UNP to push for elections in 2014

The UNP leader recalled that his party was ready to work with the government before the vote in Geneva and sign an agreement on national issues. “The UNP must get ready for an election in 2014. The government has tarnished the good image of the country and on the other side they have hit the people in their stomach. This regime is not leaving on its own,” he said. However he says the government disregarded the invitation from the UNP and in the process failed to put the country first.He says the government, instead, focused on the Mattala airport and not on more key issues including the implementation of the Lessons Learned and Reconciliation Commission (LLRC) recommendations. UNP leader Ranil Wickremesinghe says his party will push for an election in 2014 to remove the government from power.He says the government has failed to protect the country and so the time has now come to remove the government. Wickremesinghe also noted that while on one had the government was criticizing the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay, on the other side they were inviting her to visit Sri Lanka.He says there is no point on criticizing the UN Human Rights Council when the government had failed to do its part.  (Colombo Gazette)CLICK HERE FOR AUDIO read more

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Warden who fixed roof of church targeted by lead thieves ends up

Supporters also argued that the decision had been taken by the PCC, or parochial church council, as a whole.The Chancellor said the new roof, which could last for 40 years, could remain as it would be “wasteful” to remove it, but said it “should be inspected and maintained during that period with the greatest care, to avoid the possibility (or ultimately likelihood) that it will start leaking”.  All Saints Church, Pickwell, Leicestershire, England He ordered that Mr Watts should pay the costs of the court proceedings and “may not take a contribution or indemnity from the PCC or from any other church funds. “If he is right in his contention that he was supported thoroughly by the PCC, then the individual members of the PCC are at liberty to make their own voluntary contributions towards his debt,” he said. Advice from heritage groups says that churches who have lead roofs stolen are ideally meant to replace it with the same material, but may also use terne-coated stainless steel.  Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. All Saints Church, Pickwell, Leicestershire, EnglandCredit:Colin Underhill/Alamy Stock Photo Churchwardens established that replacing the lead roof would cost £12,840 plus architect’s fees, compared with the £7,760 cost of using “composite material”. Mr Watts received backing from area dean the Reverend Peter Hooper, who said he was “more than happy” with the replacement roof, though added that he could not condone the decision to install it without permission.  A church warden who fixed the roof after lead was stolen ended up in court because he did not have permission. Martin Watts decided to install plastic in the roof of All Saints Pickwell, in the diocese of Leicester, after thousands of pounds worth of damage was done by thieves who stole part of the roof of the medieval church in September 2016. But Mr Watts failed to apply for the consistory court’s permission, known as a faculty, to let the work go ahead. Mark Blackett-Ord, the chancellor of the diocese, said Mr Watts was the “driving force” behind the decision to install Sarnafil, a roofing membrane made of plastic and other materials, without permission. Now a church court has ruled that he must pay the costs of the hearing after heritage groups said the new roof was “visually objectionable”. The Grade I church dates from the 13th and 14th century and is of “outstanding architectural quality”, the chancellor said.  read more

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