Wilmington Social Worker Jennifer Baima Recognized By Care Dimensions

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Care Dimensions joined with the National Association of Social Workers to celebrate National Social Work Month in March.Among those recognized was Wilmington resident and Care Dimensions social worker Jennifer Baima.“Working within an interdisciplinary team, our social workers provide assistance to patients and families as they grapple with the emotional and practical issues that invariably arise from living with an advanced illness,” said Sandra Yudilevich Espinoza, director of Psycho-Social Support Services for the nonprofit organization.All of the social workers at Care Dimensions have earned a master’s degree in social work and have achieved one or two levels of licensure: LCSW or LICSW. And over half of these social workers have earned an advanced certification in hospice and palliative care through the NASW. The major goals of these hospice and palliative care social workers include encouraging expression of feelings, enhancing family communication, supporting the family in their coping, connecting families with community resources and education, and being a supportive presence to the patient and family throughout the journey at end of life.Care Dimensions is largest hospice provider to adults and children with advanced illness in Massachusetts. As a nonprofit, community-based leader in advanced illness care, Care Dimensions provides comprehensive hospice, palliative care, grief support and teaching programs in more than 90 communities in Eastern Massachusetts. Founded in 1978 as Hospice of the North Shore, Care Dimensions cares for patients — in their homes, in long-term care and assisted living communities, in hospitals, at its Kaplan Family Hospice House and, coming in the winter of 2017, at its new Greater Boston Hospice House in MetroWest.(NOTE: The above press release is from Care Dimensions.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedWilmington Social Worker Jennifer Baima Recognized By Care DimensionsIn “Business”Wilmington Nurse Tracy Boynton Honored By Care DimensionsIn “Business”Wilmington’s Goodhue Recognized By Child Life Council & Care DimensionsIn “Business”last_img read more

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Jeep Cherokee and Wrangler India Launch Delayed

first_imgItalian automobile giant Fiat has been considering the launch of its iconic jeep in India for a while. A latest report now suggests that the launch of Jeep brand in India will not happen any time soon, as the company thinks that India’s current auto market deceleration could affect the vehicle’s sales.The company had earlier planned to launch its Jeep in India by the end of 2013. When that did not happen, auto enthusiasts speculated that the Jeep would enter the Indian market India at the 2014 Auto Expo, which is scheduled to take place next month (February).Though the launch of  Jeep sport-utility vehicle in India has been delayed, the company has not dismissed its plans for the sub-continent auto market, said a Wall Street India report. According to the report, the company is currently waiting for the market to pick up from the economic slowdown. Jeep’s entry with the enthralling Cherokee and Wrangler in Indian automobile industry will challenge car brands like Audi, BMW, Land Rover and Mercedes-Benz. “There were a number of changes in 2013 in terms of the economic conditions for launching new brands [in India],”Manley president and chief executive of Chrysler’s Jeep brand told Wall street India adding: “What I did was take another view of Jeep during the year and felt that 2013 wasn’t the right year with those changes to launch Jeep.”It looks like Fiat’s careful market approach is also a result of the company’s previously failed alliance in the country with Mahindra.last_img read more

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Indias largest cookiemaker Parle may cut up to 10000 jobs amid economic

first_imgFacebook/Parle GParle Products Pvt Ltd, a leading Indian biscuit maker, might lay off up to 10,000 workers as slowing economic growth and falling demand in the rural heartland could cause production cuts, a company executive said on Wednesday.A downturn in Asia’s third-largest economy is denting sales of everything from cars to clothing, forcing companies to curtail production and raising hopes that the India government will unveil an economic stimulus to revive growth.A sharp drop in Parle’s biscuit sales means the company may have to slash production, which may result in layoffs of 8,000-10,000 people, Mayank Shah, category head at Parle, said in a telephone interview from Mumbai.”The situation is so bad, that if the government doesn’t intervene immediately … we may be forced to eliminate these positions,” he said.Parle, founded in 1929, employs about 100,000 people, including direct and contract workers across 10 company-owned facilities and 125 contract manufacturing plants.Shah said demand for popular Parle biscuit brands such as Parle-G had been worsening since India rolled out a nationwide goods and services tax (GST) in 2017, which imposed a higher levy on biscuits costing as low as 5 rupees, or 7 cents a pack.The higher taxes have forced Parle to offer fewer biscuits in each pack, hitting demand from lower-income consumers in rural India, which contributes more than half of Parle’s revenue and where two-thirds of Indians live.”Consumers here are extremely price-sensitive. They’re extremely conscious of how many biscuits they are getting for a particular price,” Shah said.Parle, which has an annual revenue of above $1.4 billion, held talks over the past year with the government’s GST council as well as former Finance Minister Arun Jaitley, asking them to review tax rates, Shah added.Once known as Parle Gluco, the Mumbai-headquartered company’s flagship biscuit brand was renamed as Parle-G, and became a household name in India through the 1980s and 1990s. In 2003, Parle-G was considered the world’s largest selling biscuit brand.The slowdown in India’s economic growth, which has already led to thousands of job losses in its crucial automotive industry, was accelerating the drop in demand, Shah said.Market research firm Nielsen said last month India’s consumer goods industry was losing steam as spending in the rural heartland cools and small manufacturers lose competitive advantages in a slowing economy.Parle is not the only food product company to have flagged slowing demand.Varun Berry, managing director of Britannia Industries Ltd (BRIT.NS), Parle’s main competitor, said earlier this month that consumers were “thinking twice” about buying products worth just 5 rupees.”Obviously, there is some serious issue in the economy,” Berry had said on a conference call with analysts.Shares in Britannia were down 1.5%, as of 0620 GMT, having fallen as much as 3.9% earlier on Wednesday.last_img read more

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Baltimore Area Leaders Seek to Remove a Number of Confederate Symbols in

first_imgralejandro@afro.com Baltimore area leaders are moving to address Maryland’s use and endorsement of Confederate symbols in the aftermath of the racially motivated shooting that left nine dead at Mother Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, SC, the oldest Black AME church in the south.On Monday (June 22), Baltimore City Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake called on the state of Maryland to stop issuing specialty license plates with the flag, a still potent symbol of slavery and White supremacy, while Baltimore County executive Kevin Kamenetz has asked Baltimore City for permission to rename Robert E. Lee Park to Lake Roland Park (the park is owned by the city but has been operated and funded by the county since 2009).“The mayor finds the Confederate flag to be divisive and offensive. She believes that it should not be allowed as a symbol on Maryland license plates and should be recalled,” said Howard Libit, director of strategic planning and policy for the mayor’s office, in an email to the AFRO.In Annapolis, the mayor’s call is already generating activity among Democratic party leaders in the General Assembly. Sen. Jamie Raskin (D-Montgomery County) is in the process of drafting a letter – to be signed by himself, senate majority leader Sen. Catherine Pugh (D-Baltimore City), chair of the Legislative Black Caucus Del. Barbara Robinson (D-Baltimore City), and Del. David Moon (D-Montgomery County) – to the Maryland Secretary of Transportation Pete Rahn on the issue.The U.S. Supreme Court recently handed down a decision (Walker v. Texas Division, Sons of Confederate Veterans Inc.) which held, in part, that license plates constitute government, not private speech. In light of this, Raskin says, the continued appearance of the Confederate symbol on Maryland license plates constitutes the endorsement of that symbol by the state itself.“The Confederate flag is the preeminent symbol of slavery, secession, armed rebellion against the government, White supremacy, and racial violence. It was the flag that waved during the Civil War for those forces that were attacking Union troops, and then even in the 20th century, after Brown v. Board was handed down, the Confederate battle flag was resurrected as the symbol of racism, Jim Crow, apartheid, and racial violence throughout the country. So hey, if [license plates] are government speech, we should dissociate ourselves from it as quickly as possible,” said Raskin.The name of Robert E. Lee Park in Baltimore County has been an issue for county staff going more or less back to the time the county took over operation of the park in 2009, according to County Executive Kamenetz.The decision had been made to request the name change three months ago (the city alone has the authority to change the name under the current agreement with the county), but the formal request was not made until the events in South Carolina moved the name change up the priority list.“Lake Roland [Park] would better describe the central amenity in the park and also be a more inclusive term that we want to represent in our increasingly diverse county,” said Kamenetz.Kamenetz’s request to the city comes on the heels of a number of racial controversies that have occurred in Baltimore County. Back in March, a number of residents from the county’s Bowleys Quarters area posted comments to Facebook indicating that the best way to deal with unknown Blacks in the neighborhood was to shoot them. In January, Kelli Murray, a Baltimore County emergency dispatcher, left her job after comments she made on Facebook criticizing police brutality against Black men drew the ire of the local police union and others, who saw Murray’s comments as a critique of police in general and called for her removal (Murray was not removed by the county, but chose to resign when she felt the county was doing little to investigate harassment she had received after her post began to draw attention).Kamenetz insists, however, that those incidents had no bearing on the request for the name change. “I think that the county has a good record in recent years for promoting diversity and inclusion. That being said, because we are such a large county (830,000 residents), there’s still some knuckleheads out there who choose to voice their opinion whether reasoned or not. But in terms of county leadership, our goal is to promote diversity and inclusion, and having this name change symbolically furthers that goal,” said Kamenetz.Baltimore City councilman Brandon Scott, anticipates that the city will move to approve Kamenetz’s request. “I don’t think we’ll fight that at all,” said Scott, adding, “It’s extremely important that we change the name of the park.”“We know what General Lee stands for, we know what that name stands for and what it means to so many people across this country. Not just those of African-American descent like myself, but other folks who understand that our country has a history that is not always a great history, and we have to try to remove that stuff from public [places] whenever we can. We wouldn’t have a park in our city named after Hitler, so we shouldn’t have one named after Mr. Lee as well,” said Scott.Baltimore City councilman Carl Stokes also said that he does not anticipate a fight over renaming the park, though there may be some discussion about whether ‘Lake Roland Park’ will win out as the alternative.“I think it’s a great idea to rename the park,” said Stokes. “I’ve been thinking about it 40 years, why it’s named for Robert Lee and why we have the monuments to Robert Lee and other Confederate quote-unquote heroes. . . . I don’t see any opposition, I support it, [and] I think almost everyone in city leadership and government will support it also.”last_img read more

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The Arrival of WebBased Printing

first_imgOctober 7, 2010 Earlier this fall, imaging giant HP announced a cloud-based desktop printer, the HP Officejet Pro 8500A Plus ($300, after $100 rebate from HP). Cloud-based printers connect directly to the Web via any broadband connection and can send and receive Web content like files, software and live news. Cloud-based printers can also print without a PC, which offers smaller firms the fascinating option of creating a Web-enabled walk-up imaging work station without the expense of having a full-blown computer to support it.As promised, the 8500A all-in-one bakes in all usual small-business imaging tools like printing, scanning, faxing and copying. But the 8500A also has its own Web address, can print without a PC and connects directly to the Web wirelessly or via a landed Ethernet connection. The unit is controlled with a 4.3-inch, iPhone-like, touch-activated screen that supports — get ready for this — iPhone-like apps.Approach this printer and you’ll get the option to copy, fax, scan or access coupons, read news from MSNBC or access business forms.Intrigued about what PC-less, Web-based, app-enabled printing might do the calculus of small-business imaging, I asked HP to send over a demo 8500A and used it in my six-person digital content company for about three weeks.Things to Love The 8500A is a first quality all-in-oneThe better all-in-one basics are here: 35 max pages per minute for average-density black-and-white pages and 34 for color. But plan on much slower speeds for photos, though image quality is excellent. Expect to wait about 20 seconds for the unit to boot up to print. There is direct-to-e-mail printing and receiving, and other nice features like two-sided ID printing, copy-fix features that adjust for bad scans and water-resistant inks that don’t run. Overall, it’s a nice unit.The Web-based features really set this thing apartThe news here is in the apps, which are activated buy an Apps logo on the touch screen, right next to scan functions. It leads to a series of software apps that range from kids’ stuff like Disney and Nickelodeon content to hard-core, small-biz tools like paper forms, pre-made document layouts, and believe it or not, news. HP has content relationships with, among others, MSNBC, USA Today and about a dozen or so big-traffic blogs. The printer then pulls them all together into a live news feed that is updated several times a day and can be printed directly from the machine with no PC; which opens an intriguing argument about how to view business information. I found passing a hard copy of news to my team was not that bad an idea. Shocker: Folks read it.Web control of your printingThe 8500’s app system and its many printer controls are managed by a la the iPhone and iTunes software from the HP ePrint web site, which is linked to your unique printer. Updating of apps is fast and robust. There are nice controls on content and some security features, plus some good support pages. Set up was fast and easy. If only iTunes worked this well.Things to HateThe death knell of the notion of the paperless digital officeYou will print. And print. And print some more with this unit: news, cards, reports, information, it all felt like a diabolical plot to amp up printing. Who know what actual print output will be long term, but as of now there is a 3-inch stack of paper sitting near this device, and it’s only been here for a week.Not enough appsApps are not just limited; they are basically non-existent. The HP website featured about two dozen apps, most with little small-business utility: some simple tools for forms, the new tie-in and online design tools. Unless the catalogue of software improves, there will not be much utility here.High cost of entryThese days, $300 is just not cheap for a desktop printer. Even powerful business, all-in-ones can be had for about half that price, with entry level printers running less than $50. Plus the actual cost per page is an unknown. The full set of black and white, blue, red and yellow replacement cartridges grosses up to $114 before taxes. And cost per page can vary widely depending on what and how often you print; but considering replacement cartridges for lower cost printers can be about as half the price, translating the gee-whiz factor of the 8500A into bottom-line results could be tricky.HP responded that more apps are due out in November, including new tools from Google and Reuters. And it is comfortable with it is charging for inks and hardware.Know what this printer can do, but be sure you need one before you buyIf this 8500 were priced around $200, and cartridges were price around $50 for a set, I would be all over it. But at these prices, you have to be careful. My gut is that for collateral-oriented shops, this unit will pay for itself with fewer trips to outside vendors like FedEx Office. Other businesses will need to take a harder look at the unit to understand what PC-less, cloud-based printing is and see whether it can work for them.I intend to be keep this unit in the testing fleet for a good, long time to see where costs and utility really are. So while some bumps in this product may keep many firms away, I fully expect that by this time next year, no firm will not want buy a printer that is not Web-enabled.Let’s be clear here: Cloud-based printing is the biggest thing to happen to desktop imaging since the laser jet.   Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. 5 min read Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals Register Now »last_img read more

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