POLICE LOG for April 20 Serious Car Crash With Injuries Car vs

first_imgHopkins Street is closed to through traffic due to a serious motor vehicle crash just before the #Billerica Line. Seek alternate routes. #WilmingtonMA pic.twitter.com/D4Gp5PLWrj— Wilmington MA Police (@WilmingtonMAPD) April 20, 2018—(DISCLAIMER: This information is public information.  An arrest does not constitute a conviction.  Any arrested person is innocent until proven guilty.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip?Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedPOLICE LOG for September 5: Train Conductor Helps Locate Missing Puppy; Rented Trucks Not Returned To UHaulIn “Police Log”POLICE LOG for July 27: OUI Arrest; Woman Brings Caged Bird To Town BeachIn “Police Log”POLICE LOG for July 25: Wilmington Man Arrested For OUI; Men Carrying Sledgehammers Down Street; Turkeys Causing TrafficIn “Police Log” WILMINGTON, MA — Here are highlights from the Wilmington Police Log for Friday, April 20, 2018:A Fitz Terrace caller reported a male party was fishing on private property. Police responded and moved the man along. (8:03am)A vehicle stroke a pole on Grove Avenue. No injuries noted. RMLD notified. (1:45pm)Police was flagged down by passerby complaining there was a dog on town beach. Police advised the dog owner and moved them along. (5:49pm)A walk-in party reported she was the victim of a fraud. (5:52pm)A bad 2-vehicle crash, with injuries and an entrapment, took place between a black 2005 Honda Civic and blue 2008 Toyota Prius at Hopkins Street and Dorchester Street. One driver was unconscious, the other was entrapped. Road was shutdown. A mailbox was damaged due to the accident. A dog, which was in one of the vehicles, was transported to the vet. Tewksbury, Billerica and Burlington Fire Departments also responded and/or provided mutual coverage. Police filed an immediate threat against the operator of the Honda and faxed the paperwork to the RMV.  (6:30pm)—last_img read more

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FCC chairman addresses 5G safety concerns in letters to lawmakers

first_img Share your voice FCC 6 Mobile FCC Chairman Ajit Pai says lawmakers need not worry about 5G safety concerns.  / Getty Images FCC Chairman Ajit Pai is trying to quell fears among lawmakers that 5G radios are dangerous to health. On Thursday, the chairman sent a series of letters to lawmakers in response to inquiries about health concerns related to 5G that been sent to him in the past couple of months. In each of the letters he said that the FCC places a “high priority on the safety of wireless services and devices.” He said the agency’s guidelines for RF exposure are derived from guidance from the Environmental Protection Agency, as well as the industry group the IEEE and the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. “The FCC relies on the expertise of health and safety agencies and organizations with respect to appropriate levels of RF exposure,” he said. “These institutions have extensive experience and knowledge in RF-related issues and have spent a considerable amount of time evaluating published scientific studies that can inform appropriate exposure limits.”The response comes as concerns about the safety of 5G wireless technology has been increasing among lawmakers on Capitol Hill. Three Congressmen in the past two months have sent letters to the agency expressing their concerns about potential negative health effects due to exposure to radio frequencies used in delivering 5G wireless service. Representatives Andy Kim, a Democrat from New Jersey,  Thomas Suozzi, a Democrat from New York, and Peter Defazio, a Democrat from Oregon, say their constituents are worried that 5G radios, which are being deployed atop street lights every few blocks in many communities, may have negative effects that are still unknown. “Small cell towers are being installed in residential neighborhoods in close proximity to houses throughout my district,” said Rep. Suozzi in his letter. “I have heard instances of these antennae being installed on light poles directly outside the window of a young child’s bedroom. Rightly so, my constituents are worried that should this technology be proven hazardous in the future, the health of their families and value of their properties would be at serious risk.”5G, which refers to the fifth generation of cellular technology, is the next big thing in wireless technology and it’s been hailed as the foundation for other big trends like self-driving cars and streaming virtual reality.Unlike previous generations of wireless, 5G will require up to five times the amount of infrastructure as 3G or 4G deployments. The big promise of 5G — a massive leap in speed — requires the use of super high-frequency radio waves, called millimeter-wave spectrum, that are limited by range and obstructions like trees. The result is a network requiring radios on every city block, versus 4G gear that transmits signals over miles.What this means is that there could be nearly 800,000 of these so-called small cells deployed in the US between 2018 and 2026 to provide 5G, according to a study commissioned by the wireless industry trade group CTIA. In a separate report, CTIA estimates that roughly 323,000 cell sites were in service at the end of 2017.Rep. Kim said in his letter that the FCC noted that the agency has not updated its regulations regarding radiofrequency RF safety since 1996. He also pointed out that the current RF safety guidelines don’t account for the higher frequencies that 5G service uses or the fact that so many more radios are needed to achieve 5G service coverage. He asked the FCC to answer a series of questions about what research has been conducted as it relates to the safety of 5G.”Despite the close proximity to sensitive areas where these high-band cells will be installed, little research has been conducted to examine 5G safety,” he said. He added that the FCC has admitted that its guidelines need to be reassessed with respect to the use of newer wireless technologies. Rep. Defazio noted that the Government Accountability Office made a similar recommendation in 2012. “It is unacceptable that six years later the FCC still has not conducted a reassessment of its 1996 guidelines,” Defazio said in his letter.In his letters, Pai noted that the FCC has had an open proceeding to address updating its guidelines since 2013. And he assured the lawmakers the agency is working through the “voluminous” record to see if anything needs to be changed or updated. But he did not address specific concerns brought up in the letters. He also offered to bring congressional staff into the FCC’s testing facility in Columbia, Maryland so that they could “see and speak with our engineers and technicians as they operate the RF testing equipment.”Pai’s response is consistent with comments he made to the press in April. When asked about the issue during a press conference in April, Pai acknowledged that the nature of 5G “will be very different” than  4G, since it relies on small cells. But he said that the radios operate at much lower power than traditional cell sites. He added that “from that perspective, I am confident that in consultation with the FDA, which is the lead on this issue, that the technology will be safe.” Tags Commentslast_img read more

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Jeep Cherokee and Wrangler India Launch Delayed

first_imgItalian automobile giant Fiat has been considering the launch of its iconic jeep in India for a while. A latest report now suggests that the launch of Jeep brand in India will not happen any time soon, as the company thinks that India’s current auto market deceleration could affect the vehicle’s sales.The company had earlier planned to launch its Jeep in India by the end of 2013. When that did not happen, auto enthusiasts speculated that the Jeep would enter the Indian market India at the 2014 Auto Expo, which is scheduled to take place next month (February).Though the launch of  Jeep sport-utility vehicle in India has been delayed, the company has not dismissed its plans for the sub-continent auto market, said a Wall Street India report. According to the report, the company is currently waiting for the market to pick up from the economic slowdown. Jeep’s entry with the enthralling Cherokee and Wrangler in Indian automobile industry will challenge car brands like Audi, BMW, Land Rover and Mercedes-Benz. “There were a number of changes in 2013 in terms of the economic conditions for launching new brands [in India],”Manley president and chief executive of Chrysler’s Jeep brand told Wall street India adding: “What I did was take another view of Jeep during the year and felt that 2013 wasn’t the right year with those changes to launch Jeep.”It looks like Fiat’s careful market approach is also a result of the company’s previously failed alliance in the country with Mahindra.last_img read more

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Indias largest cookiemaker Parle may cut up to 10000 jobs amid economic

first_imgFacebook/Parle GParle Products Pvt Ltd, a leading Indian biscuit maker, might lay off up to 10,000 workers as slowing economic growth and falling demand in the rural heartland could cause production cuts, a company executive said on Wednesday.A downturn in Asia’s third-largest economy is denting sales of everything from cars to clothing, forcing companies to curtail production and raising hopes that the India government will unveil an economic stimulus to revive growth.A sharp drop in Parle’s biscuit sales means the company may have to slash production, which may result in layoffs of 8,000-10,000 people, Mayank Shah, category head at Parle, said in a telephone interview from Mumbai.”The situation is so bad, that if the government doesn’t intervene immediately … we may be forced to eliminate these positions,” he said.Parle, founded in 1929, employs about 100,000 people, including direct and contract workers across 10 company-owned facilities and 125 contract manufacturing plants.Shah said demand for popular Parle biscuit brands such as Parle-G had been worsening since India rolled out a nationwide goods and services tax (GST) in 2017, which imposed a higher levy on biscuits costing as low as 5 rupees, or 7 cents a pack.The higher taxes have forced Parle to offer fewer biscuits in each pack, hitting demand from lower-income consumers in rural India, which contributes more than half of Parle’s revenue and where two-thirds of Indians live.”Consumers here are extremely price-sensitive. They’re extremely conscious of how many biscuits they are getting for a particular price,” Shah said.Parle, which has an annual revenue of above $1.4 billion, held talks over the past year with the government’s GST council as well as former Finance Minister Arun Jaitley, asking them to review tax rates, Shah added.Once known as Parle Gluco, the Mumbai-headquartered company’s flagship biscuit brand was renamed as Parle-G, and became a household name in India through the 1980s and 1990s. In 2003, Parle-G was considered the world’s largest selling biscuit brand.The slowdown in India’s economic growth, which has already led to thousands of job losses in its crucial automotive industry, was accelerating the drop in demand, Shah said.Market research firm Nielsen said last month India’s consumer goods industry was losing steam as spending in the rural heartland cools and small manufacturers lose competitive advantages in a slowing economy.Parle is not the only food product company to have flagged slowing demand.Varun Berry, managing director of Britannia Industries Ltd (BRIT.NS), Parle’s main competitor, said earlier this month that consumers were “thinking twice” about buying products worth just 5 rupees.”Obviously, there is some serious issue in the economy,” Berry had said on a conference call with analysts.Shares in Britannia were down 1.5%, as of 0620 GMT, having fallen as much as 3.9% earlier on Wednesday.last_img read more

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What Exonerations Mean For The Texas Death Penalty Debate

first_img X 00:00 /00:00 Share Listen To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: PexelsTexas is the state with the highest number of privately managed federal prisons that the Department of Justice will reduce and eventually eliminate.There are 242 people on death row in Texas. The crimes they were convicted of are deemed to be the most serious a person can commit. But are all of them guilty?KERA’s Christopher Connelly introduces us to one man who Anthony Graves says no. He spent more than 18 years incarcerated – 12 of them on death row – for a crime he didn’t commit. As part of our look at capital punishment in Texas that we’re calling State of Executions, we have this look at what exonerations mean for the death penalty debate.TSCThese days, Anthony Graves says he has a good life. He lives in a large house on a tree-lined street in a nice neighborhood in Houston, with his dog named Papi.“It is a Chihuahua mixed with a pitt – don’t ask me how that happened. I saw him on Doggy Oodles, and I felt like I needed to rescue him,” Graves explained.A decade ago Graves was on death row.  In 1992, Graves was wrongfully convicted as an accomplice to murder in the tiny town of Somerville. The murderer told police Graves helped him kill six people and burn down their house. The murderer later recanted, but Graves was still convicted, and sentenced to death by the state of Texas. “It was just mind boggling to me that this man was sitting across from me telling me that they’re going to kill me for something I know absolutely nothing about. And how am I supposed to process this and then continue to carry on?” Graves said.    Graves saw his execution postponed twice before his conviction was finally overturned. After 18-and-a-half years behind bars, Graves was exonerated and released in 2010. He now runs a foundation that re-examines questionable convictions and sentences.Mike Ware leads the Innocence Project of Texas and he says Graves is not an isolated case.“What my experience has taught me is that there are many undetected wrongful convictions in Texas prisons. And I know that because I know when we look for them we find them,” Ware said.More than three hundred people have been exonerated in Texas since 1989. Together, they spent more than 1,700 years behind bars. Most exonerees weren’t on death row, but thirteen of them – including Graves – were.Exonerations have skyrocketed in recent years. Part of that is science – more use of DNA evidence and changes in forensics. Many prosecutors’ offices now have units that re-examine possible wrongful convictions. And there are groups like the Innocence ProjectThe exonerations have spurred legislation. Nicole Casarez is the lawyer who helped free Anthony Graves.“Exonerations tell us what the causes of wrongful convictions are. If we study them, they’re like the black boxes on an airplane. They can tell us what goes wrong. And Texas has made some changes to address some of those issues,” she said.More reforms are being proposed in Austin this session. But Casarez says there is a bigger, systemic disparity that the death penalty illuminates.“There aren’t any rich people on death row. If you are poor, if you are unable to hire good counsel, you’re much more likely to end up with the death penalty. And that’s something I think we need to be concerned about,” she said.John Whitmire leads the criminal justice committee in the Texas Senate – and he says there are a number of ways the justice system still needs fixing. Still, he says we shouldn’t look past the vast majority of people on death row who have conclusively committed terrible crimes.“I take it very serious every time someone is executed. I reflect, I pause. Obviously we have a responsibility to do it right. But personally, I support the death penalty,” he said.Like Whitmire, 75 percent of Texans support the death penalty. That’s according to a 2015 poll from the Texas Tribune and UT Austin. That poll found 59 percent said they believe people are occasionally, or often wrongfully convicted in death penalty cases. Graves says exonerations make it clear that the justice system sometimes fails. “We still don’t want to acknowledge that we have a badly flawed justice system, from top to bottom. And it starts with the way we think, and the way we see other people, those who don’t look like us,” he said.So Graves says reform efforts are good – but they will always be too small, too weak, and too late until people are ready to grapple with the reality of capital punishment in Texas.last_img read more

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