NAD to close LPIA on Friday

first_img Related Items:#LyndenPindlingInternationalAirport, #magneticmedianews Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Bahamas, September 5, 2017 – Nassau – Airport operations in New Providence may cease by Friday but it is hard to give a definitive time explained Nassau Airport Development company officials today.    The NAD hurricane plan is activated as the facility also watches the motion of Hurricane Irma, this was revealed today in a meeting held by NAD with community stakeholders.This timeline is for the #LyndenPindlingInternationalAirport only, though as the country’s main gateway the cessation of operations means airports around the country will be impacted.    NAD said they expected the suspension of service to last only to Saturday evening if Irma continued on its current path at its current strength.#MagneticMediaNewslast_img read more

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FCC chairman addresses 5G safety concerns in letters to lawmakers

first_img Share your voice FCC 6 Mobile FCC Chairman Ajit Pai says lawmakers need not worry about 5G safety concerns.  / Getty Images FCC Chairman Ajit Pai is trying to quell fears among lawmakers that 5G radios are dangerous to health. On Thursday, the chairman sent a series of letters to lawmakers in response to inquiries about health concerns related to 5G that been sent to him in the past couple of months. In each of the letters he said that the FCC places a “high priority on the safety of wireless services and devices.” He said the agency’s guidelines for RF exposure are derived from guidance from the Environmental Protection Agency, as well as the industry group the IEEE and the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. “The FCC relies on the expertise of health and safety agencies and organizations with respect to appropriate levels of RF exposure,” he said. “These institutions have extensive experience and knowledge in RF-related issues and have spent a considerable amount of time evaluating published scientific studies that can inform appropriate exposure limits.”The response comes as concerns about the safety of 5G wireless technology has been increasing among lawmakers on Capitol Hill. Three Congressmen in the past two months have sent letters to the agency expressing their concerns about potential negative health effects due to exposure to radio frequencies used in delivering 5G wireless service. Representatives Andy Kim, a Democrat from New Jersey,  Thomas Suozzi, a Democrat from New York, and Peter Defazio, a Democrat from Oregon, say their constituents are worried that 5G radios, which are being deployed atop street lights every few blocks in many communities, may have negative effects that are still unknown. “Small cell towers are being installed in residential neighborhoods in close proximity to houses throughout my district,” said Rep. Suozzi in his letter. “I have heard instances of these antennae being installed on light poles directly outside the window of a young child’s bedroom. Rightly so, my constituents are worried that should this technology be proven hazardous in the future, the health of their families and value of their properties would be at serious risk.”5G, which refers to the fifth generation of cellular technology, is the next big thing in wireless technology and it’s been hailed as the foundation for other big trends like self-driving cars and streaming virtual reality.Unlike previous generations of wireless, 5G will require up to five times the amount of infrastructure as 3G or 4G deployments. The big promise of 5G — a massive leap in speed — requires the use of super high-frequency radio waves, called millimeter-wave spectrum, that are limited by range and obstructions like trees. The result is a network requiring radios on every city block, versus 4G gear that transmits signals over miles.What this means is that there could be nearly 800,000 of these so-called small cells deployed in the US between 2018 and 2026 to provide 5G, according to a study commissioned by the wireless industry trade group CTIA. In a separate report, CTIA estimates that roughly 323,000 cell sites were in service at the end of 2017.Rep. Kim said in his letter that the FCC noted that the agency has not updated its regulations regarding radiofrequency RF safety since 1996. He also pointed out that the current RF safety guidelines don’t account for the higher frequencies that 5G service uses or the fact that so many more radios are needed to achieve 5G service coverage. He asked the FCC to answer a series of questions about what research has been conducted as it relates to the safety of 5G.”Despite the close proximity to sensitive areas where these high-band cells will be installed, little research has been conducted to examine 5G safety,” he said. He added that the FCC has admitted that its guidelines need to be reassessed with respect to the use of newer wireless technologies. Rep. Defazio noted that the Government Accountability Office made a similar recommendation in 2012. “It is unacceptable that six years later the FCC still has not conducted a reassessment of its 1996 guidelines,” Defazio said in his letter.In his letters, Pai noted that the FCC has had an open proceeding to address updating its guidelines since 2013. And he assured the lawmakers the agency is working through the “voluminous” record to see if anything needs to be changed or updated. But he did not address specific concerns brought up in the letters. He also offered to bring congressional staff into the FCC’s testing facility in Columbia, Maryland so that they could “see and speak with our engineers and technicians as they operate the RF testing equipment.”Pai’s response is consistent with comments he made to the press in April. When asked about the issue during a press conference in April, Pai acknowledged that the nature of 5G “will be very different” than  4G, since it relies on small cells. But he said that the radios operate at much lower power than traditional cell sites. He added that “from that perspective, I am confident that in consultation with the FDA, which is the lead on this issue, that the technology will be safe.” Tags Commentslast_img read more

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Iran launches ballistic missile

first_imgIran has launched a ballistic missile with a range of 2,000 km. Reuters File PhotoIran has “successfully” launched a ballistic missile with a range of 2,000 km, a state-media report said on Saturday.State-run Press TV broadcast a footage released by the government of “the successful test-launch” of its new ballistic missile, Khorramshahr, a few hours after it was unveiled during a military parade here on Friday with president Hassan Rouhani and senior military officials in attendance, reports Xinhua news agency.The report said the missile was launched late Friday, without providing further details.The ballistic missile is capable of carrying multiple warheads, Brigadier General Amir Ali Hajizadeh, a senior commander of the Islamic Revolution Guards Corps (IRGC) Aerospace Division, told the media on Friday.”The missile has become smaller in size (compared to other Iranian ballistic missiles) and more tactical, and it will be operational in the near future,” Hajizadeh said without further elaboration.On Friday, the Iranian armed forces commemorated the 1980-1988 war with Iraq by holding a parade in which Iran’s most advanced military power and abilities are showcased.Iran also displayed other home-made advanced missiles, including ballistic missiles, which are reported to have ranges of 1,300 km to 2,000 km.last_img read more

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Hill Earns CoSIDA Hall of Fame Honor

first_imgBy Mark F. Gray, Special to the AFROEd Hill was an understated spokesman for Howard University. In 30 years as sports information director for the Bison athletic program, Hill was more than a disseminator of information about the games students played. He was a mentor, instructor, confidant and friend for scores of young men and women who have played pro sports and ascended to prominent roles in the sports media industry.His professional life was highlighted when the College Sports Information Directors Association (CoSIDA) inducted him into their hall of fame during the annual convention at Gaylord Resort at National Harbor.Former Howard University Sports Information Director Ed Hill (2nd from left) with members of the 2018 CoSIDA Hall of Fame class following induction ceremonies at the Gaylord Hotel in Oxon Hill, MD (photo by Mark Gray).“You couldn’t have written a better script,” Hill told the AFRO. “Hall of fame, Washington, D.C., all of my friends, family, and mentors here to share in this moment, it doesn’t get any better than this.”Hill, who retired at the end of the 2016-2017 athletic season, never wanted the spotlight. He mastered the art of putting the shine on the accomplishments of players and teams who made history. However, he did take one last victory lap through the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference where he was honored by the schools in the league. Hill was treated as royalty by his MEAC brethren in a manner befitting a retiring pro athlete.On every campus, when Howard visited for their annual basketball games, the already minted MEAC hall of famer was showered with gifts and platitudes during his own special night. Ultimately it was his peers in the conference who lobbied for Hill’s place in CoSIDA history. It was as important to them, as it was for Hill, to make sure when he was honored amongst the all-time greats in his profession.“I’m quite proud to have Ed Hill as a longtime colleague and friend,” said former South Carolina State SID Bill Hamilton. “We pushed hard and lobbied vigorously to make sure that he would be honored in his own backyard, so his family and friends could share in his moment with him.”During the ascension of Black College football into the mainstream of college sports during the late 1980s and early 1990s, Hill’s marketing acumen brought credibility to Howard’s program. His two best marketing campaigns were for Howard quarterbacks Jay “Sky” Walker and Ted “Sweet Flight” White. Both signal callers led the Bison to HBCU national championships and played in the NFL. Their visibility was increased by clever designs of media guide covers and the reliability of Hill to consistently provide quality information, making it easier to get coverage from conventional media.Hill’s career began as a sportswriter with the Winston Salem Chronicle which gave him a perspective on how to develop relationships with sports journalists. He was relentless in providing information and accommodating the press despite the lack of space in facilities that remain less than state of the art at Greene Stadium and in Burr Gymnasium. Despite Howard’s lack of resources Hill’s professional resilience continued.Beyond his acumen in media and public relations, Hill’s mentoring and guidance helped mold many of today’s most prominent sports journalists at major networks and media relations professionals from his cramped work office space inside Drew Hall. Today that mentoring carries on into the streets of D.C.“We’re facing a lot of problems and I’m hoping to coalesce with other people to make a difference,” said Hill.last_img read more

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