Womens Health Steps Up Social Sharing of Content

first_imgBumgarner says that exclusive content will be delivered to its Facebook community via a new social reader app, called Get More Women’s Health, that, once enabled, can be customized so readers can pick and choose what information is relevant to them, and ultimately what they would like to consume. “It’s a Facebook articles page that allows you to read information from the website right there in Facebook in an essentially ad-free format,” says Bumgarner. “It’s similar to the social reader for Washington Post. It’s connecting social media to news articles—some are updated every day and some a couple times a month. We’ve embedded it with lots of extra information.”There are bonus workouts integrated into the social reading app in addition to a body mass index calculator, a health advice column and exclusive videos, among other things. Bumgarner says content that might have previously been put behind a pay-wall, or not always readily available, will be integrated for the brand’s Facebook fans. While the content is hosted within Facebook itself, some articles or videos link directly back to the brand’s own website, driving traffic from the social site to its ad-supported Web product.The move to have this exclusive content available on social platforms comes from audience habits.“Changing a diet or changing your lifestyle, sometimes those things are more easily accomplished when you feel like you’re doing them with other people,” says Bumgarner. “That’s the real power of this social community out there—it unlocks something new and dynamic for a Women’s Health reader that is looking to improve their life. In a way, it’s an ability to connect with people around you and decide to make those improvements together. The idea of social media can become relatively meaningful.”Bucking a Paid Content ModelIn addition to offering free content to Facebook fans, Rodale is also giving individuals the opportunity to digitally read some of its magazine free of charge, too. As tablets grow increasingly popular, publishers have breathed a sigh of relief knowing that individuals will purchase content digitally, a ship that seemingly sailed as the Internet developed. Yet, starting with its October issue, Women’s Health will enable iPad subscribers to share articles with non-subscribers—even those who receive an article without a tablet will still have the tablet reading experience regardless of the device.“We’re using a kind of new technology that’s part of the Adobe Digital Publishing Suite,” says Bumgarner. “We think it’s great for Women’s Health because we have an amazingly social audience, and we can share what we’re doing in the tablet world with other people out there. They can get a taste of the tablet experience and as a brand it allows us to bring together the tablet edition, print content and social media.”If someone downloads the October Women’s Health edition, an individual can share a story across her own personal social media channels by clicking a button within the iPad edition that has been incorporated by Adobe. “The page posted looks exactly like the tablet experience,” adds Bumgarner. “If there’s a video on that page or a 360 degree animation, all of those things are included and in the same dimensions of the tablet page. It will feel like a tablet, being very vertical and having the same interactivity.”Once an individual views a shared tablet page, they have the ability to click to the table of contents and read one more article. If clicking for a third, a prompt to become a customer appears.According to the Audit Bureau of Circulation’s most recent Fas-Fax report for the period ending June 30, 2012, Women’s Health had a total paid, verified and analyzed non-paid circulation of over 1.6 million, selling about 300,000 copies at newsstands and almost 51,500 digital replicas.“We’re proud of what we’re doing with the tablet and we want to get it to the women’s audience,” says Bumgarner. “We know that not everyone has a tablet, but we do want to share what we’re doing. We thought this would be a great way to take the initiative and move it out into the world.” On the heels of a social summer, Rodale’s Women’s Health is looking to get even more engagement momentum through a variety of community outreach strategies aimed at cultivating its audiences.About 18 percent of the brand’s monthly Web traffic now comes from Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest. The brand’s Olympic Twitter Takeover campaign, which took place in July, generated over 30 million Twitter impressions. Additionally, WomensHealthMag.com has recently seen a 171 percent jump in referral traffic from Pinterest.“We really want to give something special to our social community because we feel like it’s an important part of the direction that Women’s Health is going in,” says Sean Bumgarner, Rodale’s interactive design director. “We’ve seen tremendous growth on all of our social outlets over the last year, and especially the last six months.”last_img read more

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Ft Hunter Liggett Poised to Reach Net Zero

first_imgDesign work on a project to outfit dozens of building with solar panels and install a battery storage system at Fort Hunter Liggett is scheduled to begin shortly, putting the central California Army Reserve installation on a path to net zero energy use.The $22 million project, funded through the energy conservation investment program, includes 5 megawatts of photovoltaic power generation and a 3-megawatt-hour battery energy storage system. The 5-megawatt solar project will include about 500,000 square feet of roof-mounted photovoltaic arrays.Combined with a 2-megawatt array already operating and a 1-megawatt array under construction, the newest project will enable the 165,000-acre post to produce all the energy it consumes, Todd Dirmeyer, the installation’s energy manager, told the Army Engineering and Support Center, Huntsville Public Affairs.Fort Hunter Liggett will be the first installation to achieve net zero through an ECIP-funded project, according to the Corps’ Karen Moore.Since last year, the installation has been running a 1-megawatt-hour batter storage system, according to Dirmeyer.“The battery storage is part of the net zero equation — right now we charge it during the day with any excess solar we have, and we discharge it at night to help meet our off-peak loads — but it’s also part of our energy security solution,” Dirmeyer said. “We are working parallel paths toward net zero and energy security.”“I would like for us to be a model for this country and the world to follow. I think energy — to include the direct effects such as climate change — is probably the number one issue we have on this planet right now,” he said. Dan Cohen AUTHORlast_img read more

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FCC chairman addresses 5G safety concerns in letters to lawmakers

first_img Share your voice FCC 6 Mobile FCC Chairman Ajit Pai says lawmakers need not worry about 5G safety concerns.  / Getty Images FCC Chairman Ajit Pai is trying to quell fears among lawmakers that 5G radios are dangerous to health. On Thursday, the chairman sent a series of letters to lawmakers in response to inquiries about health concerns related to 5G that been sent to him in the past couple of months. In each of the letters he said that the FCC places a “high priority on the safety of wireless services and devices.” He said the agency’s guidelines for RF exposure are derived from guidance from the Environmental Protection Agency, as well as the industry group the IEEE and the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. “The FCC relies on the expertise of health and safety agencies and organizations with respect to appropriate levels of RF exposure,” he said. “These institutions have extensive experience and knowledge in RF-related issues and have spent a considerable amount of time evaluating published scientific studies that can inform appropriate exposure limits.”The response comes as concerns about the safety of 5G wireless technology has been increasing among lawmakers on Capitol Hill. Three Congressmen in the past two months have sent letters to the agency expressing their concerns about potential negative health effects due to exposure to radio frequencies used in delivering 5G wireless service. Representatives Andy Kim, a Democrat from New Jersey,  Thomas Suozzi, a Democrat from New York, and Peter Defazio, a Democrat from Oregon, say their constituents are worried that 5G radios, which are being deployed atop street lights every few blocks in many communities, may have negative effects that are still unknown. “Small cell towers are being installed in residential neighborhoods in close proximity to houses throughout my district,” said Rep. Suozzi in his letter. “I have heard instances of these antennae being installed on light poles directly outside the window of a young child’s bedroom. Rightly so, my constituents are worried that should this technology be proven hazardous in the future, the health of their families and value of their properties would be at serious risk.”5G, which refers to the fifth generation of cellular technology, is the next big thing in wireless technology and it’s been hailed as the foundation for other big trends like self-driving cars and streaming virtual reality.Unlike previous generations of wireless, 5G will require up to five times the amount of infrastructure as 3G or 4G deployments. The big promise of 5G — a massive leap in speed — requires the use of super high-frequency radio waves, called millimeter-wave spectrum, that are limited by range and obstructions like trees. The result is a network requiring radios on every city block, versus 4G gear that transmits signals over miles.What this means is that there could be nearly 800,000 of these so-called small cells deployed in the US between 2018 and 2026 to provide 5G, according to a study commissioned by the wireless industry trade group CTIA. In a separate report, CTIA estimates that roughly 323,000 cell sites were in service at the end of 2017.Rep. Kim said in his letter that the FCC noted that the agency has not updated its regulations regarding radiofrequency RF safety since 1996. He also pointed out that the current RF safety guidelines don’t account for the higher frequencies that 5G service uses or the fact that so many more radios are needed to achieve 5G service coverage. He asked the FCC to answer a series of questions about what research has been conducted as it relates to the safety of 5G.”Despite the close proximity to sensitive areas where these high-band cells will be installed, little research has been conducted to examine 5G safety,” he said. He added that the FCC has admitted that its guidelines need to be reassessed with respect to the use of newer wireless technologies. Rep. Defazio noted that the Government Accountability Office made a similar recommendation in 2012. “It is unacceptable that six years later the FCC still has not conducted a reassessment of its 1996 guidelines,” Defazio said in his letter.In his letters, Pai noted that the FCC has had an open proceeding to address updating its guidelines since 2013. And he assured the lawmakers the agency is working through the “voluminous” record to see if anything needs to be changed or updated. But he did not address specific concerns brought up in the letters. He also offered to bring congressional staff into the FCC’s testing facility in Columbia, Maryland so that they could “see and speak with our engineers and technicians as they operate the RF testing equipment.”Pai’s response is consistent with comments he made to the press in April. When asked about the issue during a press conference in April, Pai acknowledged that the nature of 5G “will be very different” than  4G, since it relies on small cells. But he said that the radios operate at much lower power than traditional cell sites. He added that “from that perspective, I am confident that in consultation with the FDA, which is the lead on this issue, that the technology will be safe.” Tags Commentslast_img read more

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IBM sacks 300 employees from services dept may hire talent in automation

first_imgAn employee speaks on a mobile phone as she eats her lunch at the cafeteria in the Infosys campus in the southern Indian city of Bangalore September 23, 2014.Reuters fileTech giant IBM recently laid off 300 employees from its software services division to make room for people with upgraded skills in automation, machine learning and cloud computing. The development comes days after US-based Cognizant cut off at least 200 mid-senior level positions from its India offices creating ripples in the IT industry. IBM has taken the decision “to reinvent itself” and meet the changing needs of customers.”This in accordance with IBM’s strategy to re-invent itself to better meet the changing requirements of our business and to pioneer new high-value services. IBM “remains committed to being an essential part of its (India’s) growth,” the company’s official statement said, according to Economic Times.The entire IT industry is currently doing away with the traditional software roles and undertaking training employees or hiring fresh talent which has upgraded skillset on emerging technologies. IBM said that it took the decision after a reassessment of the current workforce and an increasing demand of adding workforce to the cloud, artificial intelligence and other evolving areas. It added that several employees are even being re-trained to be able to meet the new challenges.Notwithstanding the claims made by multinational as well as India-based IT firms of increased hirings, a report by the McKinsey & Company suggested that nearly half of the workforce in the IT industry will become irrelevant in next two years. This poses a serious challenging to India’s IT industry which employs nearly 3.9 million people.The fact remains that new technologies will also add 14 lakh new jobs to India alone by 2027 but for that, the firms would have to retrain its existent workforce to cater to the demands of their clients.  ReutersEven as the IT firms have been reluctant to state that automation is slowly replacing the human workforce in the sector, the companies are looking for a replacement of basic jobs such as in services sector that no longer addresses their needs. The retraining of a majority of the existent employees could be an extensive exercise which is not preferred by the tech giants in India or elsewhere.last_img read more

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Nach Baliye 9 contestants list leaked Here are the names of shortlisted

first_imgNach Baliye 9TwitterNach Baliye 9 is all set to air on television soon and it is being said that Salman Khan, who is one of the producers of the dance reality show, will introduce the contestants to the viewers soon. But it looks like the final list of contestants has already been leaked online.According to the show’s theme, Nach Baliye 9 will see ex-couples participating on the show which has already created a lot of interest among the viewers. It is also being reported that Raveena Tandon has been finalised for the judges panel on the show. And Salman Khan will apparently take the judges’ seat as well.Divyanka Tripathi, who along with her husband Vivek Dahiya, was the winners of the previous season will be hosting the grand premiere of Nach Baliye 9.And while the speculations about the contestants participating in the show are running wild, here’s the names of the participants revealed by The Khabri on their Twitter handle.1. Urvashi Dholakia – Anuj Sachdeva2. Madhurima Tuli – Vishal Aditya3. Vindu Dara Singh – Dina4. Anita Hassanandani – Rohit Reddy5. Sourabh Raj – Ridhima6. Keith – Rochelle7. Faisal Khan – Muskaan8. Shantanu Maheshwari – Nityami9. Geeta Phogat – Pawan Kumar#NachBaliye9 #NachBaliye Final Confirmed list of ContestantsUrvashiDholakia -AnujSachdeva, MadhurimaTuli- VishalAdityaVinduDaraSingh- Dina AnitaHassanandani- RohitReddy SourabhRaj- RidhimaKeith- Rochelle FaisalKhan- Muskaan, ShantanuMaheshwari- Nityami.— The Khabri (@TheKhbri) June 26, 2019last_img read more

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What Flood Insurance Does And Doesnt Cover

first_img X Tomorrow (June 1) marks the start of yet another hurricane season, which may be hard to believe with many in Houston still recovering from Hurricane Harvey. And if you haven’t started preparing yet, well now is a good time to do so.Last week, we took you on a shopping trip for emergency supplies with Harris County Judge Ed Emmett. Today, we’ll tell you what you need to know about flood insurance. What does it cover? What doesn’t it cover? Should you get it?Joe Williams, a Houston-based insurance consultant with the firm PozmantierWilliams. 00:00 /09:07 To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code:center_img Listen Charlie Riedel/APHomes are surrounded by water from the flooded Brazos River in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey Friday, Sept. 1, 2017, in Freeport, Texas. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel) Sharelast_img read more

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