to Liverpool during the Graeme Souness era, was ruthlessly cast aside and allowed to join Portadown ahead of the 1999-2000 campaign.Paul Doolin, who was by then a veteran in his mid-30s, joined the club. Heary cites his influence on proceedings as crucial to the club’s subsequent success in winning the league and cup double. As well as improving the team immeasurably, the future Ireland underage boss had a significant impact on Heary personally, and helped cultivate the winning mentality that the defender ultimately became irrevocably associated with.It wasn’t until we brought in Paul Doolin that we really kicked on the following (1999-2000) season. He brought in that experience and drive. Paul said to me: ‘You had a good season this year, but can you better it next year?’ That was always the drive then.“I used to talk to Doolin and to Mick Neville and you’d see that they had six league titles. That was the ambition then to say: ‘Hopefully I can get one or two.’ And then as I got closer (to their records), there was a drive to overtake them.”While older players such as Doolin didn’t stick around for long, Shelbourne would still dominate the League of Ireland for years in a manner similar to the way Dundalk have managed in recent seasons, notwithstanding the latter’s poor form lately.Between 1999 and 2006, Heary and his teammates won a phenomenal five league titles. The defender acknowledges that he played the best football of his career at Tolka Park, gaining recognition from his peers as he was rewarded with the PFAI Players’ Player of the Year accolade amid the culmination of the 2000-01 campaign. Wes Hoolahan of Shels and Drogheda’s Lee Jones in 2003. Source: INPHOThe emergence of new young players was also key to Shels’ continued success, and one of these individuals in question went by the name of Wes Hoolahan. Joining as a teenager, he would spend four years with the League of Ireland side before eventually going on to star with Norwich in the Premier League and the Irish team at international level.When he came in he was a young player,” Heary remembers. “We were all young, but he was 18 or something like that. You could see that talent that he had. David Crawley once said that myself and himself used to take turns trying to kick him (in training), but we couldn’t catch him.“He was a great street footballer. He was able to keep the ball close to him, he was able to beat you. He had a bit of pace. People didn’t think he had pace, but he did. As for the physical attributes, his upper body was strong.I was more surprised with the fact that he went to Scotland (joining Livingstone) before he went to England. If you look at him when he played against Deportivo in the European games, he was just built for that stage. He could keep the ball, he could pass the ball, he always wanted the ball under pressure.“You could see the ability that he had. He should have been playing at a higher level a lot earlier than he did.”The aforementioned Deportivo matches are still remembered fondly to this day, more than 13 years later. The Spanish side were at the time widely regarded as one of the best teams in Europe. Just a couple of months previously, they had reached the Champions League semi-finals — bowing out after a narrow 1-0 aggregate loss to the eventual winners: a Jose Mourinho-managed Porto outfit.Pat Fenlon’s men were well prepared for the match, however, having earned hard-fought victories over Icelandic side KR and Hadjuk Split of Croatia in previous qualifying rounds.The Deportivo game was a different level altogether,” Heary recalls. “You’re talking about top, top players. In the build-up to it, Nutsy (Pat Fenlon) said: ‘I don’t think (Albert) Luque will be travelling — Real Madrid put in an £18m bid for him.’ That just sums up the whole thing, that Real Madrid are looking to buy a player off Deportivo.“Then Pat goes to me ‘he’s on the travel list, so he’ll definitely be playing’. That’s when the nerves are kicking in and you’re thinking about it. But what an experience for us and for everyone involved in it. Even for (non-Shebourne supporters) that just followed the league, it was a great experience for them.” By Paul Fennessy 36,358 Views Source: retroloi/YouTubeShelbourne ultimately emerged from the two games with great credit, despite having nowhere near the type of resources that Deportivo benefited from. They managed to earn a 0-0 draw against the Spanish side at Lansdowne Road, while the 3-0 result in the second leg was harsh on the Irish team, who had seriously tested their more esteemed opponents. Source: barbarian981/YouTubeHad their feat come in more modern times, they would have qualified for the Europa League group stages and enjoyed a substantial financial windfall similar to what Dundalk accrued in the wake of their European heroics last year. Source: LewisQ/YouTubeInstead, the League of Ireland’s reigning champions were subsequently dumped out of the Uefa Cup, losing 4-2 on aggregate to a talented Lille side. But again, Shels had performed admirably, drawing the first leg 2-2 in Dublin against the French team, whose line-up included internationals such as Tony Sylva, who had starred for Senegal in the World Cup two years previously, and ex-Tottenham player Milenko Acimovic, while a teenage Kevin Mirallas — now of Everton — was on the bench.By this point, Heary was captaining the side and was an invaluable asset to the club both on and off the pitch, having been tasked with the responsibility of controlling the dressing room.“I had to learn from the likes of Nutsy and Doolin,” he says.You had to deal with the chairman, the board. And in terms of controlling the dressing room, there’s a lot of problems that go on in dressing rooms that players have. The last thing you need to be doing is giving them to the manager. We didn’t need to be going to the manager with every problem.“We’d have games where we were getting beaten at half-time and all of a sudden, there’d be a row. Matches in training could be the same. If there are certain things to be sorted out, the players can do it ourselves, shake hands and get on with it. You just make sure that every player is at it and no one is stepping out of line.”This system worked well, with Heary a much-admired figure who led the club to success after success during that era. Then, suddenly, it all came to an end.Incredibly, two years after Shels had given one of the best sides in Europe a serious scare, they were in financial turmoil. The players went months without being paid and miraculously still managed to pip Derry City to the 2006 league title amid this backdrop of uncertainty.Owing to the club’s financial improprieties, several of Shels’ top players including Heary were made free agents, and the team were relegated to the First Division. Ever since, they have never fully recovered and the Dublin side are no longer the force they once were in Irish football. Shelbourne’s Owen Heary, Sean Dillon, FAI Chief Executive John Delaney and Fran Gavin (PFAI Chief Executive) with a players contract in 2006. Source: Morgan Treacy/INPHOHeary subsequently joined Bohs in January 2007. Under normal circumstances, even a player of his legendary standing might have expected flak from Shels supporters after joining another Dublin club. But given how shoddily the experienced defender and his teammates had been treated by their previous club, few could complain about his decision.Our fans totally understood it and there was never a bad word said to me about it,” he adds. “The fact is it was down the road and I supported them as a young lad growing up, so it made sense to go there.”Sean Connor, currently serving a six-month prison sentence for driving without a license, was manager at the time, and Heary was not impressed with how the club was being run upon his arrival there, describing how a lack of “professionalism” was hampering the team’s progress.The first season didn’t go well,” he explains. “We finished third. We had a very good team at the time but needed a bit more to put us in the right direction.“We were a full-time team but we weren’t training as a full-time team.We’d be due to go training, then all of a sudden training would be cancelled. There were little things that were going on that were hard to fathom when you were trying to get yourself ready for games.”The following season, however, the situation changed for the better. Pat Fenlon took over as manager and the club consequently won the league by a record 19 points. In total, they lost just two and won 27 of their 33 games, all of which was achieved with virtually the same side as the year before.It shows that we did have a good team, we did have a good set-up. We just needed someone to be more professional and bring us in the right direction.“It’s an achievement that really stands up there with them. (The goalkeeper who now plays for Cardiff) Brian Murphy should have won Player of the Year that year. We won the league by 19 points and we didn’t have a player that won Player of the Year. It was a strange one.“But for us as players, it was a great feeling. The fact that I went to Bohs to win trophies and I managed to win the league in my second season there (was great).” Heary and teammates celebrate winning the league. Source: Donall Farmer/INPHOHeary and his teammates would go on to emulate this feat the following season, this time winning it ahead of second-place Shamrock Rovers by four points.Nevertheless, neither the club nor the player have tasted silverware since, losing out to Rovers on goal difference in 2010. And sadly, there was a degree of deja vu for Heary ultimately, as Bohs like Shels before them began to suffer serious financial problems.A number of their top players left for England and elsewhere, but Heary admirably chose to stay and revert to how he had started out in football — playing as an amateur.The last thing I wanted was for Bohs to go down or be relegated or something like that,” he explains. “I was given offers to go to other clubs. I thought: ‘If I go part-time here, I can stay with the club and still work for the club in other areas off the field and help promote it.’ For me, it was a no-brainer.“I know the money was great and it would be great earning a few more quid. But I didn’t want that. I wanted to help Bohs and give them as much time as I could to stay on the pitch and keep playing. I was captain of the club so (it was a matter of pride for me as well ).”Heary would spend a further three years at the club before announcing his retirement at the age of 37, having agreed to replace Aaron Callaghan, taking over as caretaker manager. Derry City’s James McClean wheels away after scoring against Galway in 2009. Source: Margaret McLaughlin/INPHOComing up against one outstanding player in particular made the difficult decision to hang up his boots that little bit easier.In terms of players, there’s been a few good ones (I’ve faced) throughout the years. I was thinking the other day when I was coming towards the end of my career, (James) McClean, he was only starting out (with Derry) and he was flying at the time. We played him in Dalymount and he was a rocket. I don’t know whether it was me coming to the end that I was that slow or the fact that he was so quick, but he was the toughest I played towards the end of my career definitely.“He reminded me of Roy O’Donovan at Cork. He was a similar player: loved a tackle, good pace, a tough opponent and you knew you were in a game — he gave as good as he got.”With the FAI rejecting calls to give Heary a testimonial on account of his amateur status at the time, Bohs arranged a tribute match for the veteran defender instead as he bowed out of football as a player.While many footballers in the League of Ireland and elsewhere tend to be somewhat caught off guard by the end of their playing career and find themselves unprepared for life thereafter, Heary was able to make a smooth transition into coaching.I speak to players who, once they retire, depression kicks in and things like that,” he says. “I was coaching the reserves (at Bohs), managing the reserves, the 19s. I kept doing my (coaching) badges and kept learning. It was the one thing I wanted to do — to stay in football after I finished playing.“Unfortunately, I finished earlier than I possibly should have. I was 37 but I had a chance to manage Bohs. I didn’t think you could (play and manage).”Having served as caretaker at Bohs, Heary then took charge of Sligo Rovers ahead of 2015 season.At Bohs, I had been at the club so long that I knew the players who were there. I knew the mentality of the players we had in the dressing room. I had a chance of full-time football up in Sligo. So I definitely wanted to take it.“My eyes were opened, because I was going into an unknown area. I didn’t have my staff with me. My family were (in Dublin). So going up, you’re trying to find out what the club is about. You find out what the players are about.”Yet this bold move into unfamiliar territory failed to pay dividends. By June 2015, less than a year after his appointment, Heary and Sligo parted ways, with news of his departure coming in bizarre circumstances. Source: eir Sport/YouTubeHeary initially had been told by the club that his services were no longer required only for him to be reinstated the following day. Sligo then released a statement confirming his sacking while Heary was in the middle of doing analysis as part of Setanta Ireland’s coverage of St Patrick’s Athletic’s 3-0 win over Longford Town, with the announcement leaving him utterly bewildered on live TV.Nonetheless, despite this embarrassing incident, Heary insists he holds no ill feeling towards the Bit o’ Red.It was just all up in the air,” he remembers. “The lads read out the statement on the telly. I was baffled by it. They never contacted me to say: ‘Owen, this is what we’re putting out, this is the way it is,’ or anything like it. They sort of caught me off guard a little bit.“But there are no grudges — it’s football, you move on. I see another manager is gone from them again (recently), so they’ve obviously gone through a lot over the last couple of years. I think they need to stick to a manager for a while and try to settle down.”Just days after his departure from the Showgrounds, Heary received an offer from Bray to become their manager, but turned it down as “my head was all over the place because of what happened at Sligo”.Instead, he gradually rediscovered the joys of coaching with local side Tolka Rovers and subsequently, the Shelbourne Ladies team.Eventually, last June, he got the offer to return to Shelbourne as manager of the men’s team. With the club third from bottom when he took over, there was little pressure on him to work instant miracles, and the Dublin side finished the campaign in the same position Heary found them.This season, there have been signs of gradual improvement, with the Heary’s team currently fifth in the First Division, eight points behind league leaders Cobh following their loss to them on Friday night.With only one team going up and some of their rivals having better resources, Heary admits promotion to the top flight this year is a “big ask,” but the optimist in him still believes it could happen.Look at the money Waterford invested, the money Longford invested, Cobh and UCD have settled teams that were just short of the playoff last year,” he says. “But one team has to win it and the pressure is on the team standing at the summit, so if you can stay there or thereabouts come the last few games of the season, then who knows? We’ve seen surprises over the last few years of (unfancied) teams doing so well — Leicester City being the prime example.”And while he remains as devoted to the game as ever, Heary currently has a job away from the toils of football management as well.“A mate of mine was involved in a delivery service and going back a while, he asked was there any chance I could drive a van for him. It was a big company.I said ‘yeah, I’ll give you a dig out,’ and I’ve been doing that for the last year and a bit, having originally been told they only needed me for a month. But it’s the usual, where one month leads to two.“We don’t train until six o’clock or seven o’clock in the evening, so it’s a chance to kill a bit of time during the day. I start about half five in the morning and finish at half two. It sort of suits me in a way, there’s no weekend work, it doesn’t interfere with the football, so I’m enjoying it.“I don’t have to go looking for time off or leave work early to head to training.We start early but we finish early. When I’m home, I can have dinner and I can relax before we go training. It’s a big plus to get a job like that.”Indeed, it’s hard to imagine the Shels icon’s life without football. For an individual with his ferocious drive to succeed, competing is less a choice and more a necessity.The42 is on Instagram! Tap the button below on your phone to follow us! Image: INPHO Apr 30th 2017, 9:31 PM Sunday 30 Apr 2017, 9:31 PM ‘I was 21 and doctors are saying you’re going to end up in a wheelchair if you continue to play’>‘To say I could have had a great career in England, that’s only b******s’> Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this articlelast_img read more

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Man gets 28 years to life for killing black teen from Vancouver

first_imgLarnell Bruce PORTLAND — A white supremacist who ran down and killed a young black man in Oregon two years ago was sentenced Tuesday in Multnomah County, Ore., Circuit Court to life in prison without the possibility of parole for 28 years.Russell Courtier’s sentencing came after jurors in March found Courtier, 40, guilty of murder, hit-and-run driving and the hate crime of second-degree intimidation in the death of 19-year-old Larnell Bruce Jr. of Vancouver, The Oregonian/OregonLive reported.Courtier and his then girlfriend, Colleen Hunt, were in a Jeep driven by Courtier on Aug. 10, 2016, when he was encouraged by Hunt to drive into Bruce after the two fought outside a 7-Eleven store in the Portland suburb of Gresham, authorities have said.Prosecutors argued Courtier was motivated by his white supremacist beliefs — saying he was a member of the European Kindred white supremacist prison gang and was wearing the gang’s logo on his baseball cap and had its tattoo on his leg when he encountered Bruce.Surveillance video showed Bruce standing outside the store, near the intersection of Southeast 188th Avenue and Southeast Burnside Street, when Courtier drove up and parked. A fight erupted, but it was not clear how it started, Senior Deputy District Attorney David Hannon said.last_img read more

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PDM budget to finance ideas from KPMG Tourism Report Two developments touted

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppTurks and Caicos, April 6, 2017 – Providenciales – Major Developments in tourism sector are expected to be rolled out in the coming months and will be in keeping with the recommendations put forward by the KPMG TCI Tourism Strategy Report completed and published since 2015.Tourism Minister Ralph Higgs showed obvious disdain for the former administration’s failure to implement any of the recommendations of the report.  Higgs said the PDM Administration is now ready to at least tackle the ‘low hanging fruit’ for transformation of the sector.  “For the first time since the introduction of the KPMG report, we have made funds available for the implementation of that report. So as soon as the budget is passed we will roll out a calendar of events carrying out the Change Document, consistent with the recommendations of the KPMG report”The minister in presenting the his ministry’s accomplishments in the PDM government’s First 100 days in office press conference, announced several projects on the cards including the Royal Reef Project, which is said to be in its final phases. The project is expected to benefit residents of North and Middle Caicos, whom the minister reminded were not forgotten by his administration.   Tourism is awaiting the sign off for the Royal Reef Project from investors and stakeholders, and he urged the developers to move quickly on their final plans.Royal Reef had been stalled and is expected to make a rebound and bring much needed employment opportunities to residents of the country’s two largest islands. Minister Higgs confirmed also that  approval was met for the development of a Boutique and Hotel in North Caicos.Meanwhile, plans include the creation of a future terminal in Sandy Point as discussed with the Ports Authority. It is expected that an Environment Impact Assessment will come first for the Sandy Point area. The minister says its aim is to quote “give relief to persons who use those channels for boating and shipping purposes” that there would be no negative environmental effect on the pristine waterway in North Caicos.Story by: Kimberly Ramkhalawan#MagneticMediaNews#twodevelopmentsforNorthCaicos#KPMGtourismreport Related Items:#KPMGtourismreport, #magneticmedianews, #twodevelopmentsforNorthCaicoslast_img read more

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GHMC seizes 6 pubs in Hyderabad

first_imgThe GHMC officials have raided several pubs and seized six pubs for not adhering to the prescribed fire safety norms and operating without trade licence, parking and others. Among these were also operated in residential colonies. As many as 12 bars are following the fire safety norms and has a trade license out of the total 48 pubs, said Khairatabad zone commissioner Ali Faruqui. They further said that the pubs that are not focussing on the norms will be seized. Also Read – Vemulawada school seized after road accident Advertise With Us “Most of the bars are falling shortfall of fire escape stairs, fire alarms and fire extinguishing equipment,” the official said. The six pubs seized were Le Vantage Cafe Bar, Farzi Cafe, Juri Cafe & Bar, Absorb — The Boutique Bar and TOT Nightclub in Jubilee Hills and Zehn On 10 in Banjara Hills. “The pubs which have not adhered to the safety norms were issued notices three months ago and those which did nothing even after the notices were seized,” the official added.last_img read more

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This Hyderabad school has produced stars like Satya Nadella

first_imgWhat is common among Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella, India’s permanent representative at the United Nations Syed Akbaruddin, Andhra Pradesh Chief Minister Y.S. Jagan Mohan Reddy and well-known cricket commentator Harsha Bhogle. They are all products of the same Hyderabad Public School. The premier educational institution of the city has churned out powerful corporate honchos like Mastercard President and CEO Ajay Banga, founder and CEO of Fairfax Financial Holding Prem Watsa and Adobe Systems CEO Shantanu Narayan besides Satya Nadella. Also Read – JIH organises Eid Milap for sanitary workers Advertise With Us With Syed Akbaruddin in news for leading India’s charge on Kashmir at the United Nations, the spotlight is on the distinguished alumni of Hyderabad Public School (HPS). “My Alma Mater-ever grateful 2 thee (sic.),” the leading diplomat tweeted after HPS said it was proud to recognize man of the moment.My Alma Mater-ever grateful 2 thee 🙏🏽 https://t.co/CYfp4ODh3F— Syed Akbaruddin (@AkbaruddinIndia) August 21, 2019 Also Read – GHMC distributes saplings to KV students Advertise With Us Syed Akbaruddin, who passed out from HPS in 1976, is the 1985-batch IFS officer and handled many key diplomatic assignments including the spokesperson of the ministry of foreign affairs. The HPS alumni rose to great heights of success and fame in different fields like business, politics, civil services, sports and films. Cobra beer founder and a member of UK Parliament Karan Billimoria, former Andhra Pradesh chief minister N. Kiran Kumar Reddy, All India Majlis-e-Ittehadul Muslimeen (AIMIM) chief and Hyderabad MP Asaduddin Owaisi, former cricketer Venkatpathy Raju and Telugu actors Akkineni Nagarjuna and Rana Daggubati are among the other alumni of 96-year-old school. Advertise With Us HPS managing committee member Marri Aditya Reddy told IANS that the institution was proud of its alumni excelling in various walks of life. He was all praise for Syed Akbaruddin for the way he is defending India at the United Nations. “Somebody who comes from Hyderabad and from simple upbringing is defending the nation. We are so proud of him. It speaks of the immense value system created at HPS over the decades,” said Aditya Reddy, grandson of former Andhra Pradesh Chief Minister Marri Channa Reddy. With its strong eco-system, HPS helped its pupils coming from modest background to become leaders in different fields. “This is what gives us excitement. Ordinary people were able to excel in personal and professional capacities. It was possible due to the value system created in the HPS atmosphere,” said Aditya Reddy, also an alumni of HPS. Inspired by famous Eton College of Britain, Mir Osman Ali Khan, the last Nizam of Hyderabad State founded the school in 1923. It was exclusively meant for the sons of the nobility. It was only in 1951 that the HPS opened its doors for public. Even after Independence and Hyderabad State’s merger with Indian Union, the school had the elitist tag as children of only powerful politicians, wealthy businessmen, IAS and IPS officers and celebrities used to get admission. The school started admitting girls in 1984. Aditya Reddy said when Channa Reddy was the chief minister he brought a balance in the running of the school by giving some control to the government by making principal secretary education the chairman of HPS board of governors. HPS, which started with six students in 1923, today has nearly 3,000 students. It is run by a society comprising eminent people from all walks of life. Its management committee has seven members while 35-member board looks after day to day affairs of the institution. Spread over 130 acres in Begumpet near the old airport in the heart of the city, HPS is said to have the largest campus than Vatican City. Its main building is a heritage structure while the campus has trekking routes, rock-formations, two cricket fields, athletic arena and several hockey, football grounds and a big library. Aditya Reddy said HPS shed the tag of elitist school long ago and it had been giving admissions to SCs, STs, BCs and minorities as per the government policy. “We have been maintaining the social and economic balance. There is no differentiation as we also admit children from under privileged sections of the society,” he said.last_img read more

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WATCH A Discussion on Immigration and the Texas Border

first_img Share Gary Polland and guest co-host Luis Elizondo-Thomson lead a discussion on the current status of the U.S. Immigration System. They are joined by guests Ruby Powers, Immigration Attorney and candidate for State Representative District 134 ; and Dr. Tony Payan, Director of the Mexico Center at Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy, as they analyze the issues within the immigration system and consider whether or not there is a “crisis” at the border. Original Air-date: May 17, 2019.last_img

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