South African English is lekker!

first_imgSouth Africans speak English, but that doesn’t mean you’ll always understand us. Our “robots” are nothing like R2D2, “just now” doesn’t mean immediately, and “babbelas” is not a shampoo. Here’s an informal guide to our weirder words.“Bunny chow” is a curry served in a hollowed-out loaf of bread. It is usually eaten with the fingers, not a knife and fork. (Image: Brand South Africa)South African English has a flavour all its own, borrowing freely from Afrikaans, which is similar to Dutch and Flemish, as well as from the country’s many African languages. Other words come from Indian, Malay and colonial Portuguese influences.Note: In many words derived from Afrikaans, the letter “g” is pronounced in the same way as the “ch” in the Scottish “loch” or the German “achtung” – a kind of growl at the back of the throat. In the pronunciation guides below, the spelling for this sound is given as “gh”.Aabba: Carry a child secured to one’s back with a blanket. From the Khoi-San.amasi: [pronounced “um-ah-see”] A popular drink of thick sour milk. From isiZulu. An alternative name is maas.apartheid: [ap-art-hate] Literally “apart-ness” in Afrikaans, apartheid was the policy of racial separation, and the resulting oppression of the black majority, implemented by the National Party from 1948 to 1990.Read more: A short history of South Africaag: [agh] Generally used at the beginning of a sentence, to express resignation or irritation, as in: “Ag no man! What did you do that for?”Bbabbelas: [bub-buh-luss] A hangover.bagel: [bay-gell] An overly groomed materialistic young man, and the male version of a kugel.bakgat: [buck-ghut] Well done, cool, awesome.bakkie: [buck-ee] A pick-up truck.bergie: : [bear-ghee] From the Afrikaans berg, “mountain”, originally referring to vagrants who sheltered in the forests of Cape Town’s Table Mountain and now a word for anyone who is down and out.biltong: [bill-tong] This South African favourite is dried and salted meat, similar to beef jerky, although it can be made from ostrich, kudu or any other red meat.Read more: South African cuisinebioscope: A cinema or movie theatre, originally a defunct international English word that has survived longer in South Africa because of the influence of the Afrikaans, bioskoop.biscuit: In South Africa a cookie is known as a “biscuit”. The word is also a term of affection, as in, “Hey, you biscuit”.bliksem: To beat up, hit or punch; or a mischievous person.blooming: [blimmin] A variation on “very”, as in, “That new bakkie is blimmin big.”bobotie: [buh-boor-tee] A dish of Malay origin, made with minced meat and spices, and topped with an egg sauce.boerewors: [boor-uh-vors] Literally, “farmer’s sausage”. A savoury sausage developed by the Boers – today’s Afrikaners – some 200 years ago, boerewors is South African food at its most traditional.boet: [like “book”, with a t] A term of affection, from the Afrikaans for “brother”.boma: [bow-mah] An open thatched structure used for dinners, entertainment and parties.bonsella: Surprise gift, something extra, or a bribe. From isiZulu.born frees: South Africans who were born into a democratic South Africa – that is, after 1994.bosberaad: [borse-bah-raad] A strategy meeting or conference, usually held in a remote bushveld location, such as a game farm.bottle store: liquor store, off-licence.braai: [br-eye] An outdoor barbecue, where meat such as steak, chicken and boerewors are cooked, served with pap and bredie.bredie: [brear-dee] A traditional South African mutton stew, first brought to the country by Malay immigrants. It now refers to any kind of stew.bru: [brew] A term of affection, shortened from Afrikaans broer, meaning “brother”. An example would be, “Hey, my bru, howzit?”bunny chow: Delicious and cheap food on the go, bunny chow is curry served in a hollowed-out half-loaf of bread, generally sold in greasy-spoon cafes.bushveld: [bush-felt] Taken from the Afrikaans bosveld [“bush field”], the bushveld is a terrain of thick scrubby trees and bush in dense thickets, with grassy groundcover between.Ccafe: [kaf-ay, kaff-ee or kayff] The ubiquitous small neighbourhood convenience store, often found on street corners and stocking cigarettes, cold drinks and newspapers.chill bru: Relax, my mate. Take it easy.china: To most people, China is the world’s most populous country, but to a South African it can mean something entirely different. China means “good friend”, as in, “This oke’s my china”. It’s one of the few Cockney rhyming slang words to survive in the country, coming from “china plate” = “mate”.chommie: Friend, from the English, “chum”.cooldrink, colddrink: This is the common term for a soda, such as Coca-Cola. Ask for “a soda” in South Africa, and you will receive a club soda.Ddassie: The rock hyrax, a small herbivore that lives in mountainous habitats and is reputed to be the species mostly closely related to the elephant. The name comes from the Afrikaans das, meaning “badger”.Read more: South Africa’s wildlife wondersdeurmekaar: [dee-oor-muh-car] Afrikaans for confused, disorganised or stupid, as in, “He’s a bit deurmekaar“.dinges: [ding-us] A thing, thingamabob, whatzit, whatchamacallit or whatsizname, as in, “When is dinges coming around?”doek: [like book] A head scarf worn to protect a woman’s hair.dolos: Interlocking blocks of concrete in an H-shape, with one arm rotated through 90º. The dolos is a South African invention used to protect seawalls and preserve beaches from erosion. The name comes from the Afrikaans word for the knuckle bones in an animal’s leg. The plural is dolosse.Read more: South Africa’s wave-breaking dolossedonga: A natural ditch resulting from severe soil erosion. From the isiZulu for “wall”.donner: [dor-nuh] Beat up. From the Afrikaans donder, meaning “thunder”.dop: [dawp] An alcoholic drink: “Can I pour you a dop?” It can also mean failure: “I dopped the test.”dorp: A small town on the platteland.droewors: [droo-uh-vors] Dried boerewors, similar to biltong.dummy: A baby’s pacifier.dumpie: A South African beer served in a brown 340ml bottle.Durbs: The city of Durban.Read more: Head for the Durban beachfrontdwaal: [dwarl] Lack of concentration or focus: “Sorry, I was in a bit of a dwaal. Could you repeat that?”Eeina: [ay-nuh or ay-nar] Ouch! Can also mean “sore”.eish: [aysh] Used to express surprise, wonder, frustration or outrage: “Eish! That cut was eina!”FFixed up: Used to mean “that’s good” or “sorted”. Example: “Let’s meet at the restaurant.” The reply: “Fixed up.”flog: No whips implied. South Africans use flog to mean “sell”, as in, “I think it’s time I flogged this old car.”frikkadel: [frik-kuh-dell] A traditional meatball.fundi: [foon-dee] Expert. From the Nguni, umfundisi, meaning “teacher” or “preacher”.fynbos: [fayn-baws] “Fine bush” in Afrikaans, fynbos is a vegetation type unique to the Cape Floral Region, a Unesco World Heritage Site. Made up of some 6 000 plant species, including many types of protea.Ggatvol: [ghut-foll] Taken from Afrikaans, this means “fed up”, as in “Jislaaik, my china, I’m gatvol of working in this hot sun.” Translation: “Gee, my friend, I’m fed up with working in this hot sun.”gogga, goggo: [gho-gha or gho-gho] Insect, bug. From the Khoikhoi xo-xon.gogo: [goh-goh] Grandmother or elderly woman, from isiZulu.graze: Eat.Hhang of: Very or big, as in, “It’s hang of a difficult”, or, “I had a hang of a problem”.hanepoot: [haa-nah-poort] A sweet wine made from the muscat blanc d’Alexandrie grape cultivar.hap: [hup] Taste, bite, as in, “Take a hap of this”.hey: This popular expression can be used as a standalone question meaning “pardon” or “what”, as in, “Hey? What did you say?” Or it can be used to prompt affirmation or agreement, as in, “It was a great film, hey?”homelands: The spurious “independent” states in which black South Africans were forced to take citizenship under the policy of apartheid. Also known as bantustans.howzit: A traditional South African greeting that translates roughly as “How are you?”, “How are things?”, or simply “Hello”.Iindaba: [in-daa-bah] A conference or expo, from the isiZulu word meaning “a matter for discussion”.inyanga : A traditional herbalist and healer.is it: [as one word: izit] An expression frequently used in conversation and equivalent to, “Is that so?”Jja: [yaa] Yes.jawelnofine: Literally, “yes, well, no, fine”, all scrunched into a single word and similar to the rhetorical expression, “How about that?”jislaaik: [yis-like] An expression of outrage or surprise: “Jislaaik, I just saw Elvis!”jol: [jawl] A versatile word with many meanings, including “party”, “disco”, “having fun”, or just “thing”.Jozi: [jo-zee] The city of Johannesburg, South Africa’s largest city, which is also known as Joburg or Joeys.just now: If a South African tells you they will do something “just now”, they mean they’ll do it in the near future – not immediately, as in, “I’ll do the dishes just now.”Kkasie: [kaa-see] Shortened form of lokasie, “location” in Afrikaans, the older word for township. Refers to the low-income dormitory suburbs outside cities and towns to which black South Africans were confined during the apartheid era.khaya: [k-eye-ya] Home. From the Nguni group of languages.kif: Cool, neat, great or wonderful. From the Arabic kayf, meaning enjoyment or wellbeing.knobkierie: [k-nob-kee-ree] A fighting stick with a knob on the business end. From the Afrikaans knop [“knob”] and the Khoi-San kirri or keeri, meaning “stick”.koeksister: [kook-sister] A traditional Malay and now also Afrikaner sweet, made from twisted yeast dough, deep fried and dipped in syrup. The right-wing enclave of Orania in the Northern Cape even has its own statue to the koeksister. The word comes from the Dutch koek (“cake”) and sissen, meaning “to sizzle”.koki: [koh-key] A coloured marker or felt-tip pen.koppie: [kor-pie] A small hill.kraal: An enclosure for livestock, or a rural village of huts surrounded by a stockade. The word may come from the Portuguese curral [“corral”], or from the Dutch kraal, meaning bead, as in the beads of a necklace – kraals are generally round in shape.kugel: [koo-gell] An overly groomed materialistic young woman, from the Yiddish for a plain pudding garnished as a delicacy. A bagel is the male variety.kwaito: [kw-eye-toe] The music of South Africa’s urban black youth, a mixture of South African disco, hip hop, R&B, ragga, and a heavy dose of house music beats.Read more: Kwaito: much more than musickwela: [kw-eh-la] A popular form of township music from the 1950s, based on the pennywhistle, a cheap and simple instrument taken up by street performers. The term kwela comes from the isiZulu for “get up”, though in township slang it also referred to the police vans, the kwela-kwela. It is said that the young men who played the pennywhistle on street corners also acted as lookouts to warn those drinking in illegal shebeens of the arrival of the cops.Read more: South African musicLlaatlammetjie: [laart-lum-et-chie] The youngest child of a family, born [mostly by accident] to older parents and many years younger than its siblings. The word means “late lamb” in Afrikaans.laduma!: [la-doo-mah] A popular cheer celebrating goals scored at soccer matches, from the isiZulu for “it thunders”.Read more: Soccer in South Africalappie: [luppie] A cleaning cloth.lekgotla: [lek-ghot-lah] A planning or strategy session.lekker: [lekk-irr with a rolling r] Nice, good, great, cool or tasty.MMadiba: [muh-dee-buh] An affectionate name for former President Nelson Mandela, and the name of his clan.Read more: Nelson Mandelamake a plan: devise a way to overcome difficulties. “Leave it to me, I’ll make a plan.”mal: [mull] Mad, from Afrikaans.mampara: [mum-puh-rah] An idiot, a silly person. From the Sotho languages.mampoer: [mum-poo-er] Extremely potent brandy made from peaches or other fruit, similar to American moonshine. See witblitz.Marmite: Trade name of a dark-coloured spread made from vegetable extract and used on bread or toast.mealie: [pronounce mih-lih] Maize or corn. A mealie is a maize cob, and mealie meal is maize meal, the staple diet of South Africa, which is mostly cooked into pap. From the Afrikaans mielie.moegoe: [moo-ghoo] A fool, buffoon, idiot or simpleton.mossie: [morse-ee] Common name of the Cape sparrow, also applied to the house sparrow, and sometimes used to refer to any small undistinguished wild bird.muti : [moo-ti] Medicine, typically traditional African medicine. From the isiZulu, umuthi.Read more: Joburg’s king of muti museumMzansi: [m-zun-zee] A popular word for South Africa.Nnaartjie: [nar-chee] The South African word for tangerine, Citrus reticulata.nappy: A baby’s diaper.nca: Fine, beautiful. Pronounced with a downward click of the tongue.ne: [neh] “Really?” or “is that so?” Often used sarcastically.now-now: Shortly, in a bit, as in, “I’ll be there now-now.”Ooke, ou: A man, similar to “guy” or “bloke”. The word “ou” [oh] can be used interchangeably.Ppap: [pup] The staple food of South Africa, a porridge made from mealie meal (maize meal) cooked with water and salt to a fairly stiff consistency, stywepap being the stiffest. “Pap” can also mean weak or tired.papsak: [pup-suck] Cheap box wine sold in its foil container, without the box.pasop: [pus-orp] An Afrikaans word meaning “beware” or “watch out”.pavement: South Africans walk on pavements and drive cars on the road [at least that’s the idea]. The pavement is the sidewalk.piet-my-vrou: [peet-may-frow] The red-chested cuckoo, Cuculus solitarus. The name, an approximation of the bird’s call, literally means “Peter my wife” in Afrikaans.platteland: [plutt-uh-lunt] Farmland, countryside. Literally flat land in Afrikaans, it now refers to any rural area in which agriculture takes place, including the mountainous Cape winelands.potjiekos: [poi-chee-kors] Traditional Afrikaner food, generally a rich stew, cooked in a three-legged cast-iron pot over a fire. The word means “little-pot food” in Afrikaans.puffadder: A viper or adder of the species Britis arietans. From the Afrikaans pofadder.Rrand: The South African currency, which is made up of 100 cents. The name comes from the Witwatersrand (Dutch for “white waters ridge”), the region in Gauteng province in which most of the country’s gold deposits are found.robots: Traffic lights.rock up: To arrive somewhere unannounced or uninvited. It’s the kind of thing friends do: “I was going to go out but then my china rocked up.”rooibos: [roy-borss] Afrikaans for red bush, this popular South African tea made from the Cyclopia genistoides bush is gaining worldwide popularity for its health benefits.rooinek: [roy-neck] South Africans of British origin, from the Afrikaans for red neck, but without the connotations given the term in the US. It was first coined by Afrikaners decades ago to refer to immigrant British, whose white necks were particularly prone to sunburn.rubbish bin: Alternatively dustbin or dirt bin. Garbage can.Ssamoosa: [suh-moo-suh] A small, spicy, triangular-shaped pie deep-fried in oil. Originally made by the Indian and Malay communities, samoosas – known as samosas in Britain – are popular with all South Africans.sangoma: [sun-go-mah] Traditional healer or diviner.sarmie: Sandwich.scale, scaly: To “scale something” means to steal it. A “scaly person” is not to be trusted.shame: Broadly denotes sympathetic feeling. A South African admiring a baby, kitten or puppy might say, “Ag shame!”, to emphasise its cuteness.sharp: Often doubled up for effect as sharp- sharp! , this word is used as a greeting, a farewell, for agreement, or just to express enthusiasm.shebeen: A township tavern, illegal under the apartheid regime, often set up in a private house and frequented by black South Africans. The word is originally Gaelic.shongololo: Large brown millipede, from the isiZulu ukushonga, meaning “to roll up”.sjambok: [sham-bok] A stout leather whip made from animal hide.skebenga: [ska-beng-gah] Gangster, crook, criminal. From the Nguni word for gangster. See also skelm or skollie.skelm: [skellem] A shifty or untrustworthy person; a criminal.skinner: [skinner] Gossip, from Afrikaans. A person who gossips is known as a skinnerbek: “Jislaaik, bru, I’m going to donner that skinnerbek for skinnering about me.” Translation: “Gee, my friend, I’m going to hit that guy for gossiping about me.”skollie: [skoh-li] Gangster, criminal, from the Greek skolios, meaning crooked.skop, skiet en donner: [skorp, skeet en donner] Action movie. Taken from Afrikaans, it literally means “kick, shoot and beat up”.skrik: Fright. “I caught a big skrik” means, “I got a big fright”.skrik vir niks: Scared of nothing.slap chips: [slup chips] French fries, usually soft, oily and vinegar-drenched, bought in a brown paper bag. Slap is Afrikaans for “limp”, which is how French fries are generally made here.smaak stukkend: Love to bits. In Afrikaans smaak means “like”, and stukkend means “broken”.smokes: Cigarettes.snoek: [like book] A popular and tasty fish, often eaten smoked. A snoek braai is a real South African treat.sosatie: [soh-saa-tee] A kebab, often lamb on a stick.spanspek: [spun-speck] Cantaloupe, an orange-fleshed melon. The word comes from the Afrikaans Spaanse spek, meaning “Spanish bacon”. The story goes that Juana Smith, the Spanish wife of 19th-century Cape governor Harry Smith, insisted on eating melon instead of bacon for breakfast, causing her bemused Afrikaans-speaking servants to coin the word.spaza: Informal township shop.spookgerook: [spoo-ahk-ghah-roo-ahk] Literally, in Afrikaans, “ghost-smoked”. Used jokingly, the word means “mad” or “paranoid”.stoep: [stup] Porch or verandah.stompie: A cigarette butt. From the Afrikaans stomp, meaning “stump”. The expression “picking up stompies” means intruding into a conversation at its tail end, with little information about its content.stroppy: Difficult, unco-operative, argumentative or stubborn.struesbob: [s-true-zz-bob] “As true as Bob”, as true as God, the gospel truth.Ttakkies: Running shoes or sneakers. “Fat takkies” are extra- wide tyres.tannie: [tunny] An Afrikaans word meaning “auntie”, but also used to refer to any older female of authority.taxi: Not a metered car with a single occupant, but a minibus used to transport a large number of people, and the most common way of getting around in South Africa.to die for: An expression popular in the affluent suburbs of Johannesburg and Cape Town, denoting enthusiastic approval for an object or person: “That necklace is to die for.”tom: Money.toppie: Old man.townships: Low-income dormitory suburbs outside cities and towns – effectively ghettos – to which black South Africans were confined during the apartheid era.Read more: Soweto, heartbeat of the nationtoyi-toyi: A knees-up protest dance.tsotsi: A gangster, hoodlum or thug – and the title of South Africa’s first Oscar-winning movie.tune grief: Cause trouble.Uubuntu: Southern African humanist philosophy that holds as its central tenet that a person is a person through others.Read more: An ubuntu Buddhist in IxopoVveld: [felt] Open grassland. From the Dutch for “field”.velskoen: [fell-skun] Simple, unworked leather shoes.vetkoek: [fet-cook] “Fat cake” in Afrikaans, vetkoek is a doughnut-sized bread roll made from deep-fried yeast dough. Mainly served with a savoury mince filling, it is artery-clogging and delicious.voetsek: [foot-sak] Go away, buzz off.voetstoots: [foot-stoots] “As is” or “with all its faults”. The term is used when advertising, for example, a car or house for sale. If the item is sold “voetstoots”, the buyer may not claim for any defects, hidden or otherwise, discovered after the sale. From the Dutch met de voet te stoten, meaning “to kick”.vrot: [frot] Rotten or smelly.vuvuzela: [voo-voo-zeh-lah] A large, colourful plastic trumpet with the sound of a foghorn, blown enthusiastically by virtually everyone in the crowd at soccer matches. According to some, the word comes from the isiZulu for “making noise”.Wwindgat: [vint-ghut] Show-off or blabbermouth. Taken from the Afrikaans, it literally means “wind hole”.witblitz: [vit-blitz] Potent home- made distilled alcohol, much like the American moonshine. The word means “white lightning” in Afrikaans. See mampoer.Yyebo: Yes. Used to show agreement or approval. From isiZulu.Brand South Africa reporter. Additional information sourced from Wiktionary, Wikipedia and the Rhodes University Dictionary Unit for SA English.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

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Had your auxin training yet?

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest With the growing now of dicamba resistant soybeans and the products to spray on them, we need a plan to avoid the problems we saw with drift and volatility in some areas last year. That means everyone who uses a dicamba product on soybeans must be a Licensed Pesticide Applicator and attend auxin training from the manufacturer; registration and locations found at these websites:www.roundupreadyxtend.com/stewardship/educationhttps://events.basf.uscampaigns/engenia/#stewardshipwww.fexapan.dupont.comFrom my one and a half hour training I learned that to use the products you must:Keep records.Follow buffer requirements.Use no AMS.Apply with an approved nozzle that will deliver large droplets.At 24 inches above the canopy.In winds between 3 and 10 miles per hour.But drive below 15 miles per hour.And spray small weedsPlus rinse 3 times after application.And more…The current labels for the dicamba-soybean products say we shall spray 4-inch or smaller weeds — however, READ the LABEL, the label is the law. But one farmer pointed out to me that the sales representative showed data in their auxin training class that their product will take down 12-inch weeds. Ohio’s farmers already know how to stretch a ruler, so let’s teach that to spray small weeds is a way to delay the development of resistant weeds. Do remember we already have weeds in Ohio resistant to glyphosate and to auxin herbicides. Use a pre-emergent herbicide, spray post small and allow no seed production.last_img read more

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Farm safety: Time to shift into high gear

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Dee JepsenThis year’s National Farm Safety and Health Week commemorated the hard work, diligence, and sacrifices made by our nation’s farmers and ranchers.The 2019 theme is “Shift farm safety into high gear.” The national theme reminds us that harvest is one of the highest seasons for unexpected deaths and serious injury. In Ohio, our state rates increase in the summer months and continue to rise through October.During harvest season, it’s important to shift our minds towards safety. Each day of the national campaign, there will a focus on different topics. Tractor safety and rural roadway safetyThere is no surprise that the tractor is the most common injury agent on Ohio farms. In the past 10 years, tractors and towed machinery represent 61% of all Ohio farm deaths. Common reasons for injury include rollovers, runovers, PTO and roadway crashes. Farmer health and suicide preventionSeveral factors have increased the overall stress level for the 2019 farming season. While farming can be a stressful occupation, a combination of weather, markets, and other financial changes within commodity sectors have taken a particularly hard toll on Ohio agriculture. Additional resources are available to help the family farmer through stressful times through the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (mha.ohio.gov) or a confidential crisis hotline is available 24/7 by texting HOME to 741741. People care, and people are there to listen. Safety and health for youth in agricultureIn no other industry are family members, especially children, able to accompany their parents into the workforce like agriculture. Keeping youth safe while they are on the job is a reason for Safety in Agriculture for Youth project. Through this national initiative, educational resources are available to anyone interested in farm safety materials. A national clearinghouse has a website of materials for agricultural science teachers, 4-H clubs, parents and employers. Check out the SAY link at https://ag-safety.extension.org/safety-in-agriculture-for-youth. Confined spaces in agricultureGrain bins are considered confined spaces and pose various health and safety risks for farmers. On-farm grain storage has increased over the years, where farmers are able to store and manage their crop for longer periods of time. The longer the grain is in the bins, the longer these risks need managed. Safety risks can be managed by following several best management practices: avoid working alone at the bin, lock-out equipment when performing maintenance, and wear a fall protection harness when working at heights (inside and outside of the bin).The two primary health risks at the bin are noise induced hearing loss and over-exposure to organic dust. Many operations have equipment operating over 80 decibels, and good hearing protection — either plugs or muffs with an NRR of at least 15 — will keep the ears from ringing. Grain dust is not only comprised of plant material but also insect parts and other residues. Oftentimes these particles are the size that can lodge deep into the respiratory track. Wearing an two-strap N-95 respirator offers the best protection. A single strap paper mask is not adequate for organic grain dust. Safety and health for women in agricultureA recent USDA report indicates more women are entering the agricultural workforce, or designated as the primary operator. While Ohio data does not show an increase in women injuries or fatalities, the Ohio Agricultural Safety & Health program has recently created educational resources specific for women farmers. The safety messages are catered to the types of equipment female operators are likely to use, and the types of tasks they perform. To request more on this topic, please contact the author of this article.It’s time to kick our efforts into high gear and address the main hazards and populations at risk. By working together, Ohio farms can reduce their injury rates.Be ready to engage with the Ohio Agricultural Safety and Health program through social media and share messages with others in your network. Our Facebook page is OSU Ag Safety & Health, and our Twitter handle is OSUAgSafety. Dee Jepsen, Associate Professor, can be reached at 292-6008 or jepsen.4@osu.edu. This column is provided by the OSU Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, OSU Extension, Ohio Agricultural Research & Development Center, and the College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.last_img read more

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You Mean Green Building Does Not Cost More?

first_imgOne of the GBA Business Advisors, Michael Strong, made the local FOX news broadcast for a home that his company, GreenHaus Builders, built a couple of years ago. The energy bills are much lower than the neighbors’ and the customers are thrilled with the comfort and style. “My answer for anybody who is on the fence about building green is – jump,” says owner David Ronn. FOX coverage is here: http://www.myfoxhouston.com/dpp/news/local/091123-green-memorial-homelast_img

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Your Best Options for High Frame Rate Filmmaking

first_imgOn the market for a new camera that shoots high frame rates? We’ve got you covered with this list of options.Top image from TheOneRing.netI’ve believed for sometime now that high frame rate is going to be a big part of the future of cinema, we just need a few other things to happen first. For example, we need glasses free 3D, binaural sound, brighter HFR enabled projectors and filmmakers willing to experiment. Interestingly enough, as TubeFilter writes, YouTube has long been an advocate for high frame rate and now offers HFR options.One note before we begin… our list is made up of digital cameras that are used as the A or B Camera, but also offer some type of high frame rate recording. So no Phantom Flex 4K, which is an insanely impressive camera. With that said, here is our list of the best options for high frame rate filmmaking broken down by the major camera manufactures.ARRIFirst up on our list is ARRI, the industry standard manufacturer. If you’re watching an Academy Award-winning film or a big tent pole film, chances are it was shot on an ARRI cinema camera. All three models listed below offer filmmakers high frame rates, from 1 to 120 depending on format and recording resolution. For most filmmakers, the only way we’ll get to shoot on an ARRI is if we have some substantial backing, because these cameras, including the new ALEXA Mini, are anything but cheap.AMIRA PREMIUM1-100 fps 1K & 2K1-60 fps 4KPRICE: $45,000ALEXA XT PLUS1-120 fps 1K1-60 fps 2K1-120 fps DNxHD1-120 fps ARRIRAWPRICE: $70,940ALEXA MINI1-200 fps ProRes HD1-120 fps ARRIRAWPRICE: $45,000Here is is a high frame rate video sample directly from ARRI.REDRED has been climbing up the ranks in the Hollywood production scene for some time now. It’s not surprising when you consider that A-list directors such as David Fincher and Steven Soderbergh back the camera manufacturer. However, unlike the ARRI series of cameras, the RED line of cams offer a much broader range of frame rate flexibility.WEAPON DRAGON1-100 fps 6K1-120 fps 5K, 4.5K1-150 fps 4K1-200 fps 3K1-300 fps 2KPRICE: $67,500EPIC-M DRAGON1-100 fps 6K1-120 fps 5K, 4.5K1-150 fps 4K1-200 fps 3K1-300 fps 2KPRICE: $44,160 (Pro Collection)SCARLET DRAGON1-12 fps 6K1-48 fps 5K, 4.5K1-60 fps 4K1-80 fps 3K1-120 fps 2KPRICE: $20,340 (Canon Collection)In this video from Alksander Fremstad Askim, we get some great HFR footage at 300 fps in 2K.SONYSony cameras are popular in Hollywood — especially the F65, which was used for films such as Oblivion, After Earth, and Lucy. Sony has been in the high frame rate filmmaking game for a long time and they have the best frame rate range of all the cameras on this list. The only downside with Sony is that you usually have to purchase an add-on to capture HFR at higher resolutions.F651-60 fps 4K1-120 fps 2K1-120 fps HDPRICE: $65,000F551-60 fps 4K1-120 fps 2K1-120 fps HDPRICE: $28,900FS7001-60 fps 4K1-240 fps 2K1-960 fps HDPRICE: $4,999PRICE: $2,200 (HXR Interface Unit for 2K & 4K RAW Recording)Here is video from Naive Studio showing off the ability of the FS700.CANONCanon has been in the camera game for a long time and they offer the widest variety of camera options. from professional to consumer. While the C500 will give you the widest range in terms of frame rate flexibility, the C300 does offer up to 60 fps for a much cheaper price point.C5001-60 fps 4K1-120 fps 2K & HDPRICE: $15,999C3001-60 fps 2K & HDPRICE: $6,9995D MARK III1-60 fps HDPRICE: $2,499In the following video, Magnanimous Media collaborates with fashion photographer Billy Rood to test the Canon C500’s capabilities at 4K Half Raw 120fps.BLACKMAGIC DESIGNThe newcomer on the block, Blackmagic Design has developed a line of cameras that give you incredible image quality at a price that wont kill your budget. The URSA and URSA Mini are incredible cameras that offer an impressive frame rate range while also giving you the ability to shoot in 4K. I think it’s safe to say that Blackmagic is here to stay — and they’re here to change the game and how it’s played.URSA 4.6K1-120 fps 4K RAW1-150 fps HDPRICE: $7,495URSA MINI1-60 fps 4K RAW1-160 fps HDPRICE: $2,995MICRO CINEMA CAMERA1-60 fps HDPRICE: $995To show off the power of the URSA, here’s a video from Louder Than Words.Let’s Slow Things Down on Our OwnTwixtor ProIf you have footage that you shot at anywhere from 60-250 fps, but you want to slow it down even more, then Twixtor Pro is for you. This plugin can be used with a long list of software that include After Effects, Premiere Pro, Final Cut Pro X, Avid, Resolve, and many more. Just be aware that Twixtor isn’t a free plugin and can set you back some.PRICE: $595Final Cut Pro Optical FlowOptical Flow is a retiming tool within Final Cut Pro X. What’s amazing is that it can deliver some really impressive slow motion effects to your footage by retiming them directly within the app without the need for a plugin.Want more content on cameras? Then check out these articles from PremiumBeat.Just How Expensive Are Real Cinema Lenses?Sony Product Announcement: 4 Full-Frame E-Mount Lenses for A-Series CamerasWhy You Should Be Investing In Fully Manual LensesDo you use any of these cameras? Have you had experience shooting HFR? Let us know all about it in comments below.last_img read more

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10 months agoAjax midfielder De Jong accepts Barcelona contract offer

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Ajax midfielder De Jong accepts Barcelona contract offerby Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveAjax midfielder Frenkie de Jong has accepted a contract offer from Barcelona.Sport says the Blaugrana have taken a big leap forward in the push for the Ajax midfielder in recent weeks. De Jong has now given the OK to the club’s proposal, waiting for the two sides to reach an agreement for his fee. Barca has wanted to put a reservation on the player, who has always shown his willing to play at Camp Nou, to try and negotiate a lower fee.Barca have agreed with them that they can move for De Jong in June 2019 if the player wants to go – which he does. last_img

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Kansas State Coach Bill Snyder Wrote A Congratulatory Letter To TCU QB Trevone Boykin

first_imgBill Snyder featured with his headset on.WACO, TX – NOVEMBER 17: Head coach Bill Snyder of the Kansas State Wildcats during a game against the Baylor Bears at Floyd Casey Stadium on November 17, 2012 in Waco, Texas. (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)This past Saturday, TCU quarterback Trevone Boykin led his team to an incredible come-from-behind victory against Kansas State, rallying the Horned Frogs from an 18-point second-half deficit. Friday, it was revealed by Boykin that Wildcats head coach Bill Snyder went out of his way to congratulate the senior signal-caller on the accomplishment. Yep, you read that correctly.Snyder, as he often does, wrote a congratulatory letter to Boykin following the game. Boykin posted a photo of the note to Twitter:I have so much respect for Coach Snyder and his Kansas st football team! #LivingLegend pic.twitter.com/An0ANnJgME— Trevone BoyKING (@OGcURIOUSDEUCE) October 16, 2015Last week, Snyder wrote a similar note to Oklahoma State’s kicker after he nailed the game-winner against the Wildcats.Snyder is regarded as one of the classiest coaches in college football, so this doesn’t come as a surprise. Well done, yet again.last_img read more

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PO Ports to Operate French Ports Container Terminal

first_imgzoom UAE-based port operator P&O Ports has won a three-year management contract to operate the container terminal in the Port de Sète in the south of France.Under the deal, P&O Ports will operate a container yard with a draft up to 14,5 meters with 457 meters of quay and adjacent 2 hectares land. The container terminal is expected to commence operations in October 2017.The company has the possibility to convert the contract to a long-term concession in the future.Port de Sete is a deep draft port, handling frozen, chilled, general and breakbulk cargo, containers, ro-ro services and livestock alongside cruise and ferry terminals, a marina, cement handling facilities and an agro-industrial complex.“Port De Sète has great potential and is ready to become another gateway port for France. In the early stages it will continue to primarily cater for feeder services in the eastern Mediterranean, the Maghreb region and North Africa,” Sultan Ahmed Bin Sulayem, Chairman of Ports Customs and Freezones Corporation (PCFC) in Dubai, said.“Once development takes place with the backing of our regional partners we expect to see more multinational shippers use its services with other international destinations added over time,” Bin Sulayem added.last_img read more

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First Nations environmental activists celebrate court ruling on Trans Mountain pipeline

first_imgTina HouseAPTN NewsSeveral First Nations and environmental groups are celebrating what they call a “landmark” victory on the Trans Mountain pipeline project, after the Federal Court of Appeal ruled Canada had failed to properly consult with Indigenous groups.APTN‘s Tina House has the story.last_img

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RBC CEO warns that banks may be sidelined in age of social

first_imgTORONTO – Banks are at risk of being pushed to the sidelines in the age of social media and big data, Royal Bank of Canada’s chief executive David McKay said Friday.Customers are increasingly leaving a digital trail of their financial plans on social media or search histories, such as buying a house, allowing technology giants to not only capitalize on that information, but potentially get into banking themselves, McKay said.“As these technology players realize their digital dividend there is a risk that our visibility with clients will diminish in the networked economies — or ecosystems — of the future,” he told shareholders at RBC’s annual meeting on Friday.Technology continues to reshape the financial services landscape as more consumers do their banking online or via smartphone rather than in physical branches. McKay said Friday that mobile is now RBC’s number one digital channel, with 3.4 million active users, up 19 per cent over the last year.In turn, Canada’s biggest banks have been investing heavily in technological innovation to stay ahead of the curve. During the last fiscal year, RBC spent more than $3-billion on technology, including on digital initiatives, cybersecurity and artificial intelligence.And while smaller financial technology companies are both partnering with and competing with traditional banks, larger tech companies and their deep pockets present a more formidable threat.Last month, for example, it emerged that Amazon was in talks with two large U.S. banks to start offering a chequing-like product to the e-commerce titan’s customers, according to the Wall Street Journal.McKay said there is a risk that these companies in search, e-commerce or social may be the first to deduce what customers’ needs are and direct them to financial institutions willing to pay for that information, but also get into banking themselves.“We think about somebody getting between you and your customer with that information, and start influencing the customer to choose other providers.”He added that RBC, Canada’s largest bank, has identified a number of digital “ecosystems” where its clients live and work within which the bank believes it can play an “integral role in the future.”McKay pointed to RBC’s recently released Drive app, which allows users to store car-related information, track trips and book service appointments.“We’re preparing ourselves for a world where others can see what you are trying to do before we see it,” he told reporters. “So we have a number of strategies to make sure that we stay connected to our customers. So we understand what’s going on and we can be relevant.”RBC is also investing heavily in artificial intelligence, and now has more than 200 data scientists working across the bank.While data allows RBC and other companies to develop more relevant products and refine its approach to customers, it is important to balance this with transparency, McKay said.The recent revelations that the Facebook data of millions of users was improperly shared with political consultancy Cambridge Analytica, among other things, has prompted a “healthy dialogue” about how personal information should be handled.He said regulations may be needed to set the boundaries, but hoped that would not be necessary.“We’re poised for a societal discussion on how we’re going to use personal information… The way I think that we have acted in the past, globally, as government, industries, whatever it happens to be, may not be sufficient to meet societal norms going forward.”last_img read more

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