MPC Container Ships Joins Scrubber Ordering Wave

first_imgzoomIllustration. Image Courtesy: Pixabay under CC0 Creative Commons license Norwegian shipowner MPC Container Ships has entered into agreements for the purchase of exhaust gas cleaning systems for five of its ships.Under the deal, the scrubbers would be retrofitted on five selected vessels within the company’s fleet prior to the January 1, 2020 implementation date of the new sulphur emission cap regulation, as set forth by the International Maritime Organization.MPC said that the agreements also include options to purchase scrubbers for up to 50 additional vessels, allowing for further installations in both 2019 and early 2020, respectively.“Having conducted thorough analyses on the subject, we are excited about the opportunity to retrofit selected vessels with scrubbers as an economically attractive alternative of complying with the 2020 sulphur regulations. Moreover, the option to equip a larger portion of our fleet with scrubbers gives MPC Container Ships the strategic flexibility to adapt to new market environments as we deem fit,” Constantin Baack, CEO, said.The company “will be carefully evaluating further scrubber installations, on a vessel by vessel basis, and exercise further options in due course.”Additionally, the company informed that there is a significant interest from charterers for scrubber-fitted vessels and MPC is therefore in “well-advanced negotiations with charterers for mid- to longer-term charter parties at favourable rates.”Simultaneously, the company is evaluating additional charters and seeks to take advantage of the high optionality of its scrubber agreements.The investment program is expected to be financed with cash on hand and available debt capacity on the company’s existing fleet.last_img read more

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Bloomberg Philanthropies Makes 5 Million Investment To Help Deliver Light To Africa

first_imgBloomberg Philanthropies has announced a $5 million impact investment in Little Sun, creators of portable, solar-powered lamps designed by co-founders: artist Olafur Eliasson and engineer Frederik Ottesen.The company works with local entrepreneurs to sell its lamps to households where electricity is scarce or unavailable, at prices that are affordable to families currently using costly and toxic kerosene for their lighting. Little Sun operates as a social business, created specifically to address a social problem rather than to maximize profits.This is Bloomberg Philanthropies first-ever impact investment and will provide a low interest rate loan that will allow Little Sun to grow, providing clean and affordable energy to homes, schools and local business in Sub-Saharan Africa. The Foundation undertook a rigorous due diligence process to evaluate the viability of the Little Sun business model and determined that solar powered lamps can provide enormous environmental and social benefits.“Today, seven out of ten people lack access to even the most basic electricity in Sub-Saharan Africa. Over the next 20 years, Africa is poised to hold the world’s largest un-electrified population,” said Felix Hallwachs, Little Sun Managing Director and CEO. “The impact investment from Bloomberg Philanthropies will help us reach our goal of providing clean energy to homes, schools and local businesses, replacing toxic kerosene lamps everywhere we work. We consider access to clean, safe and sustainable energy a fundamental human right.”Currently, households in Africa not connected to the electric grid can spend up to 20% of their total budgets on kerosene, which is the primary source of light for many of these households. Breathing kerosene toxins is also damaging to health – four hours alone is equal to smoking 40 cigarettes. Additionally, global kerosene use has been estimated to emit up to 200 million tons of CO2 annually, which is the equivalent of emissions from approximately 60 large U.S. coal plants, heightening the need to develop sustainable alternatives.To provide the greatest number of people with access to the benefits of solar-powered light, Little Sun’s initial product is priced at the most affordable end of the spectrum of portable solar products. One solar-powered Little Sun light lasts for two to three years before needing a battery replacement, and can save households up to 90% over three years compared to what they would have spent on kerosene. The targeted price point still allows profits to be collected by the local entrepreneurs who sell the lights in their communities.“Too many families are forced to breathe in toxic kerosene fumes because they don’t have access to electricity. Solar-powered lights can improve their health – and at the same time, protect our environment – by keeping pollutants out of the air they breathe,” said Michael Bloomberg, founder of Bloomberg Philanthropies. “Little Sun is bringing clean, safe, affordable light to people who don’t have it today.”While other solar-powered lights are also available, Little Sun is unique in that it is the only light that is also a work of art, inspired by the power of sunlight and energy access.“I am thrilled by the confidence that Michael Bloomberg and his great team at Bloomberg Philanthropies have shown toward our unique social business model and our aim to bring light to people living off the energy grid. To promote solar power in the shape of a Little Sun is to invest in radical change for the lives of many while, at the same time, caring for the planet we share. Holding hands with the sun is holding hands with the future,” said Little Sun co-founder and artist Olafur Eliasson. “With a Little Sun in your hand, you become a power station – charging your lamp in the sun, you also empower yourself. Access to energy and light allows you to determine the direction of your life.”The lamp’s exceptional design and engineering has made it popular, not just in areas without electricity but around the world. Little Sun is sold at museum stores and other outlets in regions including the U.S. and Europe, at a higher price, utilizing the profits from these sales to keep off-grid sales prices locally affordable and to kick-start local businesses in off-grid communities. The Little Sun project was launched in 2012 at the Tate Modern in London, where the lamp continues to be available for purchase. They are also available for purchase online and in museums, like the MoMA Design Store in New York City and select retail stores in the U.S. and Europe.Source:PR Newswirelast_img read more

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Mike Trout Doesnt Need A Full Season To Put Up MVP Numbers

When Angels star Mike Trout went down for six weeks with a thumb injury at the end of May, it suddenly looked like the American League’s most valuable player title was anybody’s to claim. Would it be rookie sensation Aaron Judge? Or perhaps diminutive Astros sparkplug Jose Altuve would claim his first MVP crown. Could Boston’s strikeout machine Chris Sale work his way into the conversation? The race seemed wide open.Four months later, it’s becoming clear that we may have underestimated the best player in baseball.Trout returned from his first career DL stint after the All-Star break and started knocking home runs like he’d never left. In 51 games since his recovery, Trout has slashed .305/.457/.563, accruing a total of about 21 runs above an average player. Trout’s hitting has been so otherworldly that he has almost entirely closed the gap between himself and the best offensive players in baseball. Here’s a chart showing Trout’s Weighted Runs Created, which quantifies a player’s total offensive value, relative to the rest of the league since the start of the 2017 season. Throw in Trout’s decent defense and proficient base-stealing, and you have the league’s fourth-highest WAR total. And he’s gaining fast on current AL leader Altuve, who slowed down his pace of production slightly as the summer wore on, posting his worst on-base plus slugging rate in September. It’s a long shot, but Trout could pass Altuve in the next couple of weeks.Trout has been among the best players in baseball each full season he’s played. But he’s not only the best in his generation, he’s also the best player in history through ages 21-24. He’ll have to make up a little ground on Ty Cobb to extend that streak to age 25, but there’s no doubt that he’s on his way to an inner-circle Hall of Fame career.Even if Trout doesn’t manage to catch Altuve (or Cobb), he still has a legitimate shot at his third AL MVP award. While the WAR leaderboard doesn’t care about how good your team is, the same cannot be said for MVP voters. And that may be the best argument for Trout’s claim: The Angels are unexpectedly in the running for a wild-card spot, and they owe much of their success to Trout’s bat. To the Angels’ credit, they managed to slightly improve their playoff position in Trout’s absence, but their chances didn’t really take off until he came back.In retrospect, perhaps it was inevitable that Trout would make a run at league MVP. He is the king of consistency, after all. We can just add “injury” to the long list of factors, such as aging and opponent adjustments, that could end a mortal man’s career but barely seem to slow Trout. read more

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Happy Thanksgiving USA Turks Caicos restaurants join in

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items: Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, TCI, November 23, 2016 – It is Thanksgiving Day and a holiday in the United States today; and many of the restaurants will change their menus to mark the occasion with island panache, among them is Grace’s Cottage at Point Grace Resort – call and reserve your sumptuous spot.There is a holiday too for the Turks and Caicos, this Friday; it is recently instituted as the National Day of Thanksgiving.In the year of inception, 2014, Premier Rufus Ewing had said:  “As Christians it is essential that we recognize that as we journey through life, we must pause to give thanks for our existence and the goodness and mercies that have been bestowed upon us.” The holiday also means banks and most businesses will be closed until Monday.last_img read more

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Wilmington Social Worker Jennifer Baima Recognized By Care Dimensions

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Care Dimensions joined with the National Association of Social Workers to celebrate National Social Work Month in March.Among those recognized was Wilmington resident and Care Dimensions social worker Jennifer Baima.“Working within an interdisciplinary team, our social workers provide assistance to patients and families as they grapple with the emotional and practical issues that invariably arise from living with an advanced illness,” said Sandra Yudilevich Espinoza, director of Psycho-Social Support Services for the nonprofit organization.All of the social workers at Care Dimensions have earned a master’s degree in social work and have achieved one or two levels of licensure: LCSW or LICSW. And over half of these social workers have earned an advanced certification in hospice and palliative care through the NASW. The major goals of these hospice and palliative care social workers include encouraging expression of feelings, enhancing family communication, supporting the family in their coping, connecting families with community resources and education, and being a supportive presence to the patient and family throughout the journey at end of life.Care Dimensions is largest hospice provider to adults and children with advanced illness in Massachusetts. As a nonprofit, community-based leader in advanced illness care, Care Dimensions provides comprehensive hospice, palliative care, grief support and teaching programs in more than 90 communities in Eastern Massachusetts. Founded in 1978 as Hospice of the North Shore, Care Dimensions cares for patients — in their homes, in long-term care and assisted living communities, in hospitals, at its Kaplan Family Hospice House and, coming in the winter of 2017, at its new Greater Boston Hospice House in MetroWest.(NOTE: The above press release is from Care Dimensions.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedWilmington Social Worker Jennifer Baima Recognized By Care DimensionsIn “Business”Wilmington Nurse Tracy Boynton Honored By Care DimensionsIn “Business”Wilmington’s Goodhue Recognized By Child Life Council & Care DimensionsIn “Business”last_img read more

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BJP women netas dont want their husbands to meet PM Mayawati takes

first_imgBSP supremo Mayawati took a potshot at Prime Minister Narendra Modi.MONEY SHARMA/AFP/Getty ImagesAhead of the last and final phase of the Lok Sabha 2019 elections, politicians continue to mud-sling each other.Bahujan Samaj Party supremo Mayawati took a potshot at Narendra Modi after the Prime Minister accused her of “shedding crocodile tears” over the Alwar gang-rape. The BSP chief stated that women legislators in the Bharatiya Janata Party fear that if PM Modi meets their husbands, they will leave their wives as PM Modi did.Addressing a press conference, Mayawati said, “In BJP, married women leaders get scared when they see their husbands around PM Modi. They fear that this Modi will separate them from their husbands.” Mayawati said that Modi could not be expected to respect others sisters and wives when he had left his own wife for political gains.This is the first time that any political leader has criticised the Prime Minister’s personal life.Accusing Modi of playing politics over the Alwar rape case, Mayawati slammed the Prime Minister for showing sympathy for Dalits and said that his words rang hollow. “If Modi had genuinely been a backward caste person, he would not have objected to bungalows owned by Dalit and OBC people. He changes his caste every day for electoral gains,” she added.Mayawati said that Modi had tried to break the Samajwadi Party (SP)-BSP alliance and would earlier address her as ‘behenji’ but when he realised that the alliance would not break, he has started addressing her as ‘bua’.”The ‘sanskari’ people in the country address me as ‘behenji’. Even my parents call ‘behenji’ and so does Akhilesh Yadav,” she stated.Earlier on Sunday, May 12, Prime Minister Modi asked why BSP supremo Mayawati did not withdraw support to the ruling Congress in Rajasthan after a Dalit woman was gang-raped in front of her husband in Alwar on April 26. Addressing an election rally in Uttar Pradesh’s Kushinagar, PM Modi said: “A Dalit girl was gang-raped in Rajasthan which is being ruled by the ‘naamdar’ (Congress) with the support of BSP. Both the parties are trying to suppress the matter. The daughters of this state are asking ‘behenji’ why hasn’t she taken back her support to the Congress after the incident.”Meanwhile, Mayawati appealed to people to vote for the alliance in the final phase of elections. Uttar Pradesh will go to polls in the sixth phase on May 19. Results will be declared on May 23.last_img read more

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Nach Baliye 9 contestants list leaked Here are the names of shortlisted

first_imgNach Baliye 9TwitterNach Baliye 9 is all set to air on television soon and it is being said that Salman Khan, who is one of the producers of the dance reality show, will introduce the contestants to the viewers soon. But it looks like the final list of contestants has already been leaked online.According to the show’s theme, Nach Baliye 9 will see ex-couples participating on the show which has already created a lot of interest among the viewers. It is also being reported that Raveena Tandon has been finalised for the judges panel on the show. And Salman Khan will apparently take the judges’ seat as well.Divyanka Tripathi, who along with her husband Vivek Dahiya, was the winners of the previous season will be hosting the grand premiere of Nach Baliye 9.And while the speculations about the contestants participating in the show are running wild, here’s the names of the participants revealed by The Khabri on their Twitter handle.1. Urvashi Dholakia – Anuj Sachdeva2. Madhurima Tuli – Vishal Aditya3. Vindu Dara Singh – Dina4. Anita Hassanandani – Rohit Reddy5. Sourabh Raj – Ridhima6. Keith – Rochelle7. Faisal Khan – Muskaan8. Shantanu Maheshwari – Nityami9. Geeta Phogat – Pawan Kumar#NachBaliye9 #NachBaliye Final Confirmed list of ContestantsUrvashiDholakia -AnujSachdeva, MadhurimaTuli- VishalAdityaVinduDaraSingh- Dina AnitaHassanandani- RohitReddy SourabhRaj- RidhimaKeith- Rochelle FaisalKhan- Muskaan, ShantanuMaheshwari- Nityami.— The Khabri (@TheKhbri) June 26, 2019last_img read more

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How Some Teachers Students In Texas Are Responding To PresidentElect Trump

first_img X 00:00 /02:35 Share To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: The morning after Election Day, Montessori teacher Gina Applegate was greeting her students. Then one of her fourth graders arrived in tears. He sat in a bean bag and covered his face with his hoodie.Houston Public Media’s Coverage of Election 2016“He was sobbing, sobbing,” Applegate recounted. “When I went to ask him what’s the matter, he was inconsolable in that initial moment.”Applegate encouraged the 9-year-old to write down what was bothering him. Later he handed her a card. He wrote: “I am scared because Trump hates people of color like me and that is why I’m scared.”Applegate wrote her student, who is biracial, back.“I said, ‘I understand your fear, but there is hope because there are many people who care for all the different colors of people and you have the power in you to teach tolerance and show the world compassion. I’ll be there by your side. We’re in this together,” she read.Later she gathered the whole class at the private Montessori school north of Austin for a conversation about the election. She said they had already discussed different ways to hold elections around the world, but they revisited the Electoral College. Above all, Applegate said that she wants her students to understand different points of view and express their feelings — without a debate contest with winners and losers.It’s the kind of conversation that’s played out in schools across Texas following Election Day 2016.In Houston, Anastasia Anderson leads two charters, called Promise Community Schools. Many students are from all over the world, including Mexico, Pakistan and Syria. She says many children from kindergarten to eighth grade asked questions this week.“They’re questions like ‘Are we going to be sent back to our home countries? Why did such a mean man get a elected?” Anderson said. “Some are questioning, “Is it OK to talk about women the way we’ve heard women talked about?”Some students expressed fear about a wall between the United States and Mexico or being Muslim.Anderson said that it’s hard to answer the questions. Trump has maintained that his policies like a building wall with Mexico will make America better.On campus, Anderson wanted to give students a place where they could talk and express their feelings in a safe environment.  So they gathered in circles.“We did ask our teachers to spend some time if the students want to talk, listen to them. If they want to play, if they want to dance, if they want to express themselves and let off some steam, because this election has been such a stressful one, allow that to be,” she explained.Anderson said that they also used the election results as a teaching moment  to reinforce how the U.S. government works – that no one person runs it, but rather several branches.She added that the election has reinforced another lesson for teachers.“We’re preparing our next set of adults for the electoral process that they will go through and it’s so important that they be able to handle it responsibly when they become adults,” she said.center_img Courtesy Gina ApplegateMontessori teacher Gina Applegate received this note from a student troubled by the election. Here’s her response. Listenlast_img read more

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Texas Company Recalls Nearly 25 Tons Of Smoked Sausage Items

first_img Share tOrange.bizEddy Packing Co., a Texas company, has recalled nearly 25 tons (23 metric tons) of smoked sausage products due to possible plastic contamination.The U.S. Department of Agriculture released a statement Friday saying the recall involves products with packing dates of April 5 and April 6. The products were shipped to food service and retail locations in California, Georgia, Illinois, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas.The problem was discovered when Eddy Packing received complaints from a restaurant about white, hard plastic found in some sausage during slicing. No injuries or illnesses have been reported.The recalled products have “EST. 4800” inside the USDA mark. They should be discarded or returned.The recall includes Eddy Fully Cooked Premium Smoked Sausage, Dickey’s Barbeque Pit Original Smoked Fresh Polish Sausage Made With Pork and Beef, Lowe’s Original Recipe Naturally Hardwood Smoked Sausage Made With Pork and Beef, Eddy Smoked Sausage Made With Pork and Beef, Carl’s Pork and Beef Smoked Sausage, Eddy Southern Style Pork and Beef Smoked Sausage and Dickey Cheese/Jalapeno Pork and Beef Sausage Ring.Labels for FSIS Recall last_img read more

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How Democrats In Texas Are Trying To Win Over Fort Bend County

first_img Share Pu Ying Huang for The Texas TribuneCampaign volunteers work the phones at the Sri Preston Kulkarni campaign office in Sugar Land on May 8, 2018. Kulkarni faces Letitia Plummer in the Democratic runoff for U.S. Congressional District 22.At a glance, volunteers at Sri Kulkarni’s campaign headquarters are no different than those for congressional campaigns across the country — huddling over laptops, tapping voters’ numbers into their cell phones and concentrating on the call scripts in front of them.But when the person on the other end of the line picks up, some volunteers greet them not in English but in Vietnamese, Hindi, Urdu or Mandarin Chinese.For Kulkarni, a Democrat vying for a congressional seat in a Republican-leaning district, getting his message out to voters means not just knocking on doors and calling voters but also speaking the language they speak. “You need to reach out to those communities the way they are and the way they want to be reached,” Kulkarni said. “The blue wave is real. That force is coming from all of us.”Kulkarni and Letitia Plummer are vying in Tuesday’s Democratic runoff to take on U.S. Rep. Pete Olson, R-Sugar Land. Though President Donald Trump won the district by 8 percentage points in 2016, both Democrats see it as vulnerable, in part due to demographic changes — the same shifts that both candidates are using to their advantage. The district includes most of Fort Bend County, one of America’s most ethnically diverse counties: 20 percent of its residents are Asian, 20 percent are black, 24 percent are Hispanic and 34 percent are white. Clinton won the county decisively in 2016.In the March primaries, Kulkarni and Plummer came in first and second among five Democrats vying for the seat, drawing 32 and 24 percent of the vote respectively.Kulkarni, a former U.S. Foreign Service Officer, has focused his campaign on groups of voters that he thinks will help bring about a local “blue wave” in November — particularly Asian-Americans and Latinos, who have had low voter turnout in the past. When they’ve gone block walking in minority neighborhoods, Kulkarni and his team said they’ve noticed a sense of gratitude mixed with shock because campaigns have so rarely engaged those areas.“A lot of folks have told me that no one has knocked on their door before, no one has called them before,” Kulkarni said. “Some of them just grab me and pull me in like a life preserver because they’ve never had somebody come out that way.”Kulkarni’s campaign has translated his website into Spanish and Chinese, visited local temples and mosques and arranged appearances with Latino, Pakistani, Bangladeshi, Chinese and Indian media outlets, including Hindi/Urdu, Telugu and Malayali talk shows.One of the campaign’s youth volunteers, Nathan Troung, said many of the volunteers who are part of the Asian-American/Pacific Islander community recognize that their respective communities have low voter turnouts — and see the campaign as a way to help change that trend.“Just by the fact that Sri has been able to amass volunteers that engage in those communities in their own languages and their own cultural understandings, I think that does bring a lot to the table,” Truong said.Last week, nearly a mile away from Kulkarni’s campaign headquarters, Plummer was rallying a crowd of her own at a local restaurant. Similar to the the ethnic diversity of Kulkarni’s team, Plummer’s supporters reflected the diversity of the community she’s running to represent — African-Americans, Latinos and Asian-Americans.“I’m a fighter,” said Plummer, who’s been in the race since June.Plummer can also point to her own unique political experience — the longtime dentist has worked on political campaigns and lobbied the Texas Legislature regarding adoption and surrogacy rights. In 2016, she worked behind-the-scenes of Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign as a fundraiser and sat on the campaign’s small business task force. Though she said she’s campaigning solely in English, Plummer stressed that she’s also helping energize communities in the district who haven’t voted in the past — and credits her identity as an African-American woman of Indian and Arab descent. “The diversity of the district is definitely going to support a Democrat, for sure,” Plummer said. “People are excited about this race. For the first time in history, they have someone who speaks to them.” Olson’s campaign spokesperson, Chris Homan, told the Texas Tribune that Olson is taking the race seriously. “Pete celebrates the wonderful ethnic diversity of the district and is constantly working with people from all backgrounds to ensure he is effectively serving them in Congress,” Homan said. Since Trump became president last year, early murmurs of a potential “blue wave” election in 2018 have transformed into speculation of how big that wave will be.Democrats have focused much of their efforts this year on unseating three of the state’s Republicans: John Culberson of Houston, Will Hurd of Helotes and Pete Sessions of Dallas. Though all three Republicans were re-elected in 2016, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton beat Republican Donald Trump in all three districts that year. Collectively, the Democratic primaries in those districts drew nearly 20 candidates and millions of dollars in fundraising. Those three primary races are each now down to two candidates facing off in the May 22 runoffs.But Democrats are also still battling in several runoffs for congressional districts that Trump won, in hopes that a national mood favoring Democrats will be strong enough to sweep them into office as well.Jacey Jetton, chairman of the Fort Bend County Republican Party, said Olson’s district isn’t in danger of flipping because Republicans are campaigning aggressively enough to ensure that their supporters turn out in big numbers in November. With a focus on grassroots organizing, Jetton said the energy from red voters remains strong. “We are the most diverse county in the country and people move here from all over the country because of the county Republicans have built,” Jetton said. “Republicans are still showing up. We haven’t slowed down one bit.”Nathan Gonzalez, editor and publisher of the Washington, D.C.-based Inside Elections, said he’s skeptical when campaigns appear to be relying heavily on turning out non-voters, but doesn’t rule out the strategy’s potential effectiveness, particularly in a climate in which Trump’s presidency is prompting an increase in civic action.“I think the burden of proof is on Democrats to show that they can harness the energy from the protests and increasing fundraising and large number of candidates in races into votes,” Gonzalez said. last_img read more

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